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L. P. Brockett, Women's work in the civil war: a record of heroism, patriotism and patience 25 1 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: June 3, 1862., [Electronic resource] 7 1 Browse Search
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irst to the hospital of the Third Corps, and labored there till that as well as the other field hospitals were broken up, when she devoted herself to the wounded in Camp Letterman. Here she was attacked with miasmatic fever, but struggled against it with all the energy of her nature, remaining for three weeks ill in her tent. She was at length carried home, but as soon as she was convalescent, went to Camp Parole at Annapolis, as agent of the Sanitary Commission, to fill the place of Miss Clara Davis, (now Mrs. Edward Abbott), who was prostrated by severe illness induced by her severe and continued labors. In December, 1863, she accepted the position of matron to her old hospital, (Third Division of the Third Corps), then located at Brandy Station, where she remained till General Grant's order issued on the 15th of April caused the removal of all civilians from the army. A month had not elapsed, before the terrible slaughter of the Wilderness and Spottsylvania, had made that p
ceeded to the high ground above the landing, and after being divided into battalions, each was conducted in turn to the Government store-house, under charge of Captain Davis, who furnished each man with a new suit of clothes recorded his name, regiment and company. They then passed out to another building near by, where warm wateed their letters and deposited them in a large mail bag which was furnished, and they were soon sent on their way to hundreds of anxious kindred an friends. Captain Davis very kindly invited me to accompany him to another building, to witness the administration of the food. Several cauldrons containing nice coffee, piles of newitiful expression, cried out, Oh, wait for me I I think I shall never forget his look of distress. When he reached the wagon he was too feeble to step in, but Captain Davis, and Rev. J. A. Whitaker, Sanitary Commission agent, assisted him till he was placed by the side of his companions, who were not in much better condition than
ceeded to the high ground above the landing, and after being divided into battalions, each was conducted in turn to the Government store-house, under charge of Captain Davis, who furnished each man with a new suit of clothes recorded his name, regiment and company. They then passed out to another building near by, where warm wateed their letters and deposited them in a large mail bag which was furnished, and they were soon sent on their way to hundreds of anxious kindred an friends. Captain Davis very kindly invited me to accompany him to another building, to witness the administration of the food. Several cauldrons containing nice coffee, piles of newitiful expression, cried out, Oh, wait for me I I think I shall never forget his look of distress. When he reached the wagon he was too feeble to step in, but Captain Davis, and Rev. J. A. Whitaker, Sanitary Commission agent, assisted him till he was placed by the side of his companions, who were not in much better condition than
Clara Davis. Miss Davis not a native of this country her services at the Broad and Cherry Street Hospital, Philadelphia one of the Hospital Transport cMiss Davis not a native of this country her services at the Broad and Cherry Street Hospital, Philadelphia one of the Hospital Transport corps the steamer John Brooks mile Creek Hospital Mrs. Husband's account of her at Frederick City, Harper's Ferry, and Antietam Agent of the Sanitary Commission at institution was never permitted to die out. It was not patriotism,--for Miss Davis was not a native of this country-but rather a profound sympathy with the causr. A more lovely Christian character, a more unselfishly devoted person, than Miss Davis, I have never known. Her happy manner of approaching the soldiers, especiallere must be wings hidden beneath her cloak. After leaving Fortress Monroe, Miss Davis returned to Philadelphia, and recruited her supplies for the use of the soldirations which were the peculiar feature of her usefulness. The interest of Miss Davis was not limited to soldiers in hospitals, any more than were her labors confi
serve the public peace within insurrectionary districts. He referred to the answer of the Mayor of New Orleans to Captain Farraguti, and of the Mayor of Norfolk to General Wool, and to various letters, showing a lack of Union feeling at the South, and treason swaggers everywhere, and their armies recruited by decrepit old men, unchristian ministers and malignant women. Treason should where it can no longer fight and loyalty implores where it ought to command. The bill was referred. Mr. Davis, (Union,) of Kentucky, referred to Gen. Hunter's proclamation, and to the sad policy of weakening Gen. Banks so as to leave him to be whipped by the rebels, and said he believed Secretary Staunton took charge of the armies. Mr. Wilson, (rep.,) of West., said the President was entirely responsible for these orders for the arrest of Gen. McDowell's progress towards Richmond, and for the withdrawal of troops General Banks. It was done by the President, and the approval of the Secretary
with its own hospital material, consisting of ambulance wagons, transportation wagons, and carts, tents, stretchers. bedding, bandages, lints, medicines, instruments — the whole to be under the immediate supervision of the Senior Surgeon of Brigade. III. Whenever, in the opinion of the medical Director, it is deemed necessary or desirable, the material of the several brigades composing a division will be coalesced, and will constitute, under the immediate charge of the Chief Surgeon of Davis on, a division infirmary. Upon such necessity ceasing, each brigade will reassemble at its own headquarters, as before, its respective ambulance equipments, which will be held in readiness to move with it, should the brigade receive marching orders. IV. A detail of men — the number to be determined by the commanding General--will be made from the line, whose duty it will be to remove the wounded from the field to the infirmaries. They will be armed only with revolvers, and will wear s
owels, seriously; R B Wood, thigh broken by ball. Company F.--Corpl Daniel Murphy, shoulder; Privates John Spruce, do; James Taylor, hand; George Madison, missing. Company G.--Wounded — Private H T Stratton, in thigh; Wm Harlow in thigh; H E Ponton, in hand; Wm B Graves, in hand; Wm L Jones, in face; R H Ponton, in hand; Wm P Spencer, in arm. Company H.--Killed--Private John Pendleton. Wounded — Private J A Barbour, in hand; R Christian, in both arms; badly; R W Cox, in foot; J W Davis, in shoulder, badly; J Y Jennings, in head, slight; J R Johnson, in leg, badly; Ed B McGinnis, in head, badly; Geo W Mays, Sr, in thigh, slight; James W Mays, arm broken; P P Stinnett, in arm, slight; R N Stinnett, mortally; Henry Ward, finger shot off; Corp'l E L Cox, in hip, arm, and thigh, badly. Company I.--Wounded — Capt D G Waller, mortally; Serg't Daniel Higginbotham, mortally; Private John T Evans, seriously; S B Logan; D T Dogan slightly; Benj Hartless, slightly; Jesse C Wright,<
ts, papets &c. G J Kelly, $10. Mrs. W H Simmes Halifax, $10. Misses E B and M C Sims, Halifax, 6 pairs socks and I comfort. Misses Mattie and Lou Holladay Louisa lint. P H Mayor 30 copies Dr. Moore's sermon. S A Society, Hanover, through Miss Chewning, 12 pairs socks, 1 comfort and blanket. A lady of Richmond, $10. Mrs Doel Foster, Halifax, lint. Mrs. R B Raine, Charlotte, 3 pairs socks. Mary Gill and others, proceeds of fair, $100. Mrs Clara Davis, $6. Mrs. Dill, $5. Some ladies of Nottoway, $10. Ladies of Cumberland, through M S Brown, 15 doz eggs, bread, dried fruit old linen, &c. Some ladies of Charlotte, through Mrs Wm. W. Read, 4 Lams jars butter, corned beef pars breed and biscuit, dried peaches, shirts, lint, rags, &c. McHart. Albemarle, $5. Ladies of Black Walnut; Halifax butter, bread and biscuit crackers and cakes, corned beef, &c. Ladies of Meadville through S Ayres 23 shirts, 1 comfort,