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The Daily Dispatch: October 26, 1861., [Electronic resource] 9 1 Browse Search
Lucius R. Paige, History of Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1630-1877, with a genealogical register 4 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 2 0 Browse Search
Wendell Phillips, Theodore C. Pease, Speeches, Lectures and Letters of Wendell Phillips: Volume 1 2 2 Browse Search
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of all military organizations in the State are required to report to Major-General Chamberlain......Jan. 12, 1880 Republicans organize a legislature......Jan. 12, 1880 Governor Garcelon's office being vacant after Jan. 7, President of the Senate Lamson asks if Major-General Chamberlain will recognize him as governor. Chamberlain refers the question to the Supreme Court......Jan. 12, 1880 Supreme Court recognizes the Republican legislature. The Fusionists become demoralized, and Daniel Davis assumes the office of governor......Jan. 16, 1880 Gen. Harris M. Plaisted, Greenback, elected governor......Sept. 13, 1880 Act passed making women eligible to the office of supervisor of schools and superintending school committees......1881 United States Senator James G. Blaine appointed Secretary of State......1881 Act passed restoring the death penalty for murder......1883 Vote on amending the constitution, forever prohibiting the sale of intoxicating liquors, 70,783 for
Wendell Phillips, Theodore C. Pease, Speeches, Lectures and Letters of Wendell Phillips: Volume 1, chapter 9 (search)
restrained, (that was the old Federalist; the man who never was inclined to trust the people too far; the man who was in favor of a strong government!)--he did not object to this provision ; all he asked was a two-thirds vote. Then comes Mr. Daniel Davis of Boston. You may not have known him, Gentlemen; but those of us who are older remember him as the Solicitor-General for the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. He says:-- If the resolutions were before the committee in a form which admi that the Legislature do not like him. Is not this unlimited power? The claim of Mr. Loring is, substantially, that you abuse your power, unless you charge, and prove, that he has offended against a statute in such case made and provided. Mr. Daniel Davis says: No reason need be given for the removal of a judge, but that the Legislature do not like him. That is his idea of the power of this Legislature. Then comes Mr. Henry H. Childs of Pittsfield. I do not know his history. He did not
m. Mehetabel, dau. of Jacob Watson, 21 June 1795, and had James, b. 19 Mar. 1797. Adino the f. d. 8 Jan. 1798; his w. Mehetabel m. Thomas Hastings 3 Oct. 1802, and d. 7 Jan. 1850. 29. Samuel, parentage not ascertained, m. Susanna Lane of Bedford, and had Samuel Emery, b. 1806, d. 21 July 1870; Susanna, b. 13 Oct. 1808, m. George W. Hubbard 4 Mar. 1827, d. 21 July 1852; Mary Adeline, b. 17 Feb. 1811, m. Gilbert Cutting 25 Nov. 1832; Isaac H., b. 23 Ap. 1813; Amittai, b. 3 Oct. 1815, m. Daniel Davis 1834; Sylvana, b. 3 Mar. 1818, m. Rufus Cox 2 Ap. 1846; James P., b.——, d. 12 Sept. 1874, a. 51; Abby, b.——; Andrew Jackson, b.——, res. here. Samuel the f. res. in Cambridgeport, and d. 19 Jan. 1857, a. 74; his w. Susanna d. 28 Ap. 1872, a. 86. Haugh, Atherton (otherwise written Hough and Hought), was one of the Assistants in 1635, and owned a house and farm embracing the whole of the upland in East Cambridge, and in 1642 he had added so much to his farm that it contained two hu
m. Mehetabel, dau. of Jacob Watson, 21 June 1795, and had James, b. 19 Mar. 1797. Adino the f. d. 8 Jan. 1798; his w. Mehetabel m. Thomas Hastings 3 Oct. 1802, and d. 7 Jan. 1850. 29. Samuel, parentage not ascertained, m. Susanna Lane of Bedford, and had Samuel Emery, b. 1806, d. 21 July 1870; Susanna, b. 13 Oct. 1808, m. George W. Hubbard 4 Mar. 1827, d. 21 July 1852; Mary Adeline, b. 17 Feb. 1811, m. Gilbert Cutting 25 Nov. 1832; Isaac H., b. 23 Ap. 1813; Amittai, b. 3 Oct. 1815, m. Daniel Davis 1834; Sylvana, b. 3 Mar. 1818, m. Rufus Cox 2 Ap. 1846; James P., b.——, d. 12 Sept. 1874, a. 51; Abby, b.——; Andrew Jackson, b.——, res. here. Samuel the f. res. in Cambridgeport, and d. 19 Jan. 1857, a. 74; his w. Susanna d. 28 Ap. 1872, a. 86. Haugh, Atherton (otherwise written Hough and Hought), was one of the Assistants in 1635, and owned a house and farm embracing the whole of the upland in East Cambridge, and in 1642 he had added so much to his farm that it contained two hu
The Daily Dispatch: October 26, 1861., [Electronic resource], By the Governor of Virginia.--a Proclamation. (search)
the thigh; Gerald Wilson, slightly. Frank Clark, ( nephew of Mr. Cooper,) mortally;--Short, slightly, John Devind, wounded in the head not mortally; North Saunders, in the leg, Capt. K. P. Hill of the Camden Rifles brother of Gen. D. H. Hill, of North Carolina and member of the Mississippi Secession Convention,) slightly in the arm; and Willis Haddox, slightly. The entire causalities upon our side may be considered definitely ascertained, since a dispatch was received yesterday by President Davis from Gen. Beauregard, based on a report from Gen. Evans, in which the Confederate loss is stated at 27 killed and 120 wounded. The Federal loss is set down by same high authority at 1,200 killed, wounded occurred. We have no doubt of the entire accuracy of this information. As we stated yesterday there is no truth in the rumor that Gen. Evans has fallen back from Leesburg, though it seems to be the general impression that the enemy crossed the river subsequent to the battle and again
Brigadier General appointed. We learn that Col. Richard Taylor, (son of the late President Taylor, and brother-in-law of President Davis,) has been appointed a Brigadier General of the Provisional Army, and has been tendered the appointment of Quartermaster General at Richmond. Col. Taylor is now at Manassas in command of a Louisiana regiment.
The Daily Dispatch: October 26, 1861., [Electronic resource], By the Governor of Virginia.--a Proclamation. (search)
ndred and fifty in number, had also formed themselves into a company of Home Guards. There is a citizen patrol corps composed of Northern men, commanded by Capt. Daniel Davis, a Connecticut Yankee, a low and vulgar fellow, despised by all the better portion of the community. Our informants state that they were compelled to lice to our Generals on the Potomac." Gen. Beauregard called my attention to it, and authorized me to deny unequivocally the assertion that "he had applied to President Davis for leave to advance on the enemy and that it had been refused." I have the means of knowing, and have good reason to believe that Gens. Johnston, Beauregard, the region bordering upon Albemarle Sound, and to check any rear movement of the enemy against Norfolk. It is therefore of great importance that the eyes of President Davis and Gov. Clark should be directed to that point. The intimations from the North are strong that the enemy will soon attempt to assail Roanoke Island with a s