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The Daily Dispatch: July 29, 1861., [Electronic resource] 13 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 30. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 12 0 Browse Search
Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A. 6 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 24. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 19. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 1 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 1 1 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: January 7, 1862., [Electronic resource] 1 1 Browse Search
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Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A., Chapter 1: the invasion of Virginia. (search)
miles distant. The cavalry, consisting of Colonel R. C. W. Radford's regiment of nine companies and several unattached companies, was employed mainly on scouting and picketing duty with Evans, Bonham, and Ewell, one company being on my right to watch the lower fords of the Occoquon, and the landings on the Potomac below the mouth of the Occoquon, where it was subsequently joined by another. It was my duty to watch the right of our line, and the two companies of cavalry on that flank, Eugene Davis' and W. W. Thornton's companies of Virginia cavalry, were placed under my command, and Captain John Scott was assigned to the immediate command of them. A few days after my arrival, under orders from General Beauregard, I made a reconnaissance to the village of Occoquon, near the mouth of the stream of that name, with the 24th Regiment, and examined the landings of the Potomac as far down as Freestone Point. Early in July General Beauregard summoned all his brigade commanders to a
Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A., Index. (search)
09 Dance, Captain, 241, 307, 308, 310, 311, 313, 314, 315 Daniel, General, 346 Daniel, Major J. W., 187, 310, 314, 349, 359, 473, 474, 479, 480 Danville, 104 D'Aquin, Captain, 176, 180 Darien, 260 Darkesville, 283, 413 Davis, Eugene, 4 Davis, General, 353 Davis, President, Jefferson, 27, 45, 56, 473 Death of Jackson, 235 Delaware, 45, 157 Dement, Captain, 97, 98, 108, 111, 176, 179 Deep Creek, 170, 201 Deep Run, 167, 168, 193, 194, 198, 199, 202, 205, 206Davis, General, 353 Davis, President, Jefferson, 27, 45, 56, 473 Death of Jackson, 235 Delaware, 45, 157 Dement, Captain, 97, 98, 108, 111, 176, 179 Deep Creek, 170, 201 Deep Run, 167, 168, 193, 194, 198, 199, 202, 205, 206, 209, 211, 221 Department of the Gulf, 418 Department of Northern Virginia, 51 Department of Southwestern Virginia and Eastern Tennessee, 461 Department of Susquehanna, 417, 418, 419 Department of Washington, 344, 417, 418, 419 Department of Western Virginia, 417, 418, 419 Dillstown, 255 Dix, General (U. S. A.), 51 Dogan House, 26 Doles, General, 267, 268, 346, 363 Douglas, Colonel, 108, 109, 112, 143 Downman's House, 223, 224, 227, 228, 231, 232 Drainesville, 52
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 19. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Nineteenth of January. (search)
ters; Pickett Camp, Dr. Eggleston; Lee Camp, Captain J. B. McKinney; Richmond, Hon. J. Taylor Ellyson; The Undying Fame of Lee was to have been responded to by Rev. Dr. M. D. Hoge, but he was unavoidably absent, consequently the speech was made in an excellent manner by Hon. F. R. Farrar. The Incomparable Infantry of the Army of Northern Virginia, Hon. J. M. Hudgins' of Caroline county; First Virginia Regiment, Colonel Henry C. Jones; songs by Captain Frank Cunningham; banjo and songs, Mr. Eugene Davis; First Regiment, Virginia Volunteers, Captain E. Leslie Spence; Cavalry of the A. N. V., Colonel G. Percy Hawes; Artillery of the A. N. V., Major H. C. Carter; Scouts of the Army, Captain John Cussons; Ladies of the South, Major J. H. H. Figgett, of Botetourt; Missouri (by a son of Missouri), Richard T. Flournoy. Speeches were made by Senator Parrish and Major McCann, and Lieutenant-Colonel Crump read an original poem on Lee and Pickett Camps. At a late hour the meeting adjourned.
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 24. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Company D, Clarke Cavalry. (search)
. Ashby, John H. Anderson, Milton B. Anderson, Jacqueline R. Ambler, Jonah Bell, James D. Bell, John W. Bell, William H. Brown, John S. Blackburn, Charles H. Brabham, John Barbee, Carter Berkeley, Thaddeus Baney, William Bonham, Isaac Bonham, M. R. P. Castleman, Robert H. Castleman, James R. Castleman, John T. Crowe, H. Clay Crowe, John Carper, Henry Catlett, F. H. Calmes, Marquise Calmes, Nathaniel B. Cooke, John Dearmont, Thomas Dearmont, Peter Dearmont, Thomas Dement, Horace P. Deahl, Eugene Davis, Albert S. Davis, Strother Davis, James B. Everhart, J. Newton Everhart, O. R. Funsten, Kinloch Fauntleroy, C. Powell Grady, Temple Grady, Edward K. Grady, William Gibson, James Lee Griggs, George Harris, John Harris, Charles W. Hardesty, William T. Hammond, Taliaferro Hunter, William H. H. Harley, Madison Hite, Irvine Hite, Fontaine Hite, Cornelius Hite, William Hite, Solomon Hibbs, A. J. Harford, Robert Jones, Walter Janney, John M. Johnson, James Kiger, J. M. Keller, Charles Kendall, J
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.42 (search)
ing his speech, and at its close he received quite an ovation. Captain Stratton moved that the thanks of the camp should be extended to the distinguished speaker for his eloquent and patriotic oration, and the motion was seconded, though before it could be put Captain Alex. Archer moved to amend it so as to include the thanks of the entire audience. The amendment was accepted, and the motion adopted by a rising vote. The Tony Miller Combination played several selections, and Mr. Eugene Davis, Sr., by special request, sang several dialect songs, which were liberally applauded. Judge Farrar speaks. Judge F. R. Farrar was called upon by Commander Peay, and responded very happily. He prefaced his remarks with a graceful compliment to Captain Parks, and said he had no desire to mar the perfect autonomy, as he wittily termed it, of the occasion, by any words of his. He was induced to proceed, however, and with his well-known versatility, he flitted from grave to joy, and tou
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 30. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Appendix. (search)
. First Commissary-Sergeant, C. H. Almond. First Quartermaster-Sergeant, F. Merriweather. Farrier, F. Williams. Chief Blacksmiths, W. B. Bowyer and B. Hughes. First Bugler, J. H. Kasey. Second Bugler, William Wilson. Chaplain, W. W. Berry. Adjutant's Clerk and Ordnance Officers, M. Guggenheimer and T. P. Tayloe. Regimental Band, George R. Lyman, Leader; Charles H. Rau, Thomas Walker, Frank Myering, A. R. Edwards, James M. Edwards, Hercy E. Carper, H. M. Harris, R. W. Thurman, Thomas Wilson. Company A, Captain William R. Terry, Bedford county. Company B, Captain John S. Langhorne, Lynchburg. Company C, Captain Andrew L. Pitzer, Botetourt county. Company D, G. W. B. Hale, Franklin county. Company E, Edgar Whitehead, Amherst county. Company F, James Wilson, Bedford county. Company G, R. C. W. Radford, Bedford county. Company H, Joel W. Flood, Appomattox county. Company I, J. D. Alexander, Campbell county. Company K, Eugene Davis, Albemarle county.
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 30. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.34 (search)
08.] To whom should the Southern people build monuments, to Lee or to Grant, to Lincoln or to Davis? Some years ago a clergyman of Washington, who had been a brave Confederate soldier, madecy in the world toward universal suffrage make it a reasonable hope? In building monuments to Davis and Lee, Jackson and Stuart we are declaring to the world and to future generations that the cau When the monument to Lee was unveiled in Richmond some years ago a picture in Judge represented Davis and Lincoln, Lincoln saying: If Davis was a patriot, what was I? This picture sets forth a greDavis was a patriot, what was I? This picture sets forth a great truth. One of two things is true; there is no middle ground. If Davis was a patriot, Lincoln was a tyrant. If Washington was a patriot, George III was a tyrant. Lincoln conquered the South andDavis was a patriot, Lincoln was a tyrant. If Washington was a patriot, George III was a tyrant. Lincoln conquered the South and built up a powerful nation, in which true lovers of liberty cannot rejoice, for it cost the lives of two noble republics, the old United States of America and the Confederate States of America. Berk
soil, or we are conquered. [Cheers.] I do not expect the latter to take place, Such men as we have can never be conquered, [cheers.] because they are fighting for that which is dearer than life itself — their rights [Cheers.] I have left behind me wife, children, home, everything that is dear to man. My men are in the same condition.--We would be worse than cowards if we gave up the contest with anything less than life. [Loud cheers.] In the great battle lately fought — the battle of Davis, Beauregard and Johnston — our men exhibited a foretaste of what Lincoln's menials may expect in every contest that is to follow. Any set of raw troops who can, with nothing but bowie knives, charge upon the bayonets of regulars, as our men did in the late battle, can never be whipped. There is no instance upon record where raw recruits were known to make such bold, daring, slashing charges right up to the mouths of cannon, manned by veterans, and take them, as did our men on that occasion<
From Gloucester Point. [Correspondence of the Richmond Dispatch.] Fort Brown, Gloucester Point, July 22 1861. To-day has been a day of rejoicing. Military enthusiasm is at its height. When the news of the victory of Davis, Beauregard and Johnston combined — the mighty trio of warriors-- reached us, there was cheering among us all; each congratulating the other upon the success of our Southern forces. Eleven guns were fired in honor of the victory, one for each of the States of our glorious Confederacy, the last of which was fled by the Colonel of this post, Chas. A. Crumpt. The largest battle ever fought on the American continent has been decided to the honor and glory of the brave sons of the South. But how else can it be when our soldiers are cheered on by the many blessings and favors of the fair sex of the Old Dominion. For when beauty declares her preference and asserts her away, men, too, must leap to her assistance and rescue and defend her cause. N
uit at Manassas. We are permitted to publish the following letter from a member of the Albemarle Light Horse, (Capt. Eugene Davis,) which was engaged in the battle at Manassas Plains: Manassas Junction, July 24. Amid your rejoicingshey had in custody. At this point, the Major remained until joined by Lieut. Geiger, with his platoon, and finally by Capt. Davis, (with the rest of the company,) who had also been subsequently sent in advance of Kershaw to reconnoitre, and had capy to anybody. I believe one of our horses did get a few buck-shot in the leg. During the absence of this party, Captain Davis began to discover the nature and value of the prize, and proceeded to disengage and send back the cannon. Seeing howing that we numbered not over fifty, and were far in advance of our own men, and a very short distance from the enemy, Capt. Davis sent Lieut. Randolph back for reinforcements, and he returned with a body of cavalry and some infantry, with whose ass
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