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The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), The Union men of Maryland. (search)
ll known that her people were much divided in sentiment. The late Henry Winter Davis always indignantly denied that a majority of the people of Maryland were ever, t unfortunate day. On the morning of the 20th, I was sent for by the Hon. Henry Winter Davis, and requested to accompany him to Washington. I understood that a e Relay, and taking the train there. When we reached the Annapolis Junction, Mr. Davis said, upon reflection, he thought I could do more good by returning to Annapotted that appearances gave room for doubt; and yet I firmly believe that Winter Davis was right in claiming for a majority of the Maryland people a fealty to the Uniul arguments, made through the press and directly to the people. The Hon. Henry Winter Davis, not a politic man like the Governor, and, therefore, distrusted by ith the Governor, and was regarded as a safe counselor. Both Judge Blair and Mr. Davis contended strongly that the people of Maryland were on the side of the Union,
Robert Stiles, Four years under Marse Robert, Index. (search)
eum, 357 Congressional Globe, 29 Conkling, Roscoe, 62 Connecticut Infantry; 27th Regiment, 174-75. Couch, Darius Nash, 165 Courts-martial, 351 Cowardice, 135, 274, 276-77. Crouch, Frederick William Nicholls, 49, 296 Crowninshield, Casper, 62 Culpeper Court House, Va., 73, 127, 192 Cumming, Alfred, 113 Currency, 63, 87-88. Custer, George Armstrong, 237 Dahlgren Raid, 236-37. Dame, William Meade, 240-44, 252- 53, 288-89. Daniel, John Warwick, 214 Davis, Henry Winter, 27 Davis, James Lucius, 82 Davis, Jefferson: and Lee, 17-18, 208, 312; mentioned, 26 Denman, Buck, 69-70, 130-31. Desertion, Confederate, 312-13, 323- 26, 349-51. Dixie, 202 Douglas, Stephen Arnold, 26 Drewry's Bluff, Va., 311, 322 Dunn House, Va., 310 Duty is the sublimest word ..., 361 Dwight, Theodore William, 33 Early, Jubal Anderson: description of and anecdotes concerning, 183-92, 204-206, 210; mentioned, 18, 50, 79, 92, 102, 105, 108, 125, 132, 15
as deplorable. Portions of the town had been stripped of every thing, and many of the inhabitants were actually suffering for the necessaries of life.--(Doc. 91.) An immense audience assembled at Baltimore, Md., to-night, to hear the Hon. Henry Winter Davis on the rebellion. L. W. Gosnell, Esq., a Breckinridge Democrat, presided. Mr. Davis was received with the most unbounded enthusiasm. He endorsed the war policy of the Government to the fullest extent.--See Supplement. Lord Lyon L. W. Gosnell, Esq., a Breckinridge Democrat, presided. Mr. Davis was received with the most unbounded enthusiasm. He endorsed the war policy of the Government to the fullest extent.--See Supplement. Lord Lyons issued a circular to all the British Consuls in Southern ports that they shall take for their guidance the law of blockade as announced by the State Department, which does not permit vessels to take in a cargo in blockaded ports after the announcement of the blockade.--(Doc. 92.)
Shaw marched his company upon the bridge with a view to carry the position, but lost one killed and six wounded. At this time, hearing nothing further of the firing at Romney, and concluding that Gen. Kelley had carried the place, and that the object desired had been accomplished, Col. Johns withdrew his force to Oldtown, Md., after a march of twenty-five miles.--(Doc. 107.) A large meeting was held at Elkton, Cecil County, Maryland, by the Union men. Speeches were made by Henry Winter Davis, Edwin H. Webster, Alexander Evans, S. S. Maditt, Esq., and others. There were several hundred ladies on the ground, and the display was grand.--N. Y. Tribune, October 30. Parson Brownlow has been forced to suspend the publication of his paper, the Knoxville (Tenn.) Whig. He gives his readers a farewell address, in which he says that he will neither give a bond to keep the peace, nor will he take an oath to support the Jeff. Davis Confederacy, and he informs the authorities that he is
o-Slavery strength concentrated, so far as possible, on Mr. Wm. N. H. Smith, American, of N. C. The next (fortieth) ballot gave Pennington 115; Smith 113; John G. Davis, anti-Lecompton Dem., of Ind., 2; and there were 4 scattering: necessary to a choice 118. Finally, on the forty-fourth ballot, February 1, 1860. Mr. Smith's name having been withdrawn, the vote was declared: for Pennington 117; John A. McClernand, Dem., 85; John A. Gilmer, Amer., 16; and there were 15 scattering. Mr. Henry Winter Davis, of Md., who had hitherto voted with the Americans, now cast his vote for Pennington, and elected him — he having the exact number necessary to a choice. John W. Forney, anti-Lecompton Dem., was soon after elected Clerk by a close vote. The majority in the Senate was not merely Democratic of tile Lecompton or extreme pro-Slavery caste; it was especially hostile to Senator Douglas, and determined to punish him for his powerful opposition to the Lecompton bill, by reading him out o
ecember 17th. a proposition which was substantially identical with Mr. Crittenden's, and which he presented as the ultimatum of the South. It was voted down some days afterward: Yeas 12; Nays 15: no Republican sustaining it. On the 18th, Mr. Henry Winter Davis, of Md., offered the following, which was adopted unanimously: Resolved, by the Senate and House of Representatives, That the several States be respectfully requested to cause their statutes to be revised, with a view to ascertain if urrender of fugitives from labor, are in derogation of the Constitution of the United States, inconsistent with the comity and good neighborhood which should prevail among the several States, and dangerous to the peace of the Union. 2. [Mr. H. Winter Davis's proposition, already given on page 386.] 3. Resolved, That we recognize Slavery as now existing in fifteen of the United States, by the usages or the laws of those States; and we recognize no authority, legally or otherwise, outside o
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Davis, Henry winter, 1817-1865 (search)
Davis, Henry winter, 1817-1865 Legislator; born in Annapolis, Md., Aug. 16, 1817; graduated at Kenyon College in 1837; elected to Congress as a Whig in 1854, and at the dissolution of that party joined the American or Know-nothing party, and was re-elected to Congress in 1858. At the outbreak of the Civil War he announced himself in favor of an unconditional Union while a candidate for re-election to Congress. He was overwhelmingly defeated, but in 1863 was reelected. Although representege in 1837; elected to Congress as a Whig in 1854, and at the dissolution of that party joined the American or Know-nothing party, and was re-elected to Congress in 1858. At the outbreak of the Civil War he announced himself in favor of an unconditional Union while a candidate for re-election to Congress. He was overwhelmingly defeated, but in 1863 was reelected. Although representing a slave State, Senator Davis was a strong antislavery advocate. He died in Baltimore, Md., Dec. 30, 1865.
pp, William, II, 465-467. Curtin, A. G., I, 138. Curtis, N. M., II, 347. Custer, George A., II, 475. Cutler, Lysander, I, 407, 415. Cuyler, John M., I, 181, 253. Dahlgren, John A., II, 85,91,92,96. Daily, Dennis, I, 497. Dallas, Battle of, I, 550-570. Dalton, Battle of, I, 499-512. Dana, N. J. T., I, 239, 292, 296, 297. Danby, Miss, II, 99. Daniels, Mary E., II, 556. Darling, John A., 11, 546. Davidson, J. W., I, 218. Davis, B. F., I, 277. Davis, Henry Winter, II, 321. Davis, James, II, 381. Davis, Jeff. C., I, 476, 497, 520, 28, 542, 557-560, 581, 584, 585; II, 29, 39, 43, 51, 52, 57, 146, 290, 345, 463. Davis, Jefferson, I, 99, 203, 488; II, 48, 93. Davis, Joseph R., I, 408, 415. Day, H. Howard, II, 327. Dayton, L. M., II, 62. Deady, M. P., II, 473. Dean, Stephen H., I, 23. DeGress, Francis, II, 13, 82, 90 119. Dehon, Arthur, I, 335. Delafield, Richard, I, 100. Delano, Columbus, II, 445, 466. Dennis
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 27. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Index. (search)
92. Craven, Commodore T. T., 223. Creigh, David, Murder of, 183. Custer, General George A., 255, 321, 329; his brutality, 372. Dana, C. A., 284. Davidson, Captain, Hunter, 221, 224. Davidson, Colonel R. M. H., Address of, 116. Davis, Henry Winter, 367 Davis, President, Effort to rescue, 132. Downing, H. H., Address of, 262. Drewry, A. S., 92. Du Bose, John W., 102, 293. Duncan. John N., 296. Dunn House, Quarters at the, 325. Early, General J. A., 52, 266; Campaigns oDavis, President, Effort to rescue, 132. Downing, H. H., Address of, 262. Drewry, A. S., 92. Du Bose, John W., 102, 293. Duncan. John N., 296. Dunn House, Quarters at the, 325. Early, General J. A., 52, 266; Campaigns of 1864, 1. Ebert, Valerius, 289. Edwards, Colonel O., 319. Ellerson's Mill, Battle of, 160. England, Captain A. V., killed, 50. Essex county, Va., worthies, 354, 355. F Company, 21st Virginia, 144; junior, 20. Fisher's Hill, Battle of, x. Fleming, Captain C. S., Sketch of, 192. Fleming, ex-Governor F. P., Address of, 113. Florida, The Confederate Dead of-Monument to at Jacksonville, 109; description of. 117; troops from, in the C. S. Army, 118; brigade at Gettysburg, 1
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 28. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.15 (search)
ded to a great extent upon the action of Virginia, which had not at the time of Mr. Wright's visit to Maryland separated from the Union. The most reasonable explanation of the termination of the negotiations was the secession of Virginia a few weeks after Mr. Wright's visit. With the loss of Virginia to the projected Confederacy the whole scheme evidently fell through. Marylands position. In the meantime, as is well known, the friends of the Union in Maryland had rallied. Hon. Henry Winter Davis' strong hand was exerted, and Governor Hicks was, almost by force, compelled to take sides with the North. His course resulted in the stay of proceedings by which the Southern sympathizers had expected to swing Maryland into the column of seceding States. These are, however, well known historical facts. The correspondence to which Governor Hicks makes reference would be interesting, if it could be found. The archives at Annapolis, Richmond, Trenton, Albany and Columbus should
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