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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 1 1 Browse Search
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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), International order of the King's daughters and Sons, (search)
national order of the King's daughters and Sons, A religious order consisting of small circles of men, women, and children. It is non-sectarian, and its members may be found in nearly all churches and in nearly every country. It was established in New York City in 1886 by a circle of ten women. Its aim is to help the needy and suffering, to consider the poor, and to engage in all good works. The members wear a small silver badge in the shape of a cross, bearing the letters I. H. N. on one side, and the date 1886 on the other. In 1900 it was estimated that the society numbered more than 500,000 members. It ranks among the strongest and most useful societies in the world. The headquarters are at 156 Fifth Avenue, New York. In 1900 the officers were: President, Mrs. F. Bottome; vicepresident, Miss Kate Bond; general secretary, Mrs. Mary L. Dickinson; treasurer, Mrs. J. C. Davis; recording secretary, Mrs. Robert Sturgis; and corresponding secretary, Mrs. Isabella Charles Davis.