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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Poetry and Incidents., Volume 7. (ed. Frank Moore) 18 0 Browse Search
Thomas C. DeLeon, Four years in Rebel capitals: an inside view of life in the southern confederacy, from birth to death. 14 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: August 3, 1863., [Electronic resource] 10 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: January 25, 1861., [Electronic resource] 7 3 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Poetry and Incidents., Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 3 1 Browse Search
Colonel Charles E. Hooker, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.2, Mississippi (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 1 1 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 11.1, Texas (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 1 1 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 1 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore) 1 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 1 1 Browse Search
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The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), The Baltimore riots. (search)
barricade. A car loaded with sand attempted to pass, but was seized by the rioters, who backed it up to the barricade, and emptied the sand on the pile of stones and anchors. A large number of negroes were working on the wharves at the time. These were ordered to quit work, which they did with alacrity, and were directed by the rioters to assist them on the barricade. They complied and, as Colonel J. Thomas Scharf, in his Chronicles of Baltimore relates, worked away with a will for Massa Jeff Davis and de Souf. At this stage of the proceedings Mayor Brown, who had hurried from Camden Station, arrived on the scene. What followed is best given in Mayor Brown's own words: On arriving at the head of Smith's wharf, he says in his official report, I found that anchors had been piled on the track to obstruct it, and Sergeant McComas and a few policemen, who were with him, were not allowed by the mob to remove the obstructions. I at once ordered the anchors to be removed, and m
, or the foibles, of his own, than did that of Innes Randolph, of Stuart's Engineer staff; later to win national fame by his Good old Rebel song. Squib, picture and poem filled Randolph's letters, as brilliant flashes did his conversation. On Mr. Davis proclaiming Thanksgiving Day, after the unfortunate Tennessee campaign, Randolph versified the proclamation, section by section, as sample: For Bragg did well. Ah! who could tell What merely human mind could augur, That they would run fromy superior, $3; limestone water, late importation, very fine, $3.75; spring water, Vicksburg bottled up, $4. Meals at few hours. Gentlemen to wait upon themselves. Any inattention in service should be promptly reported at the office. Jeff Davis & Co., Proprietors. Card: The proprietors of the justly-celebrated Hotel de Vicksburg, having enlarged and refitted the same, are now prepared to accommodate all who may favor them with a call. Parties arriving by the river, or by Grant
against itself; for the worse than weak Congress — which had formerly been as a nose of wax in Mr. Davis' fingers-had now turned dead against him. With the stolid obstinacy of stupidity it now refusehip of Mr. Foote--who wasted the precious time of Congress in windy personal diatribes against Mr. Davis and his pets --nothing was done to combine and strengthen the rapidly sundering elements of Cowithin itself; still Mr. Foote blew clouds of vituperative gas at President and Cabinet; still Mr. Davis retained, in council and field, the men he had chosen. And daily he grew more unpopular with . Strong and open expression was made of the popular wish for General Bragg's removal; but Mr. Davis refused — as ever — to hear the people's voice, in a matter of policy. He retained General Br enemy and our own errorsthere came general bad augury from the panic of Missionary Ridge Mr. Davis had visited Bragg's army, after the howl that went up on his failure to press Rosecrans. On h<
mond, Va., for the purpose of enrolling the names of such of the citizens as chose to form themselves into a Home Guard for the defence of the city.--Stringent orders in respect to communication with Norfolk, were published by General Wool.--The Seventy-first regiment, N. Y. S. M., left New York City for Washington.--The Legislature of Virginia appropriated the sum of two hundred thousand dollars to defray the expense of removing the women and children of Richmond to a place of safety. Mrs. Jeff Davis was sent under the care of ex-Senator Gwin to Raleigh, N. C. Governor Andrew, of Massachusetts, issued an order relieving the militia who rallied in obedience to the proclamation of Monday, and they returned to their homes, except such as volunteered for three years or the war. The men generally expected to serve three or six months, not knowing that an act of Congress required the service for an indefinite period.--At Newbern, N. C., the evening schools established by Dr. Vincent
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Poetry and Incidents., Volume 7. (ed. Frank Moore), The Propositions for an Armistice. (search)
Tuesday evening last, I said that propositions for an armistice or peace had been submitted to the President on the twelfth December last, which, had they been accepted, would have terminated this war by the first of April, upon a basis satisfactory to the people North and South. In referring to this statement, you ask: Who made these propositions for an armistice or peace, the adoption of which Mr. Wood pretends to believe would have settled the matter by All-Fools' day? Were they made by Davis and his fellow-rebels? If so, how does Mr. Wood know any thing about them? Has he been in secret correspondence with the enemy? Or were they made by some of the anti-war men here? If so, who authorized them? And what are the terms of the propositions from which Mr. Wood hopes so much? If they are honorable to the nation; if they are such as patriotic Americans ought to favor, why not make them public at once? To which I say in reply, that the statement referred to was made by me delib
ray. Jellies. Mule foot. Pastry. Pea-meal pudding, blackberry sauce. Cottonwood berry pies. China berry tart. Dessert. White oak acorns. Beech nuts. Blackberry leaf tea. Genuine confederate coffee. Liquors. Mississippi Water, vintage of 1492, superior, $3. Limestone Water, late importation, very fine, $2.75. Spring Water, Vicksburgh brand, $1.50. Meals at all hours. Gentlemen to wait upon themselves. Any inattention on the part of servants will be promptly reported at the office. Jeff Davis & Co., Proprietors. Card.--The proprietors of the justly celebrated Hotel de Vicksburgh, having enlarged and refitted the same, are now prepared to accommodate all who may favor them with a call. Parties arriving by the river or Grant's inland route, will find Grape, Canister & Co.'s carriages at the landing or any depot on the line of intrenchments. Buck, Ball & Co. take charge of all baggage. No effort will be spared to make the visit of all as interesting as possible
cheat “Fighting Joe,” And then to push on, without pausing to rest, To a junction with Bragg to recover the West, By these bold Carthaginians of Lee. Some think that abandoning Lee, The Cotton State Legions of Lee, Care little for Richmond — that Davis & Co. Have packed up their traps and are ready to go To some safer refuge down South--that, in fine, In Georgia they next will establish their shrine, And leave old Virginia to Lee. But it is our impression that Lee, And this wonderful army of Lesfortunes out West, As he thinks, by this triumph of Lee. But this Northern invasion of Lee, With the loss of this army of Lee, To Richmond so strongly invites us that way, That we are expecting the tidings some day That Dix has gone in, and that Davis has saddled His steed, and has over the river skedaddled To hunt up the army of Lee. And we think in these movements of Lee, With this hide and seek army of Lee, The occasion has come when his game may be foiled, And we hope that his schemes wil<
se Mexican mines, And then I may help you to cut up some shines.” “I wish you'd make haste,” says King Cotton, King Cotton, “I wish you'd make haste,” says King Cotton. King Cotton goes off with two fleas in his ear, He goes to those sons of----their mothers, The copperhead reptiles, who bother us here, Vallandigham, Wood, and the others; “Once more, my brave fellows, be true to your kind, And stay the war-storm that comes hot on! Bewilder our foe with your fire from behind, And go it for Davis and slavery blind! Come give us a lift,” says King Cotton, King Cotton, “Come give us a lift,” says King Cotton. The copperheads said: “To our kind we are true, We lie and we hiss as we used to, But the people have found they can do without you, And sad are the straits we're reduced to. Our necks feel already a kind of a twist, Our schemes tyrant Lincoln sits squat on; We try to dissuade those who want to enlist, But as to our fighting — we daren't resist.” “You cowardly
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Poetry and Incidents., Volume 7. (ed. Frank Moore), Proposition to hang the Dutch soldiers. (search)
sible interest in this revolution. . . . Why not hang every Dutchman captured? We will hereafter hang, or shoot, or imprison for life all white men taken in command of negroes, and enslave the negroes themselves. This is not too harsh. No human being will assert the contrary. Why, then, should we not hang a Dutchman, who deserves infinitely less of our sympathy than Sambo? The live masses of beer, krout, tobacco, and rotten cheese, which, on two legs and four, on foot and mounted, go prowling through the South, should be used to manure the sandy plains and barren hill-sides of Alabama, Tennessee, and Georgia. . . . Whenever a Dutch regiment adorns the limbs of a Southern forest, daring cavalry raids into the South shall cease. . . . President Davis need not be specially consulted, and if an accident of this sort should occur to a plundering band like that captured by Forrest, we are not inclined to believe that our President would be greatly disgruntled.--Knexville Register.
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Poetry and Incidents., Volume 7. (ed. Frank Moore), Speech of Gen. Pemberton at Brookhaven, Miss., June, 1863. (search)
Speech of Gen. Pemberton at Brookhaven, Miss., June, 1863. soldiers: In assuming the command of so brave and intelligent an army as that to which President Davis has assigned me, I desire at once to win your confidence by frankly declaring that I am a Northern man by birth; but I have married, raised children, and own negroes in the South, and as such shall never consent to see my daughters eating at the same table or intermarrying with the black race, as the Northern teachers of equality would have them. I take command of you as a soldier, who will not fear to lead where any brave man can follow — I am no street soavrnger--no General Lovell. (Cheers.) If any soldier in this command is aggrieved, or shall feel himself aggrieved by any act of his superior officer, he must have no hesitation in applying to me personally for redress. The doors of my headquarters shall never be closed against the poorest and humblest soldier in my command. Come to me, if you suffer wrong, as fear
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