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The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley) 337 23 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 4. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 160 6 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 157 5 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 149 5 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 144 2 Browse Search
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman . 109 21 Browse Search
Philip Henry Sheridan, Personal Memoirs of P. H. Sheridan, General, United States Army . 84 2 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 83 7 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 79 7 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 4. (ed. Frank Moore) 77 5 Browse Search
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city, and doing the numerous other things necessary to be done in a city under martial law. Captain Mitchell and Lieutenant Wilson are my assistants, and, in fact, do most of the work. The citizens say I am the youngest Governor they ever had. May, 17 Captain Mitchell and I were invited to a strawberry supper at Judge Lane's. Found General Mitchell and staff, Colonel Kennett, Lieutenant-Colonel Birdsall, and Captain Loomis, of the army, there. Mr. and Mrs. Judge Lane, Colonel and Major Davis, and a general, whose name I can not recall, were the only citizens present. General Mitchell monopolized the conversation. He was determined to make all understand that he was the greatest of living soldiers. Had his counsel prevailed, the Confederacy would have been knocked to pieces long ago. The evening was a very pleasant one. A few days ago we had John Morgan utterly annihilated; but he seems to have gathered up the dispersed atoms and rebuilt himself. In the destruction of
al thrust as best I can. Father Stanley is slow, destitute of either education or wit, and examines applicants like a demagogue fishes for votes. Brigadier-General Jeff. C. Davis and Colonel Hegg called to-day. Davis is, I think, not quite so tall as I am, but a shade heavier. Met Captain Gaunther. He has been relieved froDavis is, I think, not quite so tall as I am, but a shade heavier. Met Captain Gaunther. He has been relieved from duty here, and ordered to Washington. He is an excellent officer, and deserves a higher position than he holds at present. I thought, from the very affectionate manner with which he clung to my hand and squeezed it, that possibly, in taking leave of his friends, he had burdened himself with that oat which is said to be one too alcade moved on. We crossed the Tennessee on the bridge of boats, and rode a few miles into the country beyond. Not a gun was fired as the bridge was being laid. Davis' division is on the south side of the river. The Tennessee at this place is beautiful. The bridge looks like a ribbon stretched across it. The island below, t
hey would not so delight in kicking up such a hellebaloo. This afternoon I rode over to Chattanooga. Called at the quarters of my division commander, General Jeff. C. Davis, but found him absent; stopped at Department Headquarters and saw General Reynolds, chief of staff; caught sight of Generals Hooker, Howard, and Gordon GrSomebody-Wellington, I guess-said there was nothing worse than a great victory except a great defeat. Rode with Colonel Mitchell four miles up the river to General Davis' quarters; met there General Morgan, commanding First Brigade of our division; Colonel Dan McCook, commanding Third Brigade, and Mr. Dana, Assistant Secretaryd the wounding of the rebel general. My brigade behaved well, did most of the fighting, and, owing to the darkness, probably, sustained but little loss. When General Davis came up I asked permission to make a detour through the woods to the right, for the purpose of overtaking and cutting off the enemy's train; but he thought it
mply a letter of General Sherman: Headquarters Department of the Tennessee, Chattanooga, December 18, 1863. General Jeff. C. Davis, Chattanooga. Dear General-In our recent short but most useful campaign it was my good fortune to have attacheer seed any you uns before. Well, keep a sharp lookout and you'll see they all have horns on. One day, while I was at Davis' quarters, near Columbus, a preacher came in and said he wanted to sell all the property he could to the army and get gre, where his brother-in-law resided, and his Confederate notes would not be worth a dime there. How is that, Parson, said Davis, affecting to misunderstand him; not worth a damn there? No, sir, no, sir; not worth a dime, sir. You misunderstood me, sir. I said not worth a dime there. I beg your pardon, Parson, responded Davis; I thought you said not worth a damn there, and was surprised to hear you say so. While we were encamped on the banks of the Hiawasse, a Union man, near seventy year
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., From Moultrie to Sumter. (search)
rkmen of secession sympathies were sent aboard the schooners to be taken ashore. Lieutenant Jefferson C. Davis of my company had been left with a rearguard at Moultrie. These, with Captain Fosteven our own people were deceived by the celerity and secrecy of Major Anderson's movement. Lieutenant Davis and some other officers had a mess, which was in charge of the wife of one of the soldiers.ful transit to Fort Sumter, went back to Moultrie in small boats to procure additional supplies, Davis walked over to the mess. He was received very indignantly by the woman, for coming to supper whing could exceed her astonishment when she learned that the entire garrison was in Fort Sumter. Davis carried her and her pots and kettles back with him. The next morning Charleston was furious.n battles and skirmishes in many parts of the field of war. Anderson, Foster, Seymour, Crawford, Davis, and myself became major-generals of volunteers. Norman J. Hall, who rendered brilliant service
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., Inside Sumter: in 1861. (search)
emed to be much perplexity among our officers, and Major Anderson had a conference with some of them in a room used as a laundry which opened on the terre-plein of the sea-flank. The conference was an impromptu one, as Captain Doubleday and Lieutenant Davis were not of it. But Captain Foster was there, and by his actions demonstrated his disappointment at the result. He left the laundry, bounding up the two or three steps that led to the terre-plein, smashing his hat, and muttering something a of Sullivan's Island to command the left flank of Sumter. Captain Doubleday divided his men into three parties: the first, under his own immediate command, was marched to the casemate guns bearing on Morris Island; the second, under Lieutenant Jefferson C. Davis; manned the casemate guns bearing on the James Island batteries; and the third-without a commissioned officer until Dr. Crawford joined it — was marched by a sergeant The non-commissioned officers in Fort Sumter were Ordnance-Serg
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., chapter 8.25 (search)
he 30th of August, 1861, as the Irish Brigade (23d Illinois Volunteers) lay encamped just outside of Jefferson City, Mo., I received orders to report to General Jefferson C. Davis, commanding in the town. On doing so, I was informed by General Davis that the cavalry regiment of Colonel Thomas A. Marshall, which had left for the SGeneral Davis that the cavalry regiment of Colonel Thomas A. Marshall, which had left for the South-west some days before, had reached Tipton, where it was hemmed in by the enemy, and could neither advance nor return, and that he wished me to go to Tipton, join Colonel Marshall, take command of the combined forces, cut my way through the enemy, go to Lexington, and hold it at all hazards. The next morning the Irish Brigackoned as effectives by Colonel Mulligan.--editors. forty rounds of ammunition, and but few rations. We then dispatched a courier to Jefferson City to inform General Davis of our condition, and to pray for reinforcements or even rations, whereupon we would hold out to the last. At noon of the 11th we commenced throwing up intren
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., The Pea Ridge campaign. (search)
arrison of the place. On March 1st Colonel Jeff. C. Davis's division withdrew from Cross Hollowsd of Osterhaus. The speedy arrival of Colonel Jeff. C. Davis's division on the right of Osterhaus, oops in a furious attack against Osterhaus and Davis. Hebert and a number of his officers and men d the excellent manoeuvring of Osterhaus's and Davis's forces, as well as the coolness and bravery a and Arkansas infantry, while the brigades of Davis, by striking the left of McCulloch's advancinglock p. M. to reinforce Colonels Osterhaus and Davis with the remainder of the troops of the First uring the night of the 7th the division of Colonel Davis had been called in by General Curtis from of it held in reserve. Pattison's brigade, of Davis's division, formed on the right of the Telegrave opened the battle; it will be a hard fight; Davis is already there. Please bring your troops inrtis had directed the movements of the troops, Davis's division and a part of Carr's, assisted by H[2 more...]
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., The opposing forces at Pea Ridge, Ark. (search)
6; m, 4 = 10. Second Division, Brig.-Gen. Alexander Asboth (w). Staff loss: w, 1. First Brigade, Col. Frederick Schaefer: 2d Mo., Lieut.-Col. Bernard Laiboldt; 15th Mo., Col. Francis J. Joliat. Brigade loss: k, 8; w, 34; m, 22 = 64. Unattached: Fremont Hussars Mo. Cavalry, Major Emeric Meszaros; 5th Mo. Cavalry (Benton Hussars), Col. Joseph Nemett; 1st Mo. Horse Battery, Capt. G. M. Elbert; 2d Ohio Battery, Lieut. W. B. Chapman. Loss: k, 12; w, 29: m, 14 = 55. Third division, Col. Jefferson C. Davis. First Brigade, Col. Thomas Pattison: 8th Ind., Col. William P. Benton; 18th Ind., Lieut.-Col. Henry D. Washburn; 22d Ind., Lieut.-Col. John A. Hendricks (m w), Major David W. Daily, Jr.; 1st Ind. Battery, Capt. Martin Klauss. Brigade loss: k, 17; w, 88; in, 6 = 111. Second Brigade, Col. Julius White: 37th Ill., Lieut.-Col. M. S. Barnes; 59th Ill., Lieut.-Col. C. H. Frederick; Peoria Ill. Battery, Capt. P. Davidson. Brigade loss: k, 29; w, 195; in, 3 = 227. Cavalry: 1st Mo., Col.
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., Holding Kentucky for the Union. (search)
s source they were armed. In Louisville, on the initiative of J. M. Delph, the Union mayor, a brigade of Major-General William Nelson. From a photograph. On the morning of Sept. 29th, 1862, General Nelson had an altercation with General Jefferson C. Davis in the Gait House, Louisville. General Davis shot General Nelson, who died almost instantly.-editors. two full regiments and a battery were organized, which were destined to play a very useful part. When the Legislature of which heGeneral Davis shot General Nelson, who died almost instantly.-editors. two full regiments and a battery were organized, which were destined to play a very useful part. When the Legislature of which he was a member had finally adjourned, Lovell H. Rousseau went to Washington and obtained authority to recruit a brigade, and, in order to avoid possibly injurious effects on the approaching election, established his camp on the Indiana shore, opposite Louisville. Nelson, after making arrangements for the distribution of guns to the Union men of the State, was authorized by the President to do a similar service for the Union men of East Tennessee, and for an escort was empowered to recruit t
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