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The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley) 337 23 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 4. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 160 6 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 157 5 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 149 5 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 144 2 Browse Search
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman . 109 21 Browse Search
Philip Henry Sheridan, Personal Memoirs of P. H. Sheridan, General, United States Army . 84 2 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 83 7 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 79 7 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 4. (ed. Frank Moore) 77 5 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman .. You can also browse the collection for Jefferson C. Davis or search for Jefferson C. Davis in all documents.

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William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman ., volume 1, chapter 15 (search)
ivision of Thomas's army, commanded by General Jeff. C. Davis, that was already near that point. Al to General Thomas the divisions of Howard and Davis, which belonged to his army, and to conduct myhorses, artillery, and every thing. General Jeff. C. Davis's division was ready to take the bridg the enemy commingled. The reserve of General Jeff. C. Davis was ordered to march at once by the poaccomplished that day. The division of General Jeff. C. Davis was moved close up to Ringgold, to assward moved from Parker's Gap to Cleveland, General Davis by way of McDaniel's Gap, and General Blai Blair's) was over, and Generals Granger's and Davis's divisions were ready to pass; but the diagon pretty good ford for his horses and wagons at Davis's, seven miles below Morgantown, and had made nemy had retaken after our passage up. General Jeff. C. Davis moved to Columbus, on the Hiawassee, vggregate Loss    1,949 No report from General Davis's division, but loss is small. Among th[7 more...]<
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman ., volume 2, chapter 17 (search)
ng retreated in the night of May 15th, immediate pursuit was begun. A division of infantry (Jeff. C. Davis's) was at once dispatched down the valley toward Rome, to support Garrard's cavalry, and thee 23d. The Army of the Cumberland was ordered to march for Dallas, by Euharlee and Stilesboroa; Davis's division, then in Rome, by Van Wert; the Army of the Ohio to keep on the left of Thomas, by a give up Allatoona. On the 25th all the columns were moving steadily on Dallas — McPherson and Davis away off to the right, near Van Wert; Thomas on the main road in the centre, with Hooker's Twent morning, viz., the 26th, and deployed his troops to the southeast and east of the town, placing Davis's division of the Fourteenth Corps, which had joined him on the road from Rome, on his left; but this still left a gap of at least three miles between Davis and Hooker. Meantime, also, General Schofield was closing up on Thomas's left. Satisfied that Johnston in person was at New Hope with
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman ., volume 2, chapter 19 (search)
anticipation of this very event. While I was with General Jeff. C. Davis, a poor negro came out of the abatis, blanched witourteenth Corps (Palmer's). Palmer's right division (Jefferson C. Davis's) was strongly refused along Proctor's Creek. Thisrefused, and began to prepare the usual cover. As General Jeff. C. Davis's division was, as it were, left out of line, I orerals Logan and Howard that they must look out for General Jeff. C. Davis's division, which was coming up from the directionon. I regained my horse, and rode rapidly back to see that Davis's division had been dispatched as ordered. I found GeneralGeneral Davis in person, who was unwell, and had sent his division that morning early, under the command of his senior brigadier, Moon the 28th, but wanted to reap fuller results, hoping that Davis's division would come up at the instant of defeat, and catcrd to the left over the battle-field of the day before, and Davis's division still farther prolonged the line, which reached
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman ., volume 2, chapter 20 (search)
divisions of the Fourteenth Corps (Baird's and Jeff. C. Davis's) were detached to the right rear, and held inhe movement, and ordered two of Palmer's divisions — Davis's and Baird's — to follow en échelon in support of Shville as chief of cavalry, and that Brigadier-General Jefferson C. Davis, the next in order, should be promotght rear, closing up with the Fourteenth Corps (Jeff. C. Davis) near Utoy Creek; at the same time Garrard's cathe 1st day of September that the Four-teenth Corps (Davis) closed down on the north front of Jonesboroa, conneeral Stanley was moving, followed by Schofield. General Davis formed his divisions in line about 4 P. M., swepbatteries of ten guns. Being on the spot, I checked Davis's movement, and ordered General Howard to send the t wooded. General Stanley had come up on the left of Davis, and was deploying, though there could not have beenunded.Total. Fourth (Stanley)166416582 Fourteenth (Davis, Palmer)4441,8092,253 Twentieth (Williams, Slocum
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman ., volume 2, chapter 21 (search)
rtions, but it would be a magnificent stroke of policy if we could, without surrendering principle or a foot of ground, arouse the latent enmity of Georgia against Davis. The people do not hesitate to say that Mr. Stephens was and is a Union man at heart; and they say that Davis will not trust him or let him have a share in his Davis will not trust him or let him have a share in his Government. W. T. Sherman, Major-General. I have not the least doubt that Governor Brown, at that time, seriously entertained the proposition; but he hardly felt ready to act, and simply gave a furlough to the militia, and called a special session of the Legislature, to meet at Milledgeville, to take into consideration the crial of the two corps of his Army of the Cumberland, remaining and available for this movement, viz., the Fourth and Fourteenth, commanded by himself and Major-General Jeff. C. Davis; and after General Dodge was wounded, his corps (the Sixteenth) had been broken up, and its two divisions were added to the Fifteenth and Seventeenth C
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman ., volume 2, chapter 22 (search)
ft wing was composed of the Fourteenth Corps, Major-General Jefferson C. Davis commanding, and the Twentieth Corps, Brigadieo kept their ranks. From Covington the Fourteenth Corps (Davis's), with which I was traveling, turned to the right for Milhouse of a man named Vann; the next day, about 4 P. M., General Davis had halted his head of column on a wooded ridge, overlove fields were all round the house; I sent word back to General Davis to explain whose plantation it was, and instructed him e of Georgia: We have had a special conference with President Davis and the Secretary of War, and are able to assure you t of Millen, with the Twentieth Corps. The Fourteenth (General Davis) was at Lumpkin's Station, on the Augusta road, about te a successful assault at one or two points in front of General Davis's (Fourteenth) corps. All of General Howard's troops (of little value to us, but so important to the enemy that Mr. Davis, the head of the rebellious faction in the South, visited
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman ., volume 2, chapter 23 (search)
in our arms and progress. Hie inquired particularly about General Jeff. C. Davis, who, he said, was a Democrat, and hostile to the negro. I assured him that General Davis was an excellent soldier, and I did not believe he had any hostility to the negro; that in our army we had noed admirable service. He then showed me a newspaper account of General Davis taking up his pontoon-bridge across Ebenezer Creek, leaving sler. Stanton, before becoming prejudiced, to allow me to send for General Davis, which he did, and General Davis explained the matter to his enGeneral Davis explained the matter to his entire satisfaction. The truth was, that, as we approached the seaboard, the freedmen in droves, old and young, followed the several columns to reach a place of safety. It so happened that General Davis's route into Savannah followed what was known as the River-road, and he had to er of the many most humane commanders who filled the army. General Jeff. C. Davis was strictly a soldier, and doubtless hated to have his wag
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman ., volume 2, Chapter 22: campaign of the Carolinas. February and March, 1866. (search)
swollen. It was composed as follows: Fourteenth Corps, Major-General Jeff. C. Davis. First Division, Brigadier-General W. P. Carlin; Second Division, Brigadiey's division of the Twentieth Corps, and reported the Fourteenth Corps (General Jeff. C. Davis's) to be following by way of Barnwell. On the 10th I rode up to Blackv had crossed the pontoon-bridge at Rocky Mount it was carried away, leaving General Davis, with the Fourteenth Corps, on the west bank. The roads were infamous, so anging Rock for some days, to allow time for the Fourteenth to get over. General Davis had infinite difficulty in reconstructing his bridge, and was compelled to nly knew by the vague rumors which reached us through rebel sources. General Jeff. C. Davis got across the Catawba during the 27th, and the general march was resumen he formed a line of the two leading divisions (Morgan's and Carlin's) of Jeff. C. Davis's corps. The enemy attacked these with violence, but was repulsed. This w
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman ., volume 2, chapter 25 (search)
ores we needed, prior to the renewal of our march northward. These changes amounted to constituting the left wing a distinct army, under the title of the Army of Georgia, under command of General Slocum, with his two corps commanded by General Jeff. C. Davis and General Joseph A. Mower; the Tenth and Twenty-third Corps already constituted another army, of the Ohio, under the command of Major-General Schofield, and his two corps were commanded by Generals J. D. Cox and A. H. Terry. These chan 1st Minnesota Battery. 15th Ohio Battery. 9th Illinois Mounted Infantry. G Company, 11th Illinois Cavalry. Signal Detachment. Army of Georgia. Major-General H. W. Slocum commanding. Fourteenth Army Corps--Brevet Major-General J. C. Davis commanding first division. Brigadier-General C. C. Walcott. First Brigade. Brevet Brig.-General Hobart. 21st Wisconsin Volunteers. 33d Ohio Volunteers. 94th Ohio Volunteers. 42d Indiana Volunteers. 88th Indiana Volunteers. 104th