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Ran away--$5 reward. --From my house, on Wednesday, 29th ult., Jim Davis, a black boy, 23 years of age. He has been in my employ as a dray driver. The above reward will be paid when delivered to C. A. Schwagerle, at Poorhouse Hill, Richmond, Va. au 2--1t*
The Daily Dispatch: August 4, 1862., [Electronic resource], The cavalry Exploit in Nicholas county. (search)
Ranaway--$5 reward --From my house, on Wednesday, 29th July, Jim Davis, a black boy, 23 years of age. He has been in my employ as a dray driver. The above reward will be paid when delivered to C. A. Schwagerle, au 4--2t* At Poor-House Hill, Richmond, Va.
Combined attack on the Arkansas — from Pope's army-- progress of robbery and out- rage by his troops — from McClellan's army, &c We have received Northern papers to the 31st.--An attack was made on the ram Arkansas, on the 22d ult., by Commodores Davis and Farragut. A dispatch, dated the 23d, says: The fleet from below was to engage the lower batteries, and the fleet from above to engage the upper ones, the gunboat Essex and the ram Queen of the West in the meantime to attack the Areveral shots, and had one man killed and two wounded. The Queen was also shot through several times. A dispatch from Memphis, July 28th, says: The Grenada Appsal, of the 24th, has a special dispatch of the same date, stating that Commander Davis and the gunboats had attacked the batteries and the ram Arkansas, and had been repulsed, with the loss of five boats sunk or disabled. The dispatch is replete with the usual rebel bombast. The Appeal, of the 25th, has a dispatch announ
Ranaway--85 reward --From my house, on Wednesday, 29th July Jim Davis, a black boy, 23 years of age. He has been in my employ as a dray driver. The above reward will be paid when delivered to. C. A. Schwagerle, au 4--2t* At Poor House Hill, Richmond, Va.
consideration of his not obtaining anything in his attempt to rob, and the statement made relative to his character, the Recorder dealt leniently in the matter, and turned him over to the provost-marshal, to be sent to his command. A charge of swindling was preferred against Frederick Gerrard, a free negro. Susan, slave of William H. Fry, had apprised the prisoner of the fact that she had in her possession one hundred and fifty dollars in gold and silver belonging to a free boy named Jim Davis. This money Gerrard determined to have, and he accordingly went to Susan and represented that Jim had been arrested on a serious charge, and had solicited him to call on her for the money he had left in her hands, to be used for the purpose of helping him out of the scrape. --Susan refused to give up the money unless he would bring some white person to corroborate his statement. The prisoner went off, but returned in a short while after with a white man as witness; whereupon the money wa