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allying under the old flag to fight for the Union, and, as they said, Redeem old Tennessee! John Davis the heroic sailor. When the record of the war comes to be written, not the least interestinhe most conspicuous of these in any chronicle of the war, must be the case of the gallant tar, John Davis, who:e courage in the attack on Elizabeth City, N. C., was made the subject of special mentionoff Roanoke Island, writing to Commodore Goldsborough, noticed a magnanimous act of bravery by John Davis, gunner's mate on board his vessel, at the taking of Elizabeth City. He says John Davis was aJohn Davis was at his station during the action, in the magazine, issuing powder, when a shell from the enemy's battery penetrated into the magazine, and exploded outside of it. He threw himself over a barrel of powdI beg leave to recommend the gallant and noble sailor alluded to; and he adds, in a postscript, Davis actually seated himself on the barrel, the top being out, and in this position he remained unti
ow. Henry Brailey. Charles Brown. Henry Bartlett. Thomas Dawson. Co. B.Charles Abraham. Frank Bartley. Henry Connor. Charles Cook. James Cooper. David G. Copp. Philip Carey. Duncan Crawford. Andrew Cronan. Francis W. Devine. William Dow. Stephen Doer. Edward Dillon. John F. Jordan. Co. C.Edward C. Doherty. Thomas A. Dow. Reuben B. Dow. James Eckelman. James Eldridge. John Fisher. John Farren. Winslow P. Eayers. Robert H. Eastman. Joseph Frey. George Riese. John Davis. William Barnes. Co. D.James Dunn. John W. Gallagher. Henry G. Fuller. Michael Hogan. Philip Hunt. William Hamilton. Charles Harris. Fred W. Hubner. Andrew P. Green. Michael Gahagin. Co. D.Frank Heill. Charles Ferguson. William Smith. Co. E.William Johnson, Corporal. Julius Rieser. James M. Harrison. Henry Hagedon. Michael Holligan. Alfred Horstman. Peter Kennedy. William B. Kelley. Rodney King. Michael Kenney. George Jones. Robert Slocum. Henry Urban. Co. F
........................ 241 Dana, N. J.T., Brig. Gen.,.................51, 55, 57, 58, 86, 110, 117, 134, 142 Danforth, George,...................................................... 187 Danforth, Jeremiah,................................................ 144 Danville, N. C.,..................................................... 337 Darnestown, ....................................................... 15, 46 Davis, Edward K., ..................................................... 51 Davis, John, .......................................... ............. 291 Dawson, Jackson, .................................................... 208 Dawson, Thomas, .................................................... 290 Dawes, Redford,................................ ............... 321 Day, Samuel W.,.................................................... 188 Dean, Charles,................................................ 330, 348 Deansfield, John, ...............................................
. Kingsley, Warren Sanger, Daniel W. Shaw, Person Davis, John J. Henderson, Daniel Fobes, Henry C. Rand, Horatio Locke, John Davis, David Ellis, Levi L. Cushing, and James H. Collins. At the meeting of the trustees held July 8, 1872, Milton L. Walto Machinery and boiler manufacture. Edward Kendall & Sons. Edward Kendall, the senior member of this firm, with John Davis, of Cambridge, originated the business in 1860, under the firm name of Kendall & Davis. This partnership continued forDavis. This partnership continued for several years, when Mr. Davis withdrew, and soon after George B. Roberts, of Cambridge, became associated with Mr. Kendall, forming a partnership known as Kendall & Roberts, which continued for more than twenty years. The recognized superior qualitMr. Davis withdrew, and soon after George B. Roberts, of Cambridge, became associated with Mr. Kendall, forming a partnership known as Kendall & Roberts, which continued for more than twenty years. The recognized superior quality of their work secured for the firm a prominent position among the leading concerns in their line in this country. This fact, together with the rapid development of manufacturing in New England after the war, caused their business to increase rapi
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2, Chapter 4: Pennsylvania Hall.—the non-resistance society.—1838. (search)
Senator Preston, the colleague of Calhoun, was winning the applause of his section by declaring in his seat, that if an abolitionist come within the borders of South Lib. 8.11. Carolina, and we can catch him, we will try him, and, notwithstanding all the interference of all the governments of the earth, including this Federal Government, we will hang him. This lawless and savage threat was heard without remonstrance by the senators from Lib. 8.159, 161. Massachusetts—Daniel Webster and John Davis. It remained for a Northern doughface, Charles G. Atherton, of New Hampshire, to offer the fourth gag-rule, Lib. 8.202. devised by a pro-slavery caucus at the beginning of the next session, and adopted under the previous question on December 11 and 12, 1838. Atherton's venerable grandfather, in the [New Hampshire] Convention which adopted the U. S. Constitution, in a speech of great length, pathos, and eloquence, opposed that instrument on the ground of its recognition of slavery (P
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2, Chapter 5: shall the Liberator lead—1839. (search)
to Ohio. The measure was as extraordinary as would have been a dissolution of the Society, and therefore our auxiliary societies would have been aggrieved by it, greatly. A nomination made before we see whether the parties will put up anybody for whom we can go, would, by the mass of our friends, have been deemed premature—and had we made a nomination, and the Whigs had put up Scott General Winfield Scott, just then prominent in connection with the troubles on the Canadian border. and John Davis, and we had called a Convention in New York State to nominate an A. S. electoral ticket, that Conven- tion would have declared it inexpedient to do so, and thus nullified the whole thing. It would have been thought a trick, getting away out here and doing what we knew we could not do at the centre. No; so extraordinary a move as the nomination of national candidates, in my opinion, should not be made by the Am. Society without due notice to that effect. Give due notice, and then all ar
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 1: travellers and observers, 1763-1846 (search)
The influence of the Notes, of their author, and of Jeffersonian ideals, is constantly met in other works of description. The allusions to Washington himself are scarcely more frequent. In 1794 Henry Wansey, an English manufacturer, breakfasted with Washington, and was struck with awe and admiration ; but about the same time, Thomas Cooper, who, in a flying visit, found land cheap and labour dear, remarks that the government is the government of the people and for the people. And when John Davis, the pedestrian, had from 1798 to 1802 entered, with equal interest, the mud-hut of the negro and the log-house of the planter, he dedicated his book to Jefferson. Isaac Weld the Irishman, author of a widely read book on the United States and Canada, wrote one of his thirty-eight letters from Jefferson's then unfinished establishment at Monticello. He made mediocre pencil sketches of Niagara Falls, and the Rock Bridge of Virginia, but secured a picture of Mount Vernon from a friend. He
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 3: early essayists (search)
ful weekly paper devoted to belles lettres, failed to set Boston ablaze. Yankee readers objected to his exercises in the manner of Goldsmith and Addison as sprightly rather than moral. While a law-student, Dennie had supplemented his income by reading sermons in unsupplied churches, and now to gain a hearing he fitted each of his lucubrations with a text and tempered his sentiments ostensibly for the pulpit. The lay Preacher, commenced in 1795, won immediate applause. Seven years later John Davis, the traveller, declared it the most widely read work in America, and its popularity contributed largely to the author's success as editor, first of The Farmer's weekly Museum at Walpole, New Hampshire, and finally of that notable literary gazette, the Philadelphia Port Folio. Though Dennie collaborated with his friend Royall Tyler in a melange of light prose and verse From the shop of Messrs. Colon & Spondee, which later developed into a series of Author's Evenings reminiscent of men
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 6: fiction I — Brown, Cooper. (search)
life which was to bulk so large in American fiction for half a century. His preface repeats his earlier plea, as Speratus, for native matter in native fiction. From that ideal he never swerved. The plague, Wieland's frenzy, Queen Mab in Edgar Huntly,these he had studied from the facts as he knew them. That his books are not more realistic proves merely that he was a romancer interested primarily in ideas and abstruse mental states which he saw with his eyes closed. Sir, he told prying John Davis, good pens, thick paper, and ink well diluted, would facilitate my composition more than the prospect of the broadest expanse of clouds, water, or mountains rising above the clouds. But when Brown opened his eyes he always saw Pennsylvania. His strangest supernaturalisms, too, turn out in the end to have rested on acts of nature which science can explain. It was his characters he romanticized. He saw in man a dignity which only the days of hopeful revolution can bestow, and he was thus
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Index. (search)
David, 319 Cromwell,--4, 5, 41 Cruse, Peter Hoffman, 311 Culprit Fay, 281 Curiosa Americana, 55 Curtis, G. W., 345 Curwen, Alice, 8 Cushman, Charlotte, 225 Custis, George Washington, 221, 225 D D'Alembert, 91 Daly, Augustin, 229 Daly, Charles P., 216 n. Damsel of Darien, 317 Dana, Richard Henry, 240, 262, 269, 269 n., 276, 278, 321, 345 Danse Canadienne, 188 Dante, 174, 264 Darby, William, 189 Davenant, 157 Davenport, E. L., 223, 224 Davis, John, 202, 234, 291 Day of doom, the, 156, 157 Days (Emerson), 359 Deane, Charles, 20 Death (Porteus), 263, 263 n. Death of Schiller, the, 270 n. Death of slavery, the, 270 Decatur, Captain, 226 Debates (Elliott), 147 n. Declaration of the causes and necessity of taking up arms, 141, 142 Declaration of Independence, 142-143 Declarations and resolves (I 774), 134 Deerslayer, the, 209, 303-304 Defence of the Constitution of government of the United States of Amer
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