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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 36. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.7 (search)
tay and aid to his father and, after his death, became its head and parent, rather than guardian, of the younger children. Little Jeff was devoted to him, and the later statesman never forgot to express his love and admiration of his elder. Joseph Davis rose to great influence and regard in his State and section; and acquired wealth. The next brother was a doctor and planter: Dr. Benjamin Davis, of St. Francisville, La. He married Miss Aurelia Smith, of that parish, and died at an advancedyears old, was sent to Transylvania College, Lexington, Ky. He was an earnest and intelligent pupil, but gave little promise of the brilliance, acumen and erudition that illustrated his later career. After their father's death, his brother, Joseph Davis, became the real head of the family, and it was he who gave special attention to the rearing of the youngest boy, and who directed his education. And by that time, Joseph Emory Davis had become a power in the law and politics of his section.
Ranaway --From the subscriber, on Monday, the 5th inst., a Negro Woman, named Betty. Said woman is about 5 feet 3 inches high, dark complected, with a lighter shade on both checks. I believe she is now somewhere in the town of Sidney, as she was last heard of in the neighborhood of Mr. Pacer. A reward of five Dollars will be paid for her delivery to me, or if placed in any jail, so that I can get her again. Joseph Davis, 214 Broad street. au 8--ts
nnot be made for a distribution of the prisoners now in Richmond through the Southern States? The States having penitentiaries might take some and have them put to work; and others could be distributed in small groups to avoid trouble in guarding and to remove from some citizens of Virginia the opportunity of making themselves conspicuous for ostentatious benevolence exclusively directed towards our enemies. Says the New York World: "Although the Rhode Island battery is reported safe, the fficers have failed to find it, though searching all the afternoon." Hon William H. Stiles, who recently came to Virginia as a private in the ranks of the Etowah Guards, has been empowered by President Davis to raise, a regiment in Georgia, for immediate service. The Fredericksburg News learns by "private express that our forces won another glorious victory above the Chain Bridge, six miles from Georgetown, on Thursday, last week. Why did not the private express bring the details?"
Privateersmen and prisoners of war. --The New York Times comments as follows upon the letter from President Davis to Abraham Lincoln, relative to the fate of our privateersmen now in the hands of the enemy: Davis, unfortunately, has it in his power to make this threat effective. He has in his hands a very large number of our prisoners, and will unquestionably retaliate upon them whatever treatment we may extend to these privateers. President Lincoln, in his proclamation, has announDavis, unfortunately, has it in his power to make this threat effective. He has in his hands a very large number of our prisoners, and will unquestionably retaliate upon them whatever treatment we may extend to these privateers. President Lincoln, in his proclamation, has announced his purpose to treat all who may accept letters of marque and reprisal from the Confederate Government as pirates, and the general sentiment of the public would unquestionably sustain him in so doing. It cannot be concealed, however, that the current of events may render it necessary to act with caution in this matter, and not take a position which may augment greatly the horrors — great enough at best — of this civil war. By taking and holding prisoners at all, it would seem to be re
Ranaway. --From the subscriber, on Monday, the 5th inst, a Negro Woman, named Reity. Said woman is about 5 feet 3 inches high, dark complected. with a lighter shade on both checks. I believe she is now some where in the town of Sidney as she was last heard of in the neighborhood of Mr Paces A reward of five Dollars will be paid for her delivery to me, or if placed in any jail, so that I can get her again Joseph Davis. au 8--ts 214 Broad street
ngton, which office he filled with ability and distinction till the commencement of the present war, when he accepted the post of Colonel, conferred upon him by Governor Letcher, unanimously recommended by the Council, and unanimously confirmed by the Convention. He was assigned to the command of our forces at Harper's Ferry, and continued in it till he was superseded by General Johnston. He then took command of a brigade, and was subsequently appointed Brigadier General by President Davis, During the manŒvures of the army in the Valley of Virginia, Gen. Jackson held a conspicuous position, and in the great battle of Manassas he carped an on viable and never-dying distinction. His command acted a part in that memorable engagement which will not be forgotten while deeds of valor and self-sacrifice are remembered by the people of Virginia and of the Confederate States. In person, General Johnson is nearly six feet high, with an erect, muscular, well knit frame. He has a f
garland. Well may we exclaim with the poet: "Immortal heir of universal praise, Nations unborn your mighty name shall sound. And worlds applaud that most not yet be found." poet We have much reason to thank Divine Providence that President Davis, both an able statesman and a valiant warrior, governs the helm of State in this most critical conjuncture, great in the war and great in arts of sway. Our armies are tied on by a galaxy of excellent commanders — McCulloch, Mcgruder, Johnstt, when ages pass away, Good men shall ban the fiendish can, invading as to-day." At the conclusion of the address, three cheers were given for Father McMahon, that would have fitted the air had they been raised outside beneath the azure vault of Heaved; three for President Davis, three for the Captain and three for the ladies of Pattersonville The St. Mary Guards then marched out of the church, and, having performed some military evolutions, proceeded to the usual place of rendezvous.
Ranaway --From the subscriber, on Monday, the 5th inst. a Negro Woman, named Betty. Said woman is about 5 feet 3 inches high, dark complected, wish a lighter shade on both cheeks I believe she is now somewhere in the town of Sidney, as she was last heard of in the neighborhood of Mr. Pace's A reward of five Dollars will be paid for her delivery to me, or if placed in any jail, so that I can get her again Joseph Davis, au 8--ts 214 Broad street
Ranaway --From the subscriber, on Monday, the 5th inst., a Negro Woman, named Betty. Said woman is about 5 feet 3 inches high, dark complected, with a lighter shade on both cheeks. I believe she is now somewhere in the town of Sidney, as she was last heard of in the neighborhood of Mr. Pace's. A reward of five Dollars will be paid for her delivery to me, or if placed in any jail, so that I can get her again. Joseph Davis, 214 Broad street. au 8--ts
Ranaway --From the subscriber, on Monday, the 6th inst. a Negro Woman, named Betty. Said woman is about 5 feet 2 inches high, dark completed, with a lighter shade on both checks. I believe she is now somewhere in the town of Sidney, as she was last heard of in the neighborhood of Mr. Pace's A reward of five dollars will be paid for her delivery to me, or if placed in any jail, so that I can get her again. Joseph Davis, au 8--ts 214 Broad street
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