Your search returned 29 results in 11 document sections:

1 2
ichard (1), m. Mary Buckmaster, or Buckminster, 24 May 1688, and had Benjamin, b. 28 Ap. 1689; Isaac, bap. 10 Oct. 1697; Joseph, b. 21 Feb. 1699-1700; John, b. 16 Aug. 1702, d. 13 Sept. 1702; William, b. 11 Oct. 1703; Anne, b. 14 May 1705, m. Matthew Davis of Pomfret 17 Nov. 1726; Sarah, b. 14 May 1705, m. Gamaliel Rogers 14 Ap. 1726; Jedediah, b. 11 Feb. 1707-8; Mary, b.——, d. 21 Oct. 1712, and perhaps others. Benjamin the f. resided on the south side of the river, and d. 13 Aug. 1738, a. 78;in New England 12 Nov. 1669, and purchased the farm in Billerica, 700 acres, belongings to Cambridge Church. He remained in Billerica several years, and is said to have resided subsequently in Andover. No record is found of wife or children. Davis, Dolor (Dolard, Dollard, and Doller, on the Record), owned a house lot, in 1635, on the easterly side of Dunster Street, between Winthrop and South streets. he removed early; was a proprietor of Groton in 1656, and an early planter of Barnstable
ichard (1), m. Mary Buckmaster, or Buckminster, 24 May 1688, and had Benjamin, b. 28 Ap. 1689; Isaac, bap. 10 Oct. 1697; Joseph, b. 21 Feb. 1699-1700; John, b. 16 Aug. 1702, d. 13 Sept. 1702; William, b. 11 Oct. 1703; Anne, b. 14 May 1705, m. Matthew Davis of Pomfret 17 Nov. 1726; Sarah, b. 14 May 1705, m. Gamaliel Rogers 14 Ap. 1726; Jedediah, b. 11 Feb. 1707-8; Mary, b.——, d. 21 Oct. 1712, and perhaps others. Benjamin the f. resided on the south side of the river, and d. 13 Aug. 1738, a. 78;in New England 12 Nov. 1669, and purchased the farm in Billerica, 700 acres, belongings to Cambridge Church. He remained in Billerica several years, and is said to have resided subsequently in Andover. No record is found of wife or children. Davis, Dolor (Dolard, Dollard, and Doller, on the Record), owned a house lot, in 1635, on the easterly side of Dunster Street, between Winthrop and South streets. he removed early; was a proprietor of Groton in 1656, and an early planter of Barnstable
President Davis. --We understand that this distinguished warrior and statesman, the gallant representative of a glorious cause and people, will be here this evening or Sunday morning. The news that he is certainly coming carries a thrill of joy to every Southern heart.
her altars and her fires," and is threatened with invasion by the Northern goths and vandals, but one feeling animates our entire people — to fly to her rescue, and give their hearts blood, it necessary, in her defence. We have, in our own little city of modern Rome, three of the best drilled and best equipped volunteer companies in the State, numbering nearly one hundred men each, as brave soldiers as ever pulled a trigger or unsheathed a sword, who have tendered their services to General Davis, and have been accepted and ordered to Virginia. They leave here the last of this week or the first of next. I ask for them a cordial reception from the citizens of Richmond, which, I learn, is to be their rendezvous for the present. Quite a number of the officers and privates are young men sons of our best families, who are yet in a state of single blessedness. This announcement, I know, will secure for them the bewitching smiles of the bewitching young ladies of your city. I am a
A bald eagle killed. --Mr. Matthew Davis, on the 24th of April, killed, on the South Fork, in this county, a bald eagle, measuring seven feet from tip to tip. It made a swoop at a child just before Mr. Davis shot it. A friend at our elbow suggests that this is the National eagle that has probably made his escape from Washingtthe 24th of April, killed, on the South Fork, in this county, a bald eagle, measuring seven feet from tip to tip. It made a swoop at a child just before Mr. Davis shot it. A friend at our elbow suggests that this is the National eagle that has probably made his escape from Washington. It so, Davis "got him."--Abingdon Virginian. the 24th of April, killed, on the South Fork, in this county, a bald eagle, measuring seven feet from tip to tip. It made a swoop at a child just before Mr. Davis shot it. A friend at our elbow suggests that this is the National eagle that has probably made his escape from Washington. It so, Davis "got him."--Abingdon Virginian.
Gens. Bail. --The only transaction by the police yesterday was the arrest, on a warrant by Officer Blankinship, of an old man named John McGinness, for threats of personal violence towards Matthew Davis. He gave bail.
rs did not appear to explode. One of the shells exploded immediately on leaving the gun, the boiling up of the water close in to the Virginia shore indicating where the fragments fell. After wasting a great deal of powder the rebels ceased firing, thus concluding the morning service. In the afternoon they opened fire again, the shells bursting as in the morning, with the certainty of a "nobody hurt." The battery at Budd's Ferry did not return the fire. The bridge burners. Of President Davis's threat in relation to the Missouri bridge burners, the Herald says: It is probable that the news of the recent order of the War Department, directing the privateersmen to be regarded as prisoners of war, had not reached rebeldom when this last message was sent from Richmond. The sentiment expressed by those who know the purport of the message is, that the officer who brought it, thereby disgracing the flag of truce; should have been retained and hung with the bridge burners.
The Hampton Legion. --President Davis has authorized Col. Wade Hampton to extend his Legion, and to expand his command to a brigade. The Colonel will soon call for regiments and companies to fill out his number. Under its new organization, the command will enter into the service for the war.
The Green-Eyed Monster. --Thos. McGinness was held to bail in $200 by the Mayor on Saturday for threatening to immolate Matthew Davis. He charged the latter with having destroyed the peace of his family, wrecked their hopes, &c.
place too soon; Information has been received that the day after that place was evacuated by the Kansas First regiment the rebels cut down the American flag. On the Sunday following the notorious Joe. Shelby, with a gang of freebooters, took possession of the town. All the troops along the line of the Pacific Railroad, west of Jefferson City, are under marching orders. The Nebraska First regiment is going across the country to Kansas. A number of regiments are going south to join General Davis, and Brigadier-General Steel's brigade is coming down the road to be forwarded to Kentucky. Gen. Pope will remain and make his headquarters at Jefferson City. The Maryland Legislature. In the Maryland Senate a bill was reported to pay the Government Police in Baltimore. A bill was reported from the Judiciary Committee providing for taking the sense of the people as to the propriety of holding a Convention to frame a new Constitution. In the House, Mr. Johnson reported a bi
1 2