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Varina Davis, Jefferson Davis: Ex-President of the Confederate States of America, A Memoir by his Wife, Volume 2 8 2 Browse Search
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d him well after the fall of the Confederacy. Soon after our return from Paris, our skilful and wise physician, Dr. Maurice Davis, discovered that Mr. Davis's heart trouble had not decreased, and he ordered him up to Scotland, whither Dr. MackayMr. Davis's heart trouble had not decreased, and he ordered him up to Scotland, whither Dr. Mackay, the poet, kindly consented to accompany him. While visiting our friends, the Abingers, and several gentlemen whose acquaintance he made in Scotland, and during a more protracted visit to his friend, James Smith, of Glasgow, who had given a finters from Scotland were charming. I regret that space is lacking to give some of them. In the course of the autumn Mr. Davis was offered the presidency of a life insurance company and though something else would have been preferable to him, our and sailed for America. After remaining some months in Memphis, where he was received in the most enthusiastic manner, Mr.Davis came to London for me, to set up our new home in Memphis. On the eve of our departure he heard by cable of the death of
Varina Davis, Jefferson Davis: Ex-President of the Confederate States of America, A Memoir by his Wife, Volume 2, Chapter 77: the Wreck of the Pacific.—the Mississippi Valley Society. (search)
r the marriage of our daughter Margaret to Mr. J. A. Hayes, he went to England to confer with the English company, and took our little daughter Winnie and me with him, and with us the child of a dear friend, who was to be left at school in Germany. The hedge-rows of old England were pranked out in their spring garments of pink May, and looked very lovely to us after our long absence. Though Mr. Davis seemed much better in health and his cheerfulness increased, a severe illness of several months and the unremitting attention he paid me, with the failure of his project of forming the company, reduced his newly acquired health. Capital is too timid to embark in any scheme of which the profits are at the end of a long perspective. The ships to carry the trade were not promised and the effort failed. In the autumn Mr. Davis returned home alone, as I was too ill to bear the journey or leave the proximity of Dr. Maurice Davis, of London, our kind and skilful friend of years ago.