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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 11 3 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 31. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 3 1 Browse Search
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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The battle of New Market, Va., May 15th, 1864. (search)
tle menaced that I had only my own brigade of cavalry and mounted infantry and General Gabriel C. Wharton's infantry brigade, McClanahan's six-gun battery, McNeill's Rangers, and two small battalions of cavalry under Major Harry Gilmor and Major Sturgis Davis, of Maryland; in all not exceeding three thousand effective men of all arms. I was a native of the valley, acquainted with nearly all its leading inhabitants, and perfectly familiar with the natural features and resources of the entire di. I had with me the 62d Virginia Infantry, mounted, Colonel Geo. H. Smith; the 23d Virginia Cavalry, Colonel Robert White; the 18th Virginia Cavalry, Colonel George W. Imboden; Major Harry Gilmor's Maryland battalion of cavalry; a part of Major Sturgis Davis's Maryland battalion of cavalry, Captain J. H. McNeill's Rangers, Captain J. H. McClanahan's excellent six-gun battery of horse artillery, and Captain Bartlett's Valley District Signal Corps. I had ordered General Wm. H. Harman at Staunto
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., Sigel in the Shenandoah Valley in 1864. (search)
aster should furnish transportation for Breckinridge and staff and 16 horses. Another and later dispatch, dated Staunton, and signed by Breckinridge, directed Captain Davis, at Woodstock, to find out the strength of our forces. A third dispatch directed Captain Davis to watch particularly any movement of ours in the direction of Captain Davis to watch particularly any movement of ours in the direction of Grant's army. Another dispatch, dated Staunton, May 10th, also to Captain Davis, stated that General Lee was driving the enemy at every point. The anxiety of Breckinridge to know whether there was any movement in the direction of Grant's army suggested such a movement on our part, while the unfavorable news relative to the greaCaptain Davis, stated that General Lee was driving the enemy at every point. The anxiety of Breckinridge to know whether there was any movement in the direction of Grant's army suggested such a movement on our part, while the unfavorable news relative to the great struggle between Grant and Lee could not fail to prompt me to energetic action. To gain more detailed information, two regiments of infantry, under Colonel Augustus Moor, assisted by five hundred of the 1st New York (Lincoln) Cavalry, under Major Timothy Quinn, were sent forward on the 13th. This force met a part of Imboden's
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The opposing forces at New Market, Va., May 15, 1864. (search)
y Section, Lieut. C. H. Minge. Cavalry, Imboden's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. John D. Imboden: 62d Va. (mounted infantry), Col. George I. Smith; 23d Va., Col. Robert White; 18th Va., Col. George W. Imboden; Gilmor's Maryland Battalion, Maj. Harry Gilmor; Davis's Maryland Battalion (detachment), Maj. Sturgis Davis; Partisan Rangers, Capt. John H. McNeill; McClanahan's Va. Battery, Capt. J. H. McClanahan. In an address delivered at the anniversary celebration of the battle General Echols referred to tMaj. Sturgis Davis; Partisan Rangers, Capt. John H. McNeill; McClanahan's Va. Battery, Capt. J. H. McClanahan. In an address delivered at the anniversary celebration of the battle General Echols referred to the bravery of a company of Missourians who were in the battle. They were 70 in number, and, according to the Rockingham register of May 20th, 1864, they lost 47 in killed and wounded. The strength of Breckinridge's forces was about 5000. General Sigel, in an estimate based on the official reports, places Breckinridge's strength at 4816, as follows: Wharton's brigade, 1578; Echols's brigade, 1622; engineer co., 56; cadet corps, 227; company of Missourians, 70; Jackson's battery, 100; Chapman'
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 31. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.10 (search)
te; the Eighteenth Virginia Cavalry, by the General's brother, Colonel George W. Imboden, now a prominent lawyer in West Virginia; White's Battalion, by Major Robert White, late Attorney-General of West Virginia; the Maryland Battalion, by Major Sturgis Davis, of Maryland, who had won his laurels under Turner Ashby; Gilmor's Battalion of Rangers, by Harry Gilmor, of Baltimore, who was as rough and daring a rider as ever drew a saber; McNeil's Rangers, of Hardy and Hampshire counties, West Virgiind Stuart there, as we expected, our scouts reporting that he could not cross the Shenandoah river on account of high water. The General decided to attack Charlestown alone, if he could find out what was there. A council of war was held and Major Davis volunteered to go to the vicinity of Charlestown and find out. To this the General agreed, and went into camp to take a short rest before his return. The Major knew two renegade Southerners who lived within a mile of the place, and he aroused