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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 31. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 4 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Maryland line. (search)
y be amended at any regular monthly meeting of the Association, provided two-thirds of all the members then present assent to such amendment. I find among my Confederate papers, and in Major Frank A. Bond's handwriting, the following list of the officers elected on the 8th of June, 1861; all of whom, if my memory serves me correctly, were present at the organization of the Association. Coleman Yellott, President. Dr. Charles A. Harding, Vice President. B. S. White, R. H. Archer, T. Sturgis Davis, Frank A. Bond, Geo. R. Garther, Jr., James A. Kemer, Council. Horace E. Hayden, Secretary. B. S. White, Treasurer. The Association failed. Why I know not; and the Howard county troops, known as the Maryland cavalry, June 15, 1861, left Leesburg to join the command of Colonel Angus McDonald at Romney. This company subsequently became the basis of the first battalion of Maryland cavalry under Colonel Ridgley Brown.--(Southern Historical Society Papers, V. 251.) Wilkes Barr
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 31. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.10 (search)
was a distinguished citizen, always. Many there are who see in all this something like retributive fate. And observing minds have noted coincidences during and since that hateful war, indicating retribution following dark deeds done. Majors Harry Gilmor and T. Sturgis Davis were Baltimore county men, and Colonel B. L. Simpson—whom Gilmor defeated and chased—was from Baltimore city. Many Marylanders, too, were under Gilmor and Davis, and were scattered through General Imboden's command.was a distinguished citizen, always. Many there are who see in all this something like retributive fate. And observing minds have noted coincidences during and since that hateful war, indicating retribution following dark deeds done. Majors Harry Gilmor and T. Sturgis Davis were Baltimore county men, and Colonel B. L. Simpson—whom Gilmor defeated and chased—was from Baltimore city. Many Marylanders, too, were under Gilmor and Davis, and were scattered through General Imboden's