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D. H. Hill, Jr., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 4, North Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 65 1 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2 12 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Mass. officers and men who died. 6 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: October 21, 1863., [Electronic resource] 4 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: August 26, 1862., [Electronic resource] 4 0 Browse Search
Lucius R. Paige, History of Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1630-1877, with a genealogical register 4 0 Browse Search
Benjamin Cutter, William R. Cutter, History of the town of Arlington, Massachusetts, ormerly the second precinct in Cambridge, or District of Menotomy, afterward the town of West Cambridge. 1635-1879 with a genealogical register of the inhabitants of the precinct. 3 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 3 1 Browse Search
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 2 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 24. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
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ed a proclamation, paying a tribute to the dead soldiers of that State and calling for the enlistment of more men.--A large and spirited meeting was held this morning in Market Square, Providence, to express the determination of Rhode Island, to redouble its exertions in support of the Government. Mayor Knight presided, and eloquent speeches were made by lion. L. A. Jenckes, Rev. Dr. Sears, Hon. C. A. Updyke, Bishop Clark, Rev. Dr. Caswell, Bishop McFarland, A. Payne, Governor Hoppin, Hon. Thos. Davis, P. A. Sennott, Dr. Wayland, ex-Mayor Rodman, Rev. Dr. Hall, Rev. Mr. Keyers, and Governor Arnold.--(Doc. 116.) The Third and Fourth Regiments of Massachusetts Volunteers, who have been on duty at Fortress Monroe, Va., returned to Boston.--N. Y. Times, July 21. Major General McClellan, under instructions from the War Department at Washington, this morning left Beverly, Va., to assume the command of the Federal forces on the Potomac in Virginia. His departure was announced in
July 27. Major-General Robert Patterson, of the Pennsylvania Volunteers, was honorably discharged from the service of the United States.--(Doc. 106.) The Odd Fellows' Hall, jail, and four other buildings in Hampton, Va., were burned by the national troops in apprehension of an immediate attack by the secessionists.--N. Y. Times, July 30. In Confederate Congress, at Richmond, Va., documents were read which show the cause of the late flag of truce from the Confederate lines to Washington. One of these was a letter from Davis to President Lincoln, with the threat of retaliation if the privateersmen taken from the Savannah should be hanged.--(Doc. 128.) The Sixty-ninth Regiment N. Y. S. M., arrived in New York from the seat of war.--N. Y. Express, July 27. Senator Johnson, of Tennessee, spoke in the Senate in favor of the joint resolution to approve the acts of the President.--(Doc. 129.)
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2, Chapter 6: the schism.—1840. (search)
delegates. There is to be a desperate struggle for political power in that meeting, unless something occurs to prevent. Write to friends in Connecticut. See Thomas Davis and Wm. Chace; Chace and Davis were brothers-in-law, and both of Providence; the latter a native of Ireland, a manufacturing jeweller, and afterwards (1853-Davis were brothers-in-law, and both of Providence; the latter a native of Ireland, a manufacturing jeweller, and afterwards (1853-55) a Representative in Congress. His wife was a very dear friend of Mrs. Garrison. get them to stir. The abolitionists, the working ones, in Western New York are determined to cut loose from the State Society, and form a society for Western New York. They are not willing that Myron Holley, Gerrit Smith, Wm. L. Chaplin, and Wm. d this he composed as follows, with an obviously liberal representation of Third Party and New Organization: W. L. Garrison, chairman; Ichabod Codding (Maine); Thomas Davis (Rhode Island); Rowland T. Robinson (Vermont); Amos A. Phelps, Abby Kelley (Massachusetts); William L. Chaplin, Lewis Tappan (New York); Charles C. Burleigh, C
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2, Chapter 8: the Chardon-Street Convention.—1840. (search)
al districts, reading notices and praying for the slaves. He could hardly credit it. How could it be? As it might be in your parish, I said, where doubtless the wealthy deacons' fishing-schooners carry salt fish to the plantations, and dread to lose the trade. I'll try it! he replied. Then be prepared, I answered, to take the consequences that are showered down upon every anti-slavery minister. He did try it and took the consequences. Henry C. Wright, Abby Kelley, William Bassett, Thomas Davis, Oliver Johnson, and many others; thus representing the Groton Convention, the Non-Resistant Convention, the old anti-slavery organization, and the Transcendental wing of the Unitarian denomination. As we have said, Mr. Garrison's name was conspicuous by its absence, but in the eyes of the New Organizers and the public at large he was constructively at the bottom of the whole thing. As the Standard (perhaps through N. P. Rogers) truthfully pointed out, in another connection: Garris
[b. West Indies], 1.342; aid in buying Thoughts on Colon., 312; agent of Lib., 325.—Letter to I. Knapp, 1.325. Centinel (Boston), 2.5. Chace, Elizabeth Buffum, 1.398. Chace, William M., a Providence abolitionist, 1.314, brother-in-law of T. Davis, 2.340; call from G., 46; visits N. Y., 348, 359; speaks at Springfield Convention, 419.—Letter to G. W. Benson, 2.354. Chandler, Elizabeth M. [d. 1834], 1.145. Channing, William Ellery, Rev. [1780-1842], his person, 1.357, uncle of W. H. 8. Davis, Edward Morris [b. Philadelphia, July 21, 1811], Letters to G., 2.21; from C. C. Burleigh, 2.124. Davis, Jefferson [b. 1808], 2.59. Davis, John [1787-1854], silent before Preston, 2.247: possible candidate for V. P., 314. Davis, Thomas, at annual meeting Am. A. S. S., 2.340, 348; calls Chardon St. Convention, 422. Dawes, William, 2.377. Dawson, W. C., 1.248. Denison, Charles W., Rev. [b. Stonington, Conn., Nov. 5, 1812; d. Washington, Nov. 13, 1881], edits World in Phi
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 2: the Irish address.—1842. (search)
an actual old-countryman, told how he stood in our Irish House of Peers when Castlereagh took the bribe for the betrayal of Ireland. Feb. 5, 1800. Wendell Phillips, with only the credentials of his eloquence, joined in what (but for its sincerity) might be called the blarney of the occasion. To no purpose, so far as the immediate object was concerned. On February 27, 1842, Mr. Garrison (whose Irish descent might also have been paraded) wrote to Ante, 1.14. Richard Webb by the hand of Thomas Davis: Ante, 2.340. Our meeting in Faneuil Hall, to unroll the Irish Address, Ms. with its sixty thousand signatures, was indescribably enthusiastic, and has produced a great impression on the public mind. I am sorry to add, and you will be not less ashamed to hear, that the two Irish papers in Boston sneer at the Address, and Lib. 12.27, 29, 33. denounce it and the abolitionists in true pro-slavery style. I fear they will keep the great mass of your countrymen here Lib. 13.19, 29. fr
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Mass. officers and men who died., List of Massachusetts officers and soldiers who died of wounds. (search)
2d Mass. Inf.,Shepherdstown, Va., Sept. 20, 1862.Fredericksburg, Va., Sept. 20, 1862. Davis, George L.,22d Mass. Inf.,Petersburg, Va., June 18, 1864.Washington, D. C., July 25, 1864. Davis, George W.,21st Mass. Inf.,Antietam, Md.,Antietam, Md., Sept. 26, 1862. Davis, Henry A.,21st Mass. Inf.,– –Kenton County, Ky., April 17, 1864. Davis, James J. P.,27th Mass. Inf.,– –Point Lookout, Md., June 20, 1864. Davis, Obed R.,36th Mass. Inf.,Spotsylvania, Va.,Spotsylvania, Va., May 12, 1864. Davis, Thomas,7th Mass. Inf.,Wilderness, Va., May 6, 1864.May, 1864. Davis, Walter R.,12th Mass. Inf.,Dec. 13, 1862,Grosvenor Hosp., Alexandria, Va., Dec. 26, 1862. Dawes, William H., Sergt.,9th Batt. Mass. L. A.,Petersburg, Va., June 18, 1864.Near Avery House, Petersburg, Va., June 21, 1864. Day, Charles,23d Mass. Inf.,Cold Harbor, Va., June, 1864.Alexandria, Va., June 26, 1864. Day, Edward L.,15th Mass. Inf.,Antietam, Md., Sept. 17, 1862.Antietam, Md., Sept. 20, 1862. Day, John,39th Mass. Inf.
2d Mass. Inf.,Shepherdstown, Va., Sept. 20, 1862.Fredericksburg, Va., Sept. 20, 1862. Davis, George L.,22d Mass. Inf.,Petersburg, Va., June 18, 1864.Washington, D. C., July 25, 1864. Davis, George W.,21st Mass. Inf.,Antietam, Md.,Antietam, Md., Sept. 26, 1862. Davis, Henry A.,21st Mass. Inf.,– –Kenton County, Ky., April 17, 1864. Davis, James J. P.,27th Mass. Inf.,– –Point Lookout, Md., June 20, 1864. Davis, Obed R.,36th Mass. Inf.,Spotsylvania, Va.,Spotsylvania, Va., May 12, 1864. Davis, Thomas,7th Mass. Inf.,Wilderness, Va., May 6, 1864.May, 1864. Davis, Walter R.,12th Mass. Inf.,Dec. 13, 1862,Grosvenor Hosp., Alexandria, Va., Dec. 26, 1862. Dawes, William H., Sergt.,9th Batt. Mass. L. A.,Petersburg, Va., June 18, 1864.Near Avery House, Petersburg, Va., June 21, 1864. Day, Charles,23d Mass. Inf.,Cold Harbor, Va., June, 1864.Alexandria, Va., June 26, 1864. Day, Edward L.,15th Mass. Inf.,Antietam, Md., Sept. 17, 1862.Antietam, Md., Sept. 20, 1862. Day, John,39th Mass. Inf.
vis, G. T., 81 Davis, G. W., 451 Davis, George, 451 Davis, H. A., 451 Davis. H. F., 65 Davis, J. G., 510 Davis, J. H., 352 Davis, J. J. P., 451 Davis, J. M., 352 Davis, James, 37th Mass. Inf., 352 Davis, James, 55th Mass. Inf., 352 Davis, L. M., 352 Davis, Levi, 352 Davis, Lorenzo, 352 Davis, M. S., 510 Davis, N. H., 52, 208 Davis, O. L., 352 Davis, O. R., 451 Davis, P. A., 186 Davis, P. S., 21, 115, 270, 352 Davis, Robert, 352 Davis, S. A., 352 Davis, T. B., 510 Davis, Thomas, 451 Davis, W. G., 510 Davis, Walter R., 451 Davis, William, 352 Davis, William R., 64 Davyson, W., 510 Dawes, W. H., 451 Dawson, A. E., 352 Dawson, S. W., 510 Day, Abraham, Jr., 510 Day, Charles, 451 Day, D. B., 510 Day, Dennis, 510 Day, E. E., 53, 352 Day, E. L., 451 Day, Henry, 352 Day, J. D., 451 Day, J. F., 4th Mass. Cav. 510 Day, J. F., Corp., 4th Mass. Cav. 510 Day, J. G., 352 Day, John, 11th U. S. Inf., 510 Day, John, 20th Mass. Inf., 352 Day, John, 39th M
Anna Cutter, bap. 30 Oct. 1791; Maria, bap. 27 July 1794, d. 10 Feb. 1795; Maria, bap. 15 Oct. 1797; Ebenezer Francis, bap. 25 Aug. 1799, d. 13 Dec. 1804. Thomas the f. res. in Menotomy, and d. 22 Sept. 1805; his w. Susanna d. 11 Oct. 1818, a. 57. 29. Amos, s. of Thomas (20), m. Helen Weston 18 June 1781, and had Amos, b. 16 Ap. 1782; Timothy, b. 10 Mar. 1784; Helen, b. 29 July 1786, d. 17 Nov. 1787; Helen, b. 21 Ap. 1788, m. Jonas Prentiss 22 Feb. 1807; Clarissa, b. 3 Nov. 1789, m. Thomas Davis 2 Oct. 1808, d. 11 May 1814; Harriet, b. 6 Ap. 1792, d. 9 Sept. 1802; Nancy, b. 1 May 1794, d. 25 Sept. 1802; Gershom, b. 20 Jan. 1796; Henry, b. 1 Sept. 1798; Letitia, b. 26 Mar. 1799, m. Horatio H. Fiske 2 Mar. 1818; Mary, b. 2 Sept. 1801, d. 24 Aug. 1802; Harriet, b. 13 Aug. 1806, m. Herman Foster 8 Nov. 1826. Amos the f. resided in Menotomy, and was widely renowned as a card maker, and inventor of a machine for that purpose. He d. 27 Mar. 1828; his w. Helen d. 15 Oct. 1829. 30. W
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