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Varina Davis, Jefferson Davis: Ex-President of the Confederate States of America, A Memoir by his Wife, Volume 2, Chapter 43: visit to New Orleans and admission to Fortress Monroe. (search)
e E. Cooper, Surgeon United States Army. Mrs. Varina Davis, Fortress Monroe, Va. This was sent topparently for the specific duty of jailor to Mr. Davis, and the relief was great to us. General BurAs soon as our friends knew they could visit Mr. Davis, they came almost every day. Our great Genern parties came to the fort still to peer at Mr. Davis, and one day a vulgarian inquired of Frederibut cannot receive people as guests who hold Mr. Davis a prisoner. What this judicious, capable, dlatter our beloved pastor, came often to see Mr. Davis, as well as charming people from Baltimore,a vote of 105 yeas to 19 nays, resolved that Mr. Davis should be held in custody as a prisoner and a trial according to the laws of the land. Mr. Davis, in the meantime, was exceedingly anxious toourt in Virginia approached, the counsel for Mr. Davis, encouraged by his devoted and faithful wife individual seeking the executive clemency. Mr. Davis, on the other hand, always said, to ask for [7 more...]
of Petersburg:-- Montgomery, Ala., April 29, 1861. my dear young ladies: Permit me, before thanking you for your kind present, and wishes for my husband's welfare, to congratulate you upon the secession of Virginia — the birthplace of my mother, as well as yours. The elder, and honored sister of the Southern States, is received with tearful joy among us, and many hands wilt fashion stars with which to mark this brilliant accession to our galaxy. The possession of a work-box manufactured by little Southern girls, so industrious, so enthusiastic, and so patriotic, will be much prized by me; and I will leave it to my daughter with the note which precedes it, as a precious legacy. Long ere you reach the responsibility of a useful womanhood, may we have united peace to independence in our Southern Confederacy. Wishing you, my dear young friends, a long, a happy life, I have the honor to be, Very gratefully and sincerely, Your friend, Varina Davis. --Idem.
duced, are, beyond all doubt, Hicks, Scott, and Harney. We place them in the order of their infamy. Hicks ranks his confederates by long odds. Scott and Harney have some palliation in the fact of their being mercenaries, and in their carnal weakness. But in Hicks' villainy there are no mitigating circumstances — no plea of human frailty. His treachery was deliberate, cold-blooded, cowardly, and hypocritical. Before the incensed populace of Baltimore, he quailed into submission, abjured his Unionism, and declared unqualifiedly his determination to resist the Lincoln invasion to the death. The threats for vengeance against the Yankee murderers of Baltimore citizens has hardly died away, before he slunk off to Winter Davis' den, and set to work concocting a plan to betray Maryland into Lincoln's hands. The men of the South, unfortunately, trusted his assurances, and now Baltimore and Maryland are suffering the penalty of their credulity and weakness.--New Orleans Delta, May 28.
secessionist, P. 21; wishes a cessation of hostilities, D. 100; his advertisement for coffins, P. 42; Norwich editors, present to, P. 24; at Charleston, Feb. 25, P. 23; compared with Lincoln, P. 128; a method of disposing of, P. 131; personal appearance of, P. 24; a Boston sculptor's offer for, P. 96; remarks on anti-slavery, Int. 46; supposed correspondence with Gov. Magoffin, P. 125; see the traitor's plot, P. 39; epigram on, P. 113 Davis, —, Lieut., at Fort Moultrie, D. 6 Davis, Varina, wife of Jefferson Davis, letter from, P. 71 Day, William F., D. 84 Daylight, steamer, D. 48 Dayton, N. L., D. 85; Doc. 191 Dayton, O., Child's rifle co. of, D. 33 Dean, Gilbert, Doc. 135 Dean, William, Rhode Island, D. 45 Declaration of Independence, recognizes a People, Int. 11 Delaware refuses to join the S. C., D. 9; added to the military department of Washington, D. 33; volunteers from, D. 46 De Mille, James, P. 73 Davison, Mary A., P
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Memoir of Jane Claudia Johnson. (search)
welfare: Fort Monroe, Sept. 14, 1865. Mrs. Varina Davis, Augusta, Ga.: Mr. Davis suffered temr of the Rebellion, 747.) About this time Mr. Davis wrote a letter to his wife, which the Major-y in the official intercourse with and about Mrs. Davis, who, with womanly and wifely instinct, was I was under obligations to Mr. and also Mrs. Davis for kindness and courtesy received before the death of my eldest son, murdered by one of Mr. Davis' assassins, called guerillas, my position asfor me to enter into any correspondence with Mrs. Davis or to attempt to interfere in the course of he grace, however, to ask the officer to let Mrs. Davis know that her husband was better. Because h Charles Minnigerode asked permission to see Mr. Davis as his spiritual adviser, which request, aft comfortable. On the 25th of April, 1866, Mrs. Davis, whose letters had remained unanswered, hear War, and he ordered General Miles to permit Mrs. Davis to visit her husband, under such restriction[2 more...]
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The trials and trial of Jefferson Davis. (search)
4, 1865. Mrs. Varina Davis, Augusta, Ga.: Mr. Davis suffered temporarily from a carbuncle on ther of the Rebellion, 747.) About this time Mr. Davis wrote a letter to his wife, which the Major-y in the official intercourse with and about Mrs. Davis, who, with womanly and wifely instinct, was I was under obligations to Mr. and also Mrs. Davis for kindness and courtesy received before the death of my eldest son, murdered by one of Mr. Davis' assassins, called guerillas, my position asfor me to enter into any correspondence with Mrs. Davis or to attempt to interfere in the course of he grace, however, to ask the officer to let Mrs. Davis know that her husband was better. Because h Charles Minnigerode asked permission to see Mr. Davis as his spiritual adviser, which request, aftresentation of the medical officer attending Mr. Davis, he was removed to a very much better room i War, and he ordered General Miles to permit Mrs. Davis to visit her husband, under such restriction[2 more...]
The Daily Dispatch: may 18, 1861., [Electronic resource], Graceful letter from our President's wife (search)
c misses of this city: Montgomery,Ala., April. 29, 1861. My Dear Young Ladies. --Permit me, before thanking you for your kind present and wishes for my husband's welfare, to congratulate you upon the secession of Virginia — the birthplace of my mother, as well as yours. The elder and honored sister of the Southern States is received with fearful joy among us, and many hands will fashion stars with which to mark this brilliant accession to our galaxy. The possession of a work box manufactured by little Southern girls, so industrious, so enthusiastic, and so patriotic, will be much prized by me, and I will leave it to my daughter, with the note which precedes it, as a precious legacy. Long are you reach the responsibility of a useful womanhood, may we have united peace to independence in our Southern Confederacy. Wishing you, my dear young friends, a long, a happy life, I have the honor to be, Your friend, Varina Davis. Very gratefully and sincerely,