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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 62 6 Browse Search
General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox 30 2 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 3. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 16 2 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 3 1 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 2 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 24. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2.. You can also browse the collection for Benjamin F. Davis or search for Benjamin F. Davis in all documents.

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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., The opposing forces in the operations at New Orleans, La. (search)
neral Quitman, Capt. Alexander Grant         2       2 River Defense Boats.                   Warrior, Capt. John A. Stephenson         1       1 Stonewall Jackson, Capt. Geo. W. Philips           1     1 Defiance, Capt. Joseph D. McCoy         1       1 Resolute, Capt. Isaac Hooper       1 1       2 General Lovell, Capt. Burdett Paris         1       1 R. J. Breckinridge, Capt. James Smith.           1     1 Total 2 4 4 10 15 2 1 2 40 Unarmed tugs. Landis, Captain Davis, and W. Burton, Captain Hammond (tenders to the Louisiana); Phoenix, Captain James Brown (tender to the Manassas); Mosher, Captain Sherman, and Belle Algerine, Captain Jackson (k); Music, Captain McClellan (tender to the forts); Star, Captain Laplace (telegraph boat). The last four were chartered by the army. Grand total of Confederate guns, 166. Confederate Army. Major-General Mansfield Lovell. Coast defenses, Brig.-Gen. Johnson
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., Farragut's demands for the surrender of New Orleans. (search)
ervously clutching the strings of the howitzers, he called my attention to their excited appearance, and remarked that it was as much as he could do to restrain them from firing on the crowd, and should he attempt to haul that flag down, it would be impossible to keep them within bounds. This conversation, which was quite informal, did not at the time assume in my estimation the importance lent to it by subsequent events which occurred after I left the city as bearer of dispatches to President Davis at Richmond. In the excitement of the next few hours and the anomalous multiplication of my duties, it is possible that I may have even neglected to report it to the mayor, but it is certain that the impression obtained at the City Hall that the act was entirely unauthorized. Parton, whose account of the capture of the city is, in some respects, very incorrect, and who makes the tearing down of the United States flag from the Mint occur on Sunday the 27th, instead of Saturday the 26th
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., chapter 5.26 (search)
rear, and coming up as fast as circumstances would permit. effectual resistance. He claims that the battle was unfinished in consequence of the disabling of their commander [Johnston], and states that after he was disabled, the only thing President Davis ought to have done, or had time to do, was postponed almost twenty hours--the putting General Lee, who was near, in command of the army. General Johnston also states that three Federal corps on the Richmond side were completely separated a sharp skirmish reported by General Pickett as he was retiring, under the orders of General Lee, to resume our former position. Without dwelling upon what might have happened if General Johnston had not been disabled, or discussing what President Davis ought to have done, or had time to do, it is proposed to show that General Johnston is greatly in error in reference to the positions of the contending forces on the morning of June 1st, and to present evidence that will refresh General Long
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., Hanover Court House and Gaines's Mill. (search)
in earnest or that I had greatly misjudged the situation. This shows how suddenly the tide may turn in battle and on what little incidents success may depend. The forces arrayed against us, and especially those which had thus far been launched upon my command, were the chosen of Southern manhood from Maryland to Texas. No braver or more spirited body of men was to be found among the Confederates, or any who more strongly believed in their own invincibility. The known presence of President Davis and General Lee, to oversee, direct, encourage, and urge, was another influential power in favor of the Confederates in this movement.--F. J. P. Their general officers, from the chief down, had been selected for earnest devotion to their cause, and well-earned reputation for intelligent and energetic performance of duty in other fields. With few exceptions they had been my personal friends, and many of them my intimate associates. In the varied relations to them as subaltern, as instr
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., Lee's attacks north of the Chickahominy. (search)
at village ready to receive Hill. My division being nearest the bridge, Longstreet ordered me to cross first. Some delay was made in repairing the bridge, and A. P. Hill became hotly engaged before we could get to his relief. At this time President Davis and staff hurried past us, going to the sound of the firing. Ripley's brigade was pushed forward to the support of three batteries of artillery of Major H. P. Jones's battalion, and the two under Captains R. A. Hardaway and J. W. Bondurant.hey could have been halted at Mechanicsville until Jackson had turned the works on the creek, an d all that waste of blood could have been avoided. Ripley's brigade was sent to the assistance of Pender, by the direct order, through me, of both Mr. Davis and General Lee. They both felt pressing upon them the vast importance of keeping near Richmond, and of opening up communications with it as soon as possible. The crossing of the river by General A. P. Hill before hearing from Jackson precipi
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., chapter 7.51 (search)
ng was quiet on my part of the line, except occasional firing between my pickets and it McCall's I was in momentary expectation of the signal. About half-past 2 o'clock artillery firing was heard on my left, evidently at the point near White Oak Swamp where Huger was to attack. I very naturally supposed this firing to be the expected signa], and ordered some of my batteries to reply, as a signal that I was ready to cooperate. While the order to open was going around to the batteries, President Davis and General Lee, with their staff and followers, were with me in a little open field near the rear of my right. We were in pleasant conversation, anticipating fruitful results from the fight, when our batteries opened. Instantly the Federal batteries responded most spitefully. It was impossible for the enemy to see us as we sat on our horses in the little field, surrounded by tall, heavy timber and thick undergrowth; yet a battery by chance had our range and exact distance, and poure
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., With the cavalry on the Peninsula. (search)
d their attack with audacity. Cavalrymen galloped around field-works. We soon heard of the gallantry of Colonel Grier, Major Lawrence Williams, Captains Sanders, Davis, Baker, and others in cavalry charges, and that the French Princes were among the first in the advance. Lieutenant-Colonel Grier, commanding the 1st ( Old Billy G the army was in line about seven miles from Richmond, on the 25th of May, I was directed to communicate with the gun-boats on the James River at City Point. Lieutenant Davis, of the 3d Pennsylvania, with ten men, was selected for the duty, and he made his way along various roads infested with the pickets and patrols of the enemy r points were called in, and at 6:30 A. M., on the 28th, the regiment crossed White Oak Swamp, leading Keyes's corps, and advanced to the Charles City road. Lieutenant Davis was again sent to communicate with the gun-boats on the James. At daylight, on the 29th, Captain White's squadron, with 200 infantry and 2 guns, was sent
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., Richmond scenes in 1862. (search)
eceive the new-comers. The only public event of note was the inauguration of Mr. Davis as President of the Permanent Government of the Confederate States, which we And it was thought ominous afterward, when the story was repeated, that, as Mrs. Davis, who had a Virginia negro for coachman, was driven to the inauguration, she o should be; and this is the way we do in Richmond at funerals and sich-like. Mrs. Davis promptly ordered the outwalkers away, and with them departed all the pomp andthe moan of hospitals, the stifled note of sorrow! During all this time President Davis was a familiar and picturesque figure on the streets, walking through the mes amusing. For instance, when General Lee had crossed the Chickahominy, President Davis, with several staff-officers, overtook the column, and, with the Secretary is no place for it--in an accent of command. Such a rebuff was a stunner to Mr. Davis, who, however, soon regained his serenity and answered: Well, General, if
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., Washington under Banks. (search)
r a few days the discoveries of scattered detachments were numerous and surprising; some only turned up after a check had been put on the commissary issues, and about ten days later, in the The defenses of Washington during the Antietam campaign, September 1--20, 1862. Extensive additions to the defenses of the west bank of the Potomac were made subsequently; these will be indicated hereafter on another map. Forts Alexander, Franklin, and Ripley were afterward united and calledredoubts Davis, Kirby, and Cross, receiving later the name of Fort Sumner. Forts De Kalb, Massachusetts, Pennsylvania, and Blenker were afterward changed respectively to Strong, Stevens, Reno, and Reynolds.--Editors. most insalubrious part of the slashes (now the fashionable quarter of the capital) I came upon a squadron of cavalry comfortably waiting orders--from anybody. The stragglers were promptly gathered in, the hotels and bar-rooms were swept of officers of all grades absent without leave, while
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., The opposing forces in the Maryland campaign. (search)
ds (k), Lieut.-Col. James K. Kerr; 6th Pa., Lieut.-Col. C. Ross Smith. Brigade loss: Antietam, k, 3; w, 10 == 13. Fourth Brigade, Col. Andrew T. McReynolds: 1st N. Y., Maj. Alonzo W. Adams; 12th Pa., Maj. James A. Congdon. Fifth Brigade, Col. Benjamin F. Davis: 8th N. Y., Col. Benjamin F. Davis; 3d Pa., Lieut.-Col. Samuel W. Owen. Unattached, 15th Pa. (detachment), Col. William J. Palmer. Loss: Antietam, k, 1. The total loss of the Union Army in the three principal engagements of the campaiCol. Benjamin F. Davis; 3d Pa., Lieut.-Col. Samuel W. Owen. Unattached, 15th Pa. (detachment), Col. William J. Palmer. Loss: Antietam, k, 1. The total loss of the Union Army in the three principal engagements of the campaign was as follows:  Killed.Wounded.Captured or missing.Total. South Mountain3251403851813 Crampton's Pass1134182533 Antietam2108954975312,410 The casualties during the entire campaign, from September 3d to 20th (exclusive of Miles's force at Harper's Ferry, for which see page 618), aggregated 2629 killed, 11,583 wounded, and 991 captured or missing == 15,203. The Confederate Army. General Robert E. Lee. Longstreet's command, Maj.-Gen. James Longstreet. Staff loss (in the campai
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