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William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2 4 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2. You can also browse the collection for Charles G. Davis or search for Charles G. Davis in all documents.

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William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 4: Bristol County. (search)
t of the town. The selectmen were authorized to borrow money to pay the bounties. Another meeting was held on the 19th of August, at which it was voted to increase the bounty fifty dollars; and, at an adjourned meeting held on the 28th of November, it was voted to pay a bounty of two hundred dollars to each volunteer who shall enlist for nine months service, and be credited to the quota of the town. The selectmen were authorized to borrow money to pay the same. Godfrey C. Macomber, Charles G. Davis, Joseph R. Davis, and Adoniram Gilmore were added to the recruiting committee. On the 29th of December the selectmen were authorized to borrow whatever sums of money may be necessary for the payment of State aid to the families of volunteers belonging to Acushnet. 1863. No action appears to have been necessary for the town, in its official capacity, to fill its quota and pay bounties and State aid during this year. 1864. A meeting was held on the 4th of April, at which it was vot
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 13: Plymouth County. (search)
rty days, and be mustered in and credited to the quota of the town. They were also authorized to borrow not exceeding six thousand dollars to pay the same. Voted, that the property of soldiers shall not be taxed to pay any portion of the money raised for this purpose. The representatives of Plymouth in the Legislature were instructed to procure, if possible, the passage of a law reimbursing the town for the expenditure of money in the payment of bounties to volunteers. On motion of Charles G. Davis, Esq., it was— Voted, That the citizens of Plymouth, in town-meeting assembled, hereby pledge themselves to purchase and encourage, so far as possible, the products of American industry, and earnestly recommend to their fellow-citizens and the women of New England,—ever zealous in every patriotic mode of sustaining the cause of their country,—the expediency and the duty of breaking the bonds of habit and fashion, and of wearing and consuming the products of American labor; that this<