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Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 3 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 2 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 18. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 27. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War.. You can also browse the collection for J. A. Davis or search for J. A. Davis in all documents.

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Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 44: battle of Mobile Bay. (search)
James Sheppard. Steamer Arizona. Acting-Master, H. Tibbetts; Acting-Assistant Surgeon, S. H. Weil; Acting-Assistant Paymaster, W. L. Darling; Acting-Ensigns, S. J. Butler and Wm. Harcourt; Acting-Master's Mates, J. H. Mallon and T. P. Jones; Engineers: Acting-First-Assistant, C. H. Harrington; Acting-Second-Assistant, J. W. Smyth; Third-Assistants, J. E. Fallon and L. Golden. Steamer Antona. Acting-Master, A. L. B. Zerega; Acting-Assistant Paymaster, H. M. Whittemore; Acting-Ensigns, J. A. Davis, J. F. Perkins, A. L. C. Bowie and H. L. Ransom; Acting-Master's Mate, J. P. Cole; Engineers: Acting-First-Assistant, W. D. Adair; Acting-Third-Assistants, R. H. Alexander, Barna Cook and F. A. Hurd. Steamer Granite City. Acting-Masters, C. W. Lamson and A. H. Atkinson; Acting-Assistant Surgeon, E. C. Ver Mulen; Acting-Assistant Paymaster, John Reed; Acting Ensigns, S. R. Tyrrell and A. H. Berry; Acting Master's Mates, T. R. Marshall, T. E. Ashmead and D. Hall; Engineers: Ac
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 45: the cruise of the Sumter and the havoc she committed. (search)
itutional lawyer, and the secession fallacy has been so thoroughly exposed that we have no fears of another civil war based on State Rights theories. Commander Semmes resigned his commission in the United States Navy on the 15th of February, 1861, and made the best of his way to the capitol of the Southern Confederacy, temporarily fixed at Montgomery, Alabama. On his arrival he put himself in communication with Mr. Conrad, Chairman of the Confederate States Naval Committee, and when President Davis reached the city, a few days afterwards, offered his services to the Confederate Government. They were at once accepted, and Semmes proceeded to Washington. after a visit to Richmond and Harper's Ferry, to ascertain the character of certain machinery at the latter place, in anticipation of the enlargement of the Tredagar Works at Richmond, for the South meant war from the beginning, in case of any attempt on the part of the Northern States to prevent them from carrying out their desig