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Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 12 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 12 2 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Poetry and Incidents., Volume 7. (ed. Frank Moore) 6 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore) 6 2 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: March 5, 1863., [Electronic resource] 6 0 Browse Search
John Beatty, The Citizen-Soldier; or, Memoirs of a Volunteer 4 0 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 4 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 4 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 6. (ed. Frank Moore) 3 1 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 3: The Decisive Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 2 2 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: March 5, 1863., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Jeff C. Davis or search for Jeff C. Davis in all documents.

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rces at Shelbyville, but upon Tullahoma by way of Manchester and McMinnville. The troops stationed at Nashville will probably make a faint upon Shelbyville, but no absolute assault is expected from that side of the enemy's line. The entire strength of the army in Murfreesboro' is estimated at fifty thousand. Our reliable reports from the Northern portion of the State represent the reinforcements to consist of three divisions, each not less than ten thousand strong. The division of Jeff C. Davis, with Johnson's cavalry, stationed in Williamson county, are put down at twelve thousand. The forces at Nashville do not exceed ten thousand. Thus the entire body of troops, composing the Department of Rosecrans reach nearly the figures of one hundred thousand. Of these at least a fourth are unable for duty.--Setting apart twenty thousand more for garrison duty, and the available army to be brought against us will not come for wrong of sixty thousand, less than were engaged and in rea
ored children in the District of Columbia, Mr. Carille spoke in opposition to educating any one who had a dark complexion. He was roundly roasted by Grimes and Morrill, men who believe in letting even the Devil read the Bible. On an indirect motion to kill the bill, nine white men, calling themselves freemen, and being United States Senators, voted to shut every ray of intelligence from a handful of poor free negro children — most of them, probably, the offspring of white fathers. Senator Davis, of Ky., made a furious on Gen. Butler, accusing him of all manner of enormities while in New Orleans. He held up McClellan as the opposite of Butler, and no one questioned the fact. Wilson defended him — the motive for attacking Butler was his seal in crushing the rebellion. In the House, the bill authorizing the President to suspend the writ of habeas corpus, when and where he may deem proper, was discussed. The pro-slavery men began to filibuster. General Hooker is getti
s off Galveston, &c. A copy of Bolleau's apology. The following is a copy of the apology made by Albert D. Bolleau, editor of the Philadelphia Journal, to Gen. Schenck, and which procured his release: Headq'rs Middle Department, 8TH Army Corps, Baltimore, Md., Feb. 1, 1863. I. Albert D. Bolleau, citizen of Philadelphia, editor and publisher of the Philadelphia Evening Journal, now confined in Fort McHenry for the publication of an editorial article, under the title of "Davis's Message," in that newspaper, January 20, 1863, and for the publication of other articles of like dangerous character, tending to the support and encouragement of the rebellion against the Government of the United States, do hereby freely and voluntarily express my regret for the publication of that article, or for any other article of like tendency or character, and distinctly disavow such article or articles being published with my proper authority or knowledge, and declare that such publ