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Varina Davis, Jefferson Davis: Ex-President of the Confederate States of America, A Memoir by his Wife, Volume 2 1,039 11 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 833 7 Browse Search
Varina Davis, Jefferson Davis: Ex-President of the Confederate States of America, A Memoir by his Wife, Volume 1 656 14 Browse Search
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure) 580 0 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 459 3 Browse Search
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 435 13 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 355 1 Browse Search
Edward Alfred Pollard, The lost cause; a new Southern history of the War of the Confederates ... Drawn from official sources and approved by the most distinguished Confederate leaders. 352 2 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 333 7 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 330 2 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Jefferson Davis or search for Jefferson Davis in all documents.

Your search returned 7 results in 5 document sections:

thorough reconnoissance was made of Atlanta, and a new line of works begun, which required a smaller garrison to hold. During this month, the enemy, whom we had left at Lovejoy's Station, moved westward toward the Chattahoochee, taking position facing us and covering the West-Point Railroad, about Palmetto Station. He also threw a pontoon-bridge across the Chattahoochee, and sent cavalry detachments to the west, in the direction of Carrolton and Powder Springs. About the same time President Davis visited Macon and his army at Palmetto, and made harangues referring to an active campaign against us. Hood still remained in command of the confederate forces, with Cheatham, S. D. Lee, and Stewart commanding his three corps, and Wheeler in command of his cavalry, which had been largely reinforced. My cavalry consisted of two divisions; one was stationed at Decatur, under command of Brigadier-General Garrard; the other, commanded by Brigadier-General Kilpatrick, was posted near Sand
ed to be corduroyed. I had sent the Pontiac to cover these troops and their crossing, at Sister's Ferry, forty-one miles from the city, where this vessel arrived on the twenty-fourth of January, about three days in advance of the column of General Davis. By the seventh of February, the last man of the rear division was over, without molestation; and the Pontiac dropped down the river, anchoring near the city, by reason of a request from the General, to the effect that he considered the pres M. Fleetwood, late of rebel gunboat Macon, and branch pilot of Savannah; John Ganaan, and J. B. Metzger, Thirty-first Georgia; all of whom have been turned over to the Provost-Marshal. On the evening of the twenty-seventh, the scouts of General Davis's column reached here, and soon after, the rest of the Fourteenth corps. They had been delayed by the very bad roads, and the great amount of corduroying to be done. The movements of this wing are greatly impeded by the great freshets, but
d be bows on to Fort Moultrie, and presenting a large fixed mark without protection ahead, would certainly be disabled. Lieutenant-General Scott approved my plan, and, on the seventh of February, introduced me to Mr. Holt, the Secretary of War, to whom I explained the project, and offered my services to conduct the party to the Fort. Mr. Holt agreed to present the matter to President Buchanan that evening. The next day, the eighth of February, news was received of the election of Jefferson Davis by the Montgomery Convention. I called upon General Scott, and he intimated to me that probably no effort would be made to relieve Fort Sumter. He seemed much disappointed and astonished; I therefore returned to New-York on the ninth of February. On the twelfth of March, I received a telegram from Postmaster-General Blair, to come to Washington, and I arrived there on the thirteenth. Mr. Blair having been acquainted with the proposition I presented to General Scott under Mr. Buchan
ight in Hampton roads, Va. Official reports. see Doc. Page 267, Vol. IV. rebellion record. Executive Department, April 10, 1862. To the Senate and House of Representatives of the Confederate States: I herewith transmit to Congress a communication from the Secretary of the Navy, covering a detailed report of Flag-Officer Buchanan, of the brilliant triumph of his squadron over the vastly superior forces of the enemy, in Hampton Roads, on the eighth and ninth of March last. Jefferson Davis. Letter of the Secretary of the Navy. Confederate States of America, Navy Department, Richmond, April 7, 1862. To the President: sir: I have the honor to submit herewith copy of the detailed report of Flag-Officer Buchanan of the brilliant triumph of his squadron over the vastly superior forces of the enemy, in Hampton Roads, on the eighth and ninth of March last, a brief report, by Lieutenant Jones, of the battle of the eighth, having been previously made. The conduct of
Doc. 22.-operations of General Lee's army. Official Confederate reports. Message of Jefferson Davis. Richmond, Va., December 23, 1868. To the Senate and House of Representatives: I herewith transmit for your information a communication from the Secretary of War, covering General Lee's report of the operations of the army of Northern Virginia, from the date of his assumption of command to and including the battle of Fredericksburgh, December thirteenth, 1862, and the surbordinate reports appertaining thereto. Jefferson Davis. Communication from Secretary of War. Confederate States of America, War Department, Richmond, Va., Dec. 21, 1863. To His Excellency the President: sir: I have the honor herewith to transmit, for the information of Congress, General Lee's report of operations! of the army of Northern Virginia, from the date of his assumption of command to and including the battle of Fredericksburgh, December thirteenth, 1863, and the subordinate reports