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Varina Davis, Jefferson Davis: Ex-President of the Confederate States of America, A Memoir by his Wife, Volume 2 1,039 11 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 833 7 Browse Search
Varina Davis, Jefferson Davis: Ex-President of the Confederate States of America, A Memoir by his Wife, Volume 1 656 14 Browse Search
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure) 580 0 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 459 3 Browse Search
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 435 13 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 355 1 Browse Search
Edward Alfred Pollard, The lost cause; a new Southern history of the War of the Confederates ... Drawn from official sources and approved by the most distinguished Confederate leaders. 352 2 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 333 7 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 330 2 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Jefferson Davis or search for Jefferson Davis in all documents.

Your search returned 38 results in 14 document sections:

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The battle of Chickamauga-letter from Captain W. N. Polk. (search)
s the State road some four hundred yards. Negley and Davis now threatening his rear, made retreat expedient. An his left and rear, and the divisions of Negley and Davis in front, which compelled him to withdraw his troops Wood's division4,125 Barnes's brigade about1,800 Davis's division2,971 Negley's division4,349 One brigade next on the right was McCook, with the divisions of Davis and Sheridan. Wilder's mounted infantry formed the n, was in front of Hood's corps. The divisions of Davis and Sheridan, and Wilder's brigade of mounted infanting Negley's place in the line betweed Reynold's and Davis's division. The entire Federal line was covered by Wood's division, Van Cleve, a portion of Brannan's, Davis's and Sheridan's, and Wilder's brigade of mounted in of Brannan's were driven in confusion to the right, Davis was thrust in like disorder to the left; Hindman attptured entire. Sheridan's division, two brigades of Davis's division, and Rosecrans disappeared from the field
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Confederate treasure-statement of Paymaster John F. Wheless. (search)
saw the published report of an interview which represented General J. E. Johnston as making injurious reflections on President Davis in connection with the Confederate States treasure removed from Richmond, General Wheless, like other true-hearted Ce out of reach of orders, and Captain Parker had to act on his own judgment, and I have every reason to believe that President Davis had no knowledge of our return to Abbeville until he arrived there. The morning following the departure of the treaed the influence of these gentlemen with Judge Reagan, but made no suggestion that they should present the matter to President Davis, and though he was in the parlor that night and the next morning I did not trouble him with any reference to it. Knohe exception of a few hours, and from personal knowledge can say that any statement which charges or insinuates that Jefferson Davis used any part of it for his personal benefit is without the slightest foundation, and considering the ease with whic
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The story of the attempted formation of a N. W. Confederacy. (search)
the Valley, and, after that was disposed of, to make the advance on Washington, was adopted at a conference between President Davis and General Lee, late in the afternoon of the 12th of June, 1864, and I began the movement early on the morning of tb Thompson, most of which was deposited at a bank in Toronto, is not excelled in its romanticism by that other story of Mr. Davis's carrying off over $2,000,000 in specie about his person when he was made a prisoner at the close of the war. If th colleagues in Canada, the following statement is to be found in The rise and fall of the Confederate Government, by President Davis, vol. 2, pp. 611-12: The opening of the spring campaign of 1864 was a favorable conjuncture for the employmenvor an interview, but finally refused, on the ground that the Commissioners were not authorized to treat for peace. Mr. Davis makes no further mention of this mission in his book, and he says not one word, anywhere, of the alleged scheme for rel
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Campaigns of the civil war — ChancellorsvilleGettysburg. (search)
's strength, because no return of his army has been found later than May 31. At that date his Present for duty was 64,159 infantry and artillery, and 10,292 cavalry--total 74,451. Between that date and July 1, Corse's brigade of five regiments, and three regiments of Early's division, that had been included in this return, were detached, and left behind in Virginia, while Pettigrew's brigade of four regiments, two regiments that had been in West Virginia, and perhaps two other regiments in Davis' newly formed brigade, had been added to Lee's infantry. These infantry additions may be taken as off-setting the infantry detached, and therefore not affecting the question. Besides these changes there were added to Lee's army the two cavalry brigades of Jenkins and Imboden. Both the Count of Paris and Colonel Taylor, of General Lee's staff, estimate the strength of three cavalry brigades at 3,000 men. The Count and some other writers, have imagined, without a single fact on which to
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The PeninsulaMcClellan's campaign of 1862, by Alexander S. Webb. (search)
ed, definite plan of operations guided the Confederates on June 1st. Severe but desultory fighting took place between Longstreet's lines and the fresh troops of Hooker's and Richardson's divisions without any decided result, while Smith, now in chief command of the Confederates remained quiet in front of Sumner, though Magruder's large division, which had been unengaged, was at hand. By midday all fighting had ceased. Early in the afternoon General R. E. Lee, was placed in command by President Davis, and during the evening and night he ordered the Confederate army back to its late positions in front of Richmond. The battle of Seven Pines, though costing each army about 6,000 men, resulted in little. The plan of the Confederate leader was admirable, but the execution of it was defective. Too much time was wasted in waiting for Huger; but a more serious fault was the delay in sending forward Smith's division on Longstreet's left. Next morning the battle might have been renewed
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 4.37 (search)
nies, select captains and choose officers. That was impossible. So they were left behind or scattered through the whole army, and the consequence has been the most widespread distrust of Maryland among the Southern people and army. Before then there had been the warmest enthusiasm and most intense sympathy for our State. The persons who destroyed our regiment may thank themselves for having inflicted a more deadly blow on the interests and future chances of the State than Hicks, Winter Davis and Bradford combined. On the 17th August, 1862, the regiment was mustered out and paid off. It had many more men than some regiments. The non-commissioned officers received the colors, regimental fund and other property, which was turned over to them by the Colonel. They appointed a committee of sergeants with the color-sergeant at the head to present the regimental color and bucktail, which they had followed in every fight, to Mrs. Johnson, in token of their appreciation of her effort
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), A grand meeting in New Orleans on the 25th of April in behalf of the Southern Historical Society. (search)
uck the house was fall and ready to greet the distinguished speakers. Hon. Jefferson Davis, leaning on the arm of Governor Francis T. Nicholls, followed by Rev. Dright. After an eloquent peroration he introduced to the audience the Hon. Jefferson Davis. When the venerable soldier and statesman arose to respond to the intmmon impulse, the whole assembly stood up in exulting reverence and respect. Mr. Davis, as soon as the applause permitted, delivered, first in a low voice, which grually warmed up to inspiriting tones, the following address: Address of President Davis. Ladies and Gentlemen,--It would be more than superfluous to address to me in the few remaining days I may yet live among you. [Great applause.] Mr. Davis was frequently applauded throughout the delivery of his address, and was cheeth as faithfully now as when he followed the standard of Lee and Jackson--ex-President Davis, the able statesman, pure patriot and finished orator, who has always giv
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Roster of troops at battle of Chickamauga. (search)
ot engaged, two brigades, Preston's3,270 Federal force September 19th, General Rosecranz Commanding. Left wing--Major-General Thomas. Brannan's division5,989 Baird's division4,655 Johnson's division4,184 Palmer's division4,853 Reynolds's division6,268 Van Cleve, two brigades2,300   Total, infantry28,247   Artillery, about2,000   Total, about30,247   Loss7,701 Right wing--General Orittenden and McCook. Wood's division4,125 Barnes's brigade, about1,800 Davis's division2,971 Negley's division4,349 One brigade, Sheridan's division1,373   Total, infantry14,618   Artillery, about1,000 Wilder's brigade Being unable to ascertain General Wilder's force, the total of this wing cannot be given.--mounted infantry Confederate forces Sept. 20th--General Bragg Commanding. Right wing--Lieutenant-General Polk. Hill's corps.Breckinridge3,769 Cleburne4,670 Walker's corps.Liddell,4,355 Gist, Cheatham's division6,000    Total18,814
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Addresses of Rev. J. K. Gutheim and Rev. Dr. Palmer, at the great meeting in New Orleans. (search)
Addresses of Rev. J. K. Gutheim and Rev. Dr. Palmer, at the great meeting in New Orleans. We are sure that our readers will be glad to have the other addresses delivered at the great meeting at New Orleans, on the 25th of April in behalf of our Society. We have not been able to secure a copy of that of General George D. Johnston, of which the papers spoke in high terms, but have great pleasure in presenting those of Rabbi Gutheim, and Dr. Palmer, in addition to the superb address of President Davis which we printed in our last number. Address of Rabbi J. K. Gutheim Ladies and Gentleman,--The history of the world is the tribunal of judgment of the world. This pithy sentence of the great German poet may in its spirit be applied to the special history of every single nation. Whatever the deeds and experiences of peoples and States--whatever the destinies and events occurring in the bosom of the human family, history transmits them in its records to posterity to render an impa
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Notes and Queries. did General L. A. Armistead fight on the Federal side at First Manassas? (search)
ad moved with his family, in order to be free from the annoyances of the war. Did the Confederate Authorities ever Refuse any Proposition to Mitigate the Sufferings of Prisoners? The Michigan Post and Tribune makes the recent speech of President Davis in New Orleans the occasion of a vile attack upon him, and among other slanders prints the following, which we only reproduce in order to brand it as false in every particular, and to ask our readers to turn again to the abundant proofs we hnly would be the means of giving life and health to the starving thousands, but could and should be devoted to that purpose, and yet, not an ear of succulent corn, nor a healthful vegetable of any sort, passed into those gates of death. The Hon. Jefferson Davis himself was enthroned in Richmond during his brief disgraceful reign, and he must have forgotten that in November, 1863, the United States Government sent Captain Irving up the James with the steamer Convoy laden with clothing and provis
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