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Varina Davis, Jefferson Davis: Ex-President of the Confederate States of America, A Memoir by his Wife, Volume 2 1,039 11 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 833 7 Browse Search
Varina Davis, Jefferson Davis: Ex-President of the Confederate States of America, A Memoir by his Wife, Volume 1 656 14 Browse Search
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure) 580 0 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 459 3 Browse Search
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 435 13 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 355 1 Browse Search
Edward Alfred Pollard, The lost cause; a new Southern history of the War of the Confederates ... Drawn from official sources and approved by the most distinguished Confederate leaders. 352 2 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 333 7 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 330 2 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Jefferson Davis or search for Jefferson Davis in all documents.

Your search returned 118 results in 23 document sections:

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ther side. This morning Morgan's brigade of Davis' division were on picket, when a squad of rebebase of Tunnel Hill Ridge, where it joined General Davis' skirmishers, under Colonel Dan McCook, whform, on the centre, and entered Tunnel Hill. Davis' division moved along the main wagon road runnund and exploded within three feet of Brigadier-General Davis and Captain Barnett. The General hadd when it ceased Stanley was far in advance of Davis' position of the morning, and extended his lineneral Wood's division. With the exception of Davis' division, the Fourteenth corps was not engageel John G. Mitchell, commanding brigade in General Davis' division, is to have the honor. His lin the slope of Rocky Face, just on the left of Davis, and at once engage the rebel skirmishers. TeDalton, just here passes between the two hills Davis carried, touching the one on the right. Betwerew. Colonel John G. Mitchell's brigade, of Davis' division, was now sent to the assistance of T[12 more...]
ound to our right, preparatory to a flank movement upon the enemy's left, for the purpose of turning it. General Sherman arrived at the front to-day, and in company with other general officers, rode along the lines, minutely inspecting the country, and familiarizing himself with the position of his command. This morning at an early hour, a small force advanced upon the enemy, who, in small force, held Bald Knob, a small hill about a mile south of Catoosa Platform, and drove them from it without the loss of a man on either side. This morning Morgan's brigade of Davis' division were on picket, when a squad of rebels, mounted, came up within three hundred yards of our pickets, and called out, Will you exchange coffee for tobacco? Yes, was the reply, Fort Pillow, d----n you, as the pickets leveled their guns and discharged a volley into them, wounding one man. The rebels not liking leaden coffee retreated, exclaiming as they ran, Are you niggers or white men, to treat us that way?
y skirmish line, the right of which rested at the base of Tunnel Hill Ridge, where it joined General Davis' skirmishers, under Colonel Dan McCook, whose brigade was on the extreme left of the line of about a mile north-west of the town. While the Fourth corps were thus engaged, Johnson's and Davis' divisions moved up from Catoosa Platform, on the centre, and entered Tunnel Hill. Davis' divisDavis' division moved along the main wagon road running parallel with the railroad, and threw his line across the valley. Johnson came up on the right and entered the town by a narrow trail running down from the direction of Nickojack's Gap. Barnett's Illinois battery, attached to Davis' division, opened their guns upon the enemy's position about nine, and a brisk cannonading was kept up for two hours unt, who responded vigorously, a shell struck the ground and exploded within three feet of Brigadier-General Davis and Captain Barnett. The General had a narrow escape from death, but he remained in hi
Monday, May 9. At six o'clock Davis' division opened the ball on the right by throwing forward his whole line towards the base of Rocky Face Creek into the gaps where the engagement took place in February last. Much difficulty was experienced in crossing the creek, which the rebels had inundated since our last visit to Buzzard pen his artillery, and expose the position of his batteries. From five until after dark a heavy fire was kept up, and when it ceased Stanley was far in advance of Davis' position of the morning, and extended his line some distance up the slope of Rocky Face, supported by General Wood's division. With the exception of Davis' divisDavis' division, the Fourteenth corps was not engaged. General Schofield, with his corps, succeeded about one o'clock in getting up and confronting the enemy's fortifications on the left of Dalton. Brisk firing was heard in the direction of his position, and I learn to-night that he holds, like the centre and right wings of the army, every
pass through the rebel lines, and visited Jefferson Davis at Richmond. This visit, in many respectore, and besought me to come here, and offer Mr. Davis peace on such conditions. That may be. Sed respectfully solicit an interview with President Davis. They visit Richmond only as private c that a free interchange of views between President Davis and themselves may open the way to such o Caesar — and I replied: We thank you, Mr. Davis. It is not often you meet men of our clothe But we think Union essential to peace; and, Mr. Davis, could two people, with the same language, sightful carnage? We are both Christian men, Mr. Davis. Can you, as a Christian man, leave untried fearful, fearful account. Not all of it, Mr. Davis. I admit a fearful account, but it is not aut forever against twenty millions. Again Mr. Davis smiled. Do you suppose there are twenty pression. I hope the day may never come, Mr. Davis, when I say that, said the Colonel. A hal[16 more...]
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore), Doc. 19. the siege of Suffolk, Virginia. (search)
nce his death by Captain Felt. Colonel Murphy commanded brigade; Colonel Drake, Fort Union; Colonel Hawkins, Fort Nansemond; Captain Sullivan, Fort Halleck; Colonel Davis, the Draw-bridge Battery; Colonel Worth, Battery Mansfield; Colonel Thorpe, the Redan, and Rosecrans; Captain Johnson, Battery Mowdey; Colonel England, Batteryants Seabury, Young, Thayer, Strong and Murray, of the signal corps, have been indefatigable, day and night, and of the greatest service in their departments. Captain Davis shares the above commendation for the few days he was here. The conduct of Lieutenant-Colonel Nixon, Ninety-ninth New. York; of Captain Morris, Lieutenants r the city, on the thirteenth or fourteenth of May. General Lee's testimony. Lee, in his report of Chancellorsville transmitted to the rebel Congress by Jefferson Davis, December thirty-first, 1863, says of Longstreet, that he was detached for service south of the James River in February, and did not rejoin the army until aft
General Lee's testimony. Lee, in his report of Chancellorsville transmitted to the rebel Congress by Jefferson Davis, December thirty-first, 1863, says of Longstreet, that he was detached for service south of the James River in February, and did not rejoin the army until after the battle of Chancellorsville.
Doc. 24. speech of Jefferson Davis: at Macon, Ga., September 23, 1864. Ladies and Gentlemen, Friends, and Fellowcitizens: It would have gladdened my heart to have met you in prosperity instead of adversity. But friends are drawn together in adversity. The son of a Georgian, who fought through the first Revolution, I would be untrue to myself if I should forget the State in her day of peril. What though misfortune has befallen our arms from Decatur to Jonesboro, our cause is not lost. Sherman cannot keep up his long line of communication, and retreat, sooner or later he must; and when that day comes the fate that befell the army of the French Empire in its retreat from Moscow will be reacted. Our cavalry and our people will harass and destroy his army as did the Cossacks that of Napoleon; and the Yankee General, like him, will escape with only a body-guard. How can this be the most speedily effected? By the absentees of Hood's army returning to their posts; and will t
you to grant the request here asked, I would beg that this be referred to President Davis for his action. Requesting as early an answer to this communication as issioners authorized to negotiate for peace, and desired to communicate to President Davis the views of Mr. Lincoln, and to obtain the President's views in return, s R. Gilmore, of Massachusetts, most respectfully solicit an interview with President Davis. They visit Richmond as private citizens, and have no official character the South, and have little doubt that a free interchange of views between President Davis and themselves would open the way to such official negotiations as would ual Grant in that letter had asked that this request should be preferred to President Davis. Mr. Gilmore then showed me a card, written and signed by Mr. Lincoln, reqr. Lincoln with authority for stating his own views and receiving those of President Davis? Both answered in the affirmative, and I then said that the President wou
f war, but is to be turned over to his supposed owner or claimant, and put at such labor or service as that owner or claimant may choose, and the officers in command of such soldiers, in the language of a supposed act of the Confederate States, are to be turned over to the Governors of States, upon requisitions, for the purpose of being punished by the laws of such States, for acts done in war in the armies of the United States. You must be aware that there is still a proclamation by Jefferson Davis, claiming to be Chief Executive of the Confederate States, declaring in substance that all officers of colored troops mustered into the service of the United States were not to be treated as prisoners of war, but were to be turned over for punishment to the Governors of States. I am reciting these public acts from memory, and will be pardoned for not giving the exact words, although I believe I do not vary the substance and effect. These declarations on the part of those whom you
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