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Varina Davis, Jefferson Davis: Ex-President of the Confederate States of America, A Memoir by his Wife, Volume 2 1,039 11 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 833 7 Browse Search
Varina Davis, Jefferson Davis: Ex-President of the Confederate States of America, A Memoir by his Wife, Volume 1 656 14 Browse Search
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure) 580 0 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 459 3 Browse Search
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 435 13 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 355 1 Browse Search
Edward Alfred Pollard, The lost cause; a new Southern history of the War of the Confederates ... Drawn from official sources and approved by the most distinguished Confederate leaders. 352 2 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 333 7 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 330 2 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in J. William Jones, Christ in the camp, or religion in Lee's army. You can also browse the collection for Jefferson Davis or search for Jefferson Davis in all documents.

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J. William Jones, Christ in the camp, or religion in Lee's army, Chapter 1: religious elements in the army. (search)
a devout soldier, for I have seen the men for whom I have preached, with whom I have prayed, and whom I have seen presiding at Baptist associations, fully panoplied for the war. The self-denial of volunteers to serve in this war is unmistakably manifest in the advent among us of Southern soldiers. The gallant South Carolinians came first. Close on their rear came the Georgians; and we hear that Alabama, Mississippi and Louisiana are on the way. To cap the climax, we hope soon to see Jefferson Davis on the hills of Richmond. But my main object in penning these lines was to speak briefly of the Georgians. At least three of the companies already arrived are commanded by Christians. Captain Doyall and Captain Beall are Baptists; Captain Smith is a Methodist; Captain Hardeman, though not, I believe a professor himself, is closely connected with a religious family. All of these gentlemen occupy high social positions in their several communities, and their companies comprise the best
J. William Jones, Christ in the camp, or religion in Lee's army, Chapter 2: influence of Christian officers. (search)
up for Jesus. Our Christian President, Jefferson Davis, was always outspoken on the side of evanhis great deliverance: Now, therefore, I, Jefferson Davis, President of the Confederate States, do of the blessings of peace and security. Jefferson Davis. March 5, 1863. It is meet that, e trust for the future. To this end I, Jefferson Davis, President of the Confederate States of A thousand eight hundred and sixty-three. Jefferson Davis. Again do I call the people of the rough all the dangers that environed us. Jefferson Davis. The Senate and House of Representaall to the honor and glory of His name. Jefferson Davis. Not simply in his official station, bt in his private life and influence as well, Mr. Davis was pronounced in his Christian character, ae observance of the fast-day appointed by President Davis in the spring of 1863, he makes the folloe observance of the fast-day appointed by President Davis in August, 1863, was as follows: Gener[7 more...]
J. William Jones, Christ in the camp, or religion in Lee's army, Chapter 4: influence of Christian officers—concluded. (search)
friends and to himself that he must soon pass away. He calmly made disposition of his effects, and gave necessary directions. Hearing the sound of artillery, he said to his gallant and trusted adjutant, Major H. B. McClellan, who was with him, and whose valuable services in the field he so highly appreciated: Major, Fitz. Lee may need you, and expressed interest in how the battle was going. But he quickly added, with a sigh: But I must be preparing for another world. About noon President Davis visited his bedside, and tenderly taking the hand of his great cavalry-man, asked him how he felt. Easy, but willing to die, if God and my country think I have fulfilled my destiny and done my duty. To the surgeon later in the afternoon he replied, when told that he could not live long: I am resigned if it be God's will. I would like to see my wife. But God's will be done. His noble wife had been sent for, and was hastening to him, but she did not arrive until after his death.
J. William Jones, Christ in the camp, or religion in Lee's army, Chapter 5: Bible and colportage work. (search)
blockade, or manufacturing them with our poor facilities. The first Confederate Bible printed, so far as I can ascertain, was from the presses of the South-western Publishing House, at Nashville, 1861. A copy of this edition was sent to President Davis, who replied: The Bible is a beautiful specimen of Southern workmanship, and if I live to be inaugurated the first President of the Confederacy, on the 22d of February, my lips shall press the sacred volume which your kindness has bestowed uth the most desperate, lawless men ever known in the South. In view of all these considerations, the speaker argued that this work has the most weighty claims upon all classes of the community. Mr. Tucker closed with an eloquent tribute to President Davis. In all his reading he had never known of a state paper closing, as the President's inaugural address, with an earnest prayer to the God of heaven, for His blessing upon himself and his country. Colonel Wright, member of Congress from Ge
J. William Jones, Christ in the camp, or religion in Lee's army, Chapter 7: work of the chaplains and missionaries. (search)
ptist brethren, asking me to come and baptize men who had professed conversion in their meetings and wanted to unite with the Baptists. And I did not hesitate to reciprocate the courtesy, when men of my command wanted to unite with other denominations on a profession of repentance towards God and faith towards the Lord Jesus Christ. I remember that my good Brother Witherspoon told me, one day, that he had a good joke on Brother Jones, which was to the following effect: I had gone over to Davis's Mississippi Brigade, at Brother Witherspoon's invitation, and had cut the ice on a mill-pond, at Madison Run Station, Orange county, Virginia, and baptized a number of men. In the service I had read, without note or comment, some of the passages of Scripture bearing on the ordinance. The next day, one of the men, who had been active in the revival meetings, went to Chaplain Witherspoon and said: I do not think that you ought to invite Brother Jones to come over here any more. Why not?
J. William Jones, Christ in the camp, or religion in Lee's army, Chapter 8: eagerness of the soldiers to hear the Gospel. (search)
rship, and looking out he saw that a large congregation had assembled. He, of course, went at once to the place and preached to deeply interested men, who stood in snow several inches deep, and among the number he counted fourteen barefooted men, besides scores whose shoes afforded very little protection from the snow. Many times have I seen barefooted men attending prayer-meeting or preaching in the snow or during the coldest weather of winter. I went one day to meet an appointment in Davis's Mississippi Brigade, which had lost their winter-quarters and comfortable chapel, south of Orange Court House, by being ordered on picket-duty near the Rapidan. A steady rain was falling, and I went with no idea of being able to preach, but hoping to meet a few of the inquirers under their rude shelters, that I might point them to the Lamb of God that taketh away the sin of the world. To my surprise, as I rode up, I heard a volume of sacred song ascending from the usual place of worship,
J. William Jones, Christ in the camp, or religion in Lee's army, Chapter 11: the great revival along the Rapidan. (search)
d November, 1863, revivals were reported in Smith's Virginia, Gordon's Georgia, Mahone's Virginia, Hays's Louisiana, Wright's Georgia, Wilcox's Alabama, Posey's Mississippi, Ramseur's North Carolina, Doles's Georgia, Scales's North Carolina, Thomas's Georgia, J. M. Jones's Virginia, Battle's Alabama, Kemper's Virginia, Armistead's Virginia, Corse's Virginia, Garnett's Virginia, Hoke's North Carolina, Benning's Georgia, Kershaw's South Carolina, Lane's North Carolina, Daniel's North Carolina, Davis's Mississippi, Kirkland's North Carolina, Semmes's Georgia, Barksdale's Mississippi, Jenkins's South Carolina, Law's Alabama, Anderson's Georgia, Steuart's Virginia, Stonewall (Virginia), Iverson's North Carolina, Cooke's North Carolina, H. H. Walker's Virginia and Tennessee, McGowan's South Carolina, and a number of the artillery battalions and cavalry regiments. This revival work went graciously on, and though the Bristoe campaign, Longstreet's move to the battle of Chickamauga and his
J. William Jones, Christ in the camp, or religion in Lee's army, Chapter 12: progress of the work in 1864-65. (search)
oughout the army. A revival was reported as in progress in Davis's Mississippi Brigade, in which nine had professed conversi20. Preached to a large and very attentive congregation in Davis's Mississippi Brigade, and after preaching received five fo among these noble men?] Monday, February 22. I went to Davis's Brigade this morning to hear a lecture from the Rev. B. Tnd good man. After the lecture I received three others from Davis's Brigade and one from Wright's, and we repaired to a mill-ors of religion in the Fifty-fifth North Carolina Regiment, Davis's Brigade, 3 are Lutherans, 4 Presbyterians, 8 unconnected ation, A. N. Va., Orange Court House. March 23. . . . In Davis's Brigade, of Heth's Division, seventy-one have professed c the Christian Index: On Friday last, I preached for Davis's Mississippi Brigade, now on picket at Peyton's Ford, and the army. Extensive revivals were reported in Kirkland's, Davis's, Cooke's, Harris's, Wright's, Perrin's, Scales's, Lane's,
J. William Jones, Christ in the camp, or religion in Lee's army, Chapter 13: results of the work and proofs of its genuineness (search)
giment prayermeetings, company prayer-meetings and mess prayer-meetings, and prayer-meetings to prepare for prayer-meetings, until one of our missionaries (Rev. J. E. Chambliss) reported to our Chaplains' Association that he could find no time in Davis's Mississippi Brigade to preach without conflicting with some prayermeeting. I have incidentally illustrated the earnestness with which these young converts went to work to lead their comrades to Christ, and have space here for only one more iall that his friends could hope, or Christianity demand; all that his country could be proud of in chivalry, or his enemies dread in the example of martyrdom. I have spoken of General J. E. B. Stuart, the flower of cavaliers, who said to President Davis, who stood at his dying bedside: If it were God's will, I should like to live longer and serve my country. If I must die, I should like to see my wife first; but if it is His will that I die now, I am ready and willing to go if God and my c
J. William Jones, Christ in the camp, or religion in Lee's army, Appendix: letters from our army workers. (search)
ppear as they did then, while our excellent Brother Witherspoon, of Davis's Brigade, presented the truth to them. Their bones for many a lonnce of the day of fasting, humiliation and prayer appointed by President Davis was then discussed. Plans of diffusing our labors were sugges given in the body of the book two additional proclamations of President Davis. Proclamation by the President of the Confederate States oferance. In furtherance of these objects, now, therefore, I, Jefferson Davis, President of the Confederate States of America, do issue thise year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and sixty-four. Jefferson Davis. [L. S.] By the President: J. P. Benjamin, Secretary os from which death was a welcome escape. Now, therefore, I, Jefferson Davis, President of the Confederate States of America, do issue thishe year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and sixtyfour. Jefferson Davis. [L. S.] By the President: J. P. Benjamin, Secretary.
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