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Varina Davis, Jefferson Davis: Ex-President of the Confederate States of America, A Memoir by his Wife, Volume 2 1,039 11 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 833 7 Browse Search
Varina Davis, Jefferson Davis: Ex-President of the Confederate States of America, A Memoir by his Wife, Volume 1 656 14 Browse Search
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure) 580 0 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 459 3 Browse Search
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 435 13 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 355 1 Browse Search
Edward Alfred Pollard, The lost cause; a new Southern history of the War of the Confederates ... Drawn from official sources and approved by the most distinguished Confederate leaders. 352 2 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 333 7 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 330 2 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Jefferson Davis or search for Jefferson Davis in all documents.

Your search returned 61 results in 22 document sections:

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Cursory sketch of the campaigns of General Bragg. (search)
e most if not all of whom were his admirers, and to the ability of his little army, to give battle to the overwhelming odds under Sherman, for the one last lingering hope of holding Atlanta, the key to the Confederacy. And, though failing in the end, gallantly did he redeem his responsible pledge. The venture was hazardous in the extreme, and it required brave officers to meet the emergency. 'Twas then that the brave and chivalric Stephen D. Lee, who merited the high compliments of President Davis, paid him before the Legislature of Mississippi the year previous, was called to the command of Hood's corps, and our equally gallant and intrepid Jacob H. Sharp and others, tried and true men, were promoted to the rank of general officers, in which capacity their military skill was more urgently needed and their valuable services could at the same time be rewarded The battles of the 22d and 28th of July, 1864, around Atlanta, and at Jonesboroa on the 31st August following, attested the
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 3 (search)
a, Colonel Julian Harrison. Fifteenth Virginia, Colonel C. R. Collins. Butler's division. Major-General M. C. Butler. Dunovants brigade. Brigadier-General John Dunovant. Third South Carolina, [Colonel C. J. Colcock.] Fourth South Carolina, [Colonel B. H. Rutledge.] Fifth [Sixth] South Carolina, Colonel [H. K.] Aiken. Young's brigade. Brigadier-General P. M. B. Young. Cobb's Georgia Legion, Colonel G J. Wright, Phillips' Legion, Lieutenant-Colonel W. W. Rich. Jeff. Davis Legion, Lieutenant-Colonel J. F. Waring. Miller's Legion,—— —— Love's Legion,—— ——. Seventh Georgia, Major [E. C.] Anderson. Rosser's brigade. Brigadier-General Thomas L. Rosser. Seventh Virginia, Colonel R. H. Dulany. Eleventh Virginia, Colonel O. R. Funsten. Twelfth Virginia, Colonel A. W. Harman. Thirty-fifth Virginia Battalion, Lieut.-Colonel E. V. White. Lee's division. Major-General W. H. F. Lee. Barringer's brigade. Brigadier-General Rufus Ba
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Agreement between the United States Government and South Carolina as to preserving the status of the Forts at Charleston. (search)
t issuing an order requiring Anderson to return to Fort Moultrie. During the two or three days when that matter was under consideration and discussion several of the Southern Senators waited upon the President and urged him to issue the order; and without perhaps making any positive pledge that he would do so, his conversation and promises left the impression upon the minds of many of them that the order would be issued. Messrs. Hunter, of Virginia, Toombs, of Georgia, Mallory and Yulee, Davis, Slidell and Benjamin are among those who conferred with the President, and most of them after such conference were left with the impression that Anderson would be ordered back by the President. Mansion House, Greenville, S. C., September 19, 1881 The above is an accurate copy of the original statement as I took it down when given to me by Governor Orr. I sent a copy to General T. W. Crawford, and have his letter acknowledging its receipt. Ellison Capers. Christ Church Rectory, Green
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Arsenals, workshops, foundries, etc. (search)
y of sulphur was found in New Orleans, where large quantities were in store to be used in sugar-refining. The entire stock was secured, amounting to some four or five hundred tons. The erection of a large powder-mill was early pressed by President Davis, and about the middle of June, 1861, he directed me to detail an officer to select a site and begin the work. The day after this order was given Colonel G W. Rains, a graduate of West Point, in every way qualified for this service, arrived his fitness for his place, and of a financial ability which supplemented the narrowness of Mr. Memminger's purse. Before this, and immediately upon the formation of the Confederate Government, Admiral Semmes had been sent to the North by President Davis as purchasing agent of arms and other ordnance stores, and succeeded in making contracts for, and purchases of, powder, percussion caps, cap machinery (never delivered), revolvers, &c. He also procured drawings for a bullet-pressing machine,
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Bureau of foreign supplies. (search)
Bureau of foreign supplies. It soon became obvious that in the Ordnance Department we must rely greatly on the introduction of articles of prime necessity through the blockade ports. As before stated, President Davis early saw this, and had an officer detailed to go abroad as the agent of the department. To systematize the introduction of the purchases, it was soon found advisable to own and run our own steamers. Major Huse made the suggestion also from that side of the water. Accordingly, he purchased and sent in the Robert E. Lee at a cost of 300, 000, a vessel capable of stowing six hundred and fifty bales of cotton. This vessel was kept running between Bermuda and Wilmington, and made some fifteen to eighteen successive trips before she was finally captured—the first twelve with the regularity of a packet. She was commanded first by Captain Wilkinson, of the navy. Soon the Cornubia, named the Lady Davis, was added, and ran as successfully as the R. E. Lee. She had the
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Development of the arsenals, armories and other places of manufacture of Ordnance stores. (search)
rks, found that the fusion of a small per cent. of iron with the copper and tin improved the strength of the bronze castings very much. The powder mills at Augusta, Ga., which I have already mentioned as the direct result of the order of President Davis, were wonderfully successful and never met with serious accident—a safe indication of the goodness of its arrangements. It showed, too, that under able direction the resources of Southern workshops and the skill of its artisans had already ke the erection at Selma of a large foundry for the casting of cannon of the heaviest calibre. A large contract was made with him and advances of money made from time to time as the work progressed. After a time Mr. McRae was called on by President Davis to go abroad in connection with Confederate finances. He made it a condition that he should be relieved of his works and contract at Selma without pecuniary loss to himself. The works were thereupon assumed by the War and Navy Departments
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Contributions to the history of the Confederate Ordnance Department. (search)
some four or five hundred tons. The erection of a large powder-mill was early pressed by President Davis, and about the middle of June, 1861, he directed me to detail an officer to select a site an the formation of the Confederate Government, Admiral Semmes had been sent to the North by President Davis as purchasing agent of arms and other ordnance stores, and succeeded in making contracts fo introduction of articles of prime necessity through the blockade ports. As before stated, President Davis early saw this, and had an officer detailed to go abroad as the agent of the department. T mills at Augusta, Ga., which I have already mentioned as the direct result of the order of President Davis, were wonderfully successful and never met with serious accident—a safe indication of the gney made from time to time as the work progressed. After a time Mr. McRae was called on by President Davis to go abroad in connection with Confederate finances. He made it a condition that he shoul
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The story of the Arkansas. (search)
The story of the Arkansas. By George W. Gift No. 2. We left the Carondelet sinking and pursued the Tyler and Queen of the West. Both were swifter vessels than the Arkansas, and in our efforts to overtake them we worked off steam too rapidly and the result was that when we entered the Mississippi river they had gained sufficiently on us to notify the fleets of Farragut and Davis of our approach, and that before we had come in sight around the point. The result was instant and rapid preparation by the squadrons for our reception. Steam was hurried up on all the river vessels, and they weighed or slipped, and took up such positions as would enable them to hit us and at the same time keep away from our powerful beak, if possible. On coming in sight of them the scene was one of intense interest. A dozen or more war vessels were steaming about in an uneasy, uncertain way, somewhat after the manner of a brood of chickens on the approach of a hawk. Tugs, transports and hospital
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Sabine Pass. (search)
bine Pass against the entire Federal fleet during the war, and received the personal thanks of Mr. Davis, &c. The statement further goes on to say that the Federal force consisted of three Federal brf the gun-boats referred to it could not approach nearer than two and a half to three miles of Mr. Davis's forty bravest men, who were as safe from harm in the earth-work as they would have been a tho navigate a channel in which there could not have been much more, if any, than seven feet. Mr. Davis was undoubtedly misled, and did not know that if the garrison had abandoned their post at any spectfully yours, Frederic speed, Formerly A. A. General 1st Division 19th Army Corps. President Davis's account. [In order that our readers may have the other side, and that there may go intr record a full and authentic narrative of this heroic action, we copy the account given by President Davis in Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government.] The strategic importance to the enemy o
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The story of the Arkansas. (search)
uggle. The sea-going fleet of Farragut was to pass down, drag out and literally mob us; whilst the iron-clad squadron of Davis was to keep the batteries engaged. Down they came, steaming slowly and steadily, and seemed to be on the lookout for us.r from the paymaster of the Richmond to his wife, described the attack of the Arkansas, and was unsparing on Farragut and Davis, accusing them of incapacity and negligence, remarking that Porter was the only man present who had brains as well as couon a few clothes I hastened on deck to ascertain the state of things. Around us lay the combined power of Farragut's and Davis's fleets. Frigates, gunboats, iron-plated boats, wooden rams and iron-cased rams were anchored along the banks for a mild is now under the batteries at Vicksburg. * * We were the head ship except the hospital boat and river steamers. One of Davis's rams came around our stern to give her a butt as she passed (she was called the Lancaster), but unfortunately a shot fr
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