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Varina Davis, Jefferson Davis: Ex-President of the Confederate States of America, A Memoir by his Wife, Volume 2 1,039 11 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 833 7 Browse Search
Varina Davis, Jefferson Davis: Ex-President of the Confederate States of America, A Memoir by his Wife, Volume 1 656 14 Browse Search
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure) 580 0 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 459 3 Browse Search
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 435 13 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 355 1 Browse Search
Edward Alfred Pollard, The lost cause; a new Southern history of the War of the Confederates ... Drawn from official sources and approved by the most distinguished Confederate leaders. 352 2 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 333 7 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 330 2 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 20. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Jefferson Davis or search for Jefferson Davis in all documents.

Your search returned 73 results in 10 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 20. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.1 (search)
s made public, Constructor Porter, in an open letter, contested his award and claimed solely for himself the honor of the plan and the building of the Merrimac. If he desired to have and to keep this honor, it seems to me that he should have vindicated his claim and contested the issue of the patent to Lieutenant John M. Brooke at the time when the most material witnesses to the fact were alive. In neglecting to do this, he has materially contributed to putting his claim out of court. Mr. Davis, in his Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government, Lieutenant Catesby Ap. R. Jones, and Lieutenant John Taylor Wood (the two last officers of the Merrimac), all award the plan to Lieutenant John M. Brooke. In view of the testimony and the patent granted to Lieutenant Brooke by the Confederate Government it would be impossible to make a different award; and the death of Secretary Mallory and Mr. Williamson, the most important witnesses in the matter, makes the possibility of a reversion
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 20. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.9 (search)
ellion Record, Volume XXXVI, part I, page 1054), says: About 10 o'clock Major-General M. L. Smith and the others sent out to examine the enemy's position reported that the left of the enemy's line extended but a short distance beyond the plank-road. Special directions were given to Lieutenant Colonel Sorrel to conduct the brigades of Generals Mahone, G. T. Anderson, and Wofford beyond the enemy's left, and to attack him on his left and rear (I have since heard that the brigade of General Davis formed a part of this flanking force), the flank movement to be followed by a general advance, Anderson's brigade on the right and Wofford's on the left, Mahone being in the centre. They moved by the flank until the unfinished railroad from Gordonsville to Fredericksburg was reached. Forming on this railroad, facing to the north, they advanced in the direction of the plank-road till they encountered the enemy in flank and rear, who was then engaging the brigades of Gregg, Benning, and
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 20. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.11 (search)
last legs, at Lee's wish and suggestion, that Davis again called Johnston to command the forlorn hy Operations. Mrs. Davis' singular book, Jefferson Davis, ex-President of the Confederate States, Confederate executive; a large proportion of Mr. Davis' to a statement of his side of the controvers so understood, as it appears that on July 20 Davis notified Johnston, in answer to an inquiry madded as they are unbecoming. I am, &c., Jefferson Davis. It may be noted that up to this dateition. After the war, in his Rise and Fall, Davis gives his views of this question at the time. the army in condition to advance effectively. Davis says he returned to Richmond and began to reinut public opinion warranted and even compelled Davis to assign Johnston to the chief western commanton's disastrous Vicksburg campaign followed. Davis, to shift responsibility, was not slow in ascrnds. Confederate commanders in the West. Davis was unfortunate in his western commanders. Pe[40 more...]
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 20. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.13 (search)
fleet, straight for the fort; Admiral Dahlgren's flag ship, the Monitor Montauk, Commander Fairfax, in the lead. It was followed by the new Ironsides, Captain Rowan; the Monitors, Catskill, Commander Rogers; Patapsco, Lieutenant-Commander Badger; Nantucket, Commander Beaumont and Weekawken, Commander Calhoun. There were, besides five gunboats, the Paul Jones, Commander Rhind; Ottowa, Commander Whiting; the Seneca, Commander Gibson; the Chippewa, Commander Harris, and the Wissahickon, Commander Davis. Swiftly and noiselessly approached, the white spray breaking from their sharp prows, their long dark hull lines scarcely showing above the water, and the coal black drum-like turrets glistening in the morning's sun. Approaching still nearer they formed the arc of a circle around Wagner, the nearest being about three hundred yards distant from it. With deliberate precision they halted and waited the word of command to sweep the embrasures of the fort where our intrepid cannoneers stood
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 20. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.15 (search)
s of Congress on the subject, much less to allow a military subordinate to guide him in this work by an unauthorized arrangement made under the supervision of Jefferson Davis and his cabinet. Mr. Lincoln left no room for doubt on this point, for he gave the following direction to General Grant a fortnight before the Sherman-JohnstJohnston he asked him if he could control other armies than his own. Johnston replied that he could not do this, but indicated that he could procure authority from Davis. On the following page, he says: General Johnston, saying that he thought during the night he could procure authority to act in the name of all the Confederate ar E. Johnston for a temporary cessation of active hostilities, to lay before our government at Washington the agreement made between us, with the full sanction of Mr. Davis and in the presence of Mr. Breckinridge. His messenger reached Washington on the 21st of April, and delivered his despatches to General Grant. You represente
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 20. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.17 (search)
our hearts were in jail. It was not that he was our president—our valiant chieftain; it was not that he had shed lustre on the American arms at Buena Vista; it was not that in the Senate chamber he had been the equal of the most august senator that ever sat in that great body; it was not that as Secretary of War he was the best official the American nation ever had; it was not that he had championed our cause and lost; but it was that he was selected as our victim that made us surround Jefferson Davis with all our hearts. So long as for our sins he was selected as our victim to suffer in our place, we bear to him the utmost loyalty, that all the world may know that no man who had been our comrade would we ever desert when he was in the hour of trial. And we also built upon the second great principle—the same old idea of the autonomy of the States—and out of these two principles we worked our salvation. Of course there were all the private hardships which war and disaster bring. <
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 20. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.18 (search)
se in the summer of 1862, and feeling a parental solicitude about the safety of his sons and their chances of success, asked Mr. Lincoln how many men he thought Jeff. Davis had in the field. Lincoln responded that Jeff. Davis had 3,000,000 men in the field. This startled the old man. After regaining his composure he asked Mr. LinJeff. Davis had 3,000,000 men in the field. This startled the old man. After regaining his composure he asked Mr. Lincoln how he knew this fact. Mr. Lincoln replied by saying, I have 1,000,000 of men in the field, and whenever one of my generals gets whipped down in Virginia he always says that the Rebels had three men to his one. Yes, sir, I have 1,000,000 in the field and Jeff. Davis has 3,000,000. We have said that no correct history of tJeff. Davis has 3,000,000. We have said that no correct history of the civil war has yet been written. Most of the histories now before the public were written before all the official facts from both sides had been published. The histories of the civil war up to this time have been written with pens dipped in the battle-blood of the fierce conflict, and at the high tide of personal and national p
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 20. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The private Infantryman. (search)
ths and heeds no danger in its pursuit. It is that spirit which warmed the hearts and steeled the nerves to bear the burdens of both the Old and the New South. My ideal hero embraced it with superb unselfishness. Some would say he should be Robert E. Lee, whose great heart and lofty leadership enchained the everlasting affection of the South. Some would say he should be Stonewall Jackson, whose magic power so often awakened the wonder of the world. Some would say he should be Jefferson Davis, whose polished manhood held with unyielding nerve the pearl of Southern pride. Some would say he was among the hosts of cavalrymen and artillerymen, who flashed their swords and pulled their lanyards in battles often won. Yes! These are the jewels of the South, and there are honors and memories for them; but I would take away the stars and trimmings and titles, for there was charm and inspiration in them. I would eliminate, too, the higher grades of service. The purest spiri
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 20. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Unveiling of the statue of General Ambrose Powell Hill at Richmond, Virginia, May 30, 1892. (search)
istian President, soldier, statesman, orator, patriot—Jefferson Davis—all these will teach our children's children that thesis bier and mourned with genuine heart-felt sorrow for Jefferson Davis. Dead, but his spirit breathes; Dead, but his heart i touching scene than the South weeping at the grave of Jefferson Davis—a scene which touched even the bitterest foes of the sld understand the reverence of the Southern people for Jefferson Davis. He honored them for their constancy to that heroic mihilated. No man was ever converted by being overpowered. Davis had remained to the end, the immovable type, exponent, and y Johnston, and A. P. Hill. May the good work go on, until Davis, and Joe. Johnston, Jeb Stuart and Ewell, and many others h swinging gait of Jackson's foot cavalry, cheering for Jefferson Davis and for the Southern Confederacy. Though their first sent to the army made it advisable, in the opinion of President Davis and General Lee, to divide the Army of Northern Virgin<
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 20. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Index. (search)
icers, 398. Cullen, Surgeon J. S. D., 95. Cutshaw, Col. W. E., 238, 261. Dame, D. D., Rev. W. M., 261. Davis, President, Jefferson, Ingalls' tribute to, 371. Davis and Johnston, Cause of their variance, 95. Did the Federals Fight AgainDavis and Johnston, Cause of their variance, 95. Did the Federals Fight Against Superior Numbers? 238. Doby, Capt. A. E., Death of, 89. Dunn, Major, Andrew, 95. Early, Tribute of, to Gen. Ewell, 32. Echols, Gen., John, 26. Edwards, Leroy S., 74. Ellett, Capt, Thos., 185, 238, 361, 399. Ellyson, Hon., J. Taylor, 1 Hill, Gen. D. H., 65. Hollins, Commander, Geo. N., 21. Hutton, Midshipman, 10. Ingalls, Hon. J. J., His tribute to Davis, 371. Ireson, M. M. S., 49. Jackson's Opinion of Ewell, Gen. Stonewall, 26; Reminiscences of, 307; Tribute to, 373. Jackson, Wounding of Col. J. H., 182. James, Capt., Geo. S., 62. Jenkins, Death of Gen. M., 70. Johnston and Davis, Cause of their variance, 95. Johnston, Gen., Albert Sidney, Death of, 129. Johnston's Surrender, Terms offered by Gen