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Varina Davis, Jefferson Davis: Ex-President of the Confederate States of America, A Memoir by his Wife, Volume 2 1,039 11 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 833 7 Browse Search
Varina Davis, Jefferson Davis: Ex-President of the Confederate States of America, A Memoir by his Wife, Volume 1 656 14 Browse Search
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure) 580 0 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 459 3 Browse Search
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 435 13 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 355 1 Browse Search
Edward Alfred Pollard, The lost cause; a new Southern history of the War of the Confederates ... Drawn from official sources and approved by the most distinguished Confederate leaders. 352 2 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 333 7 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 330 2 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 37. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Jefferson Davis or search for Jefferson Davis in all documents.

Your search returned 85 results in 13 document sections:

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 37. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Work of the Ordnance Bureau of the war Department of the Confederate States, 1861-5. (search)
Work of the Ordnance Bureau of the war Department of the Confederate States, 1861-5. By J. W. Mallet, ex-Lieut. Col. of Artillery and Superintendent of Confederate States Ordnance Laboratories. President Jefferson Davis bluntly stated the truth when he wrote that it soon became evident to all that the South had gone to war without counting the cost. Our chief difficulty was the want of arms and munitions of war. In the interval between the election and the inauguration of President Linco in special charge at Richmond of this branch of the service, agencies were established at Bermuda, Nassau and Havana to manage it, and gradually the purchase was made of a number of steamers specially suited to blockade running, the R. E. Lee, Lady Davis, Eugenia, Stag, etc., which brought, chiefly to Wilmington and Charleston, stores for which there was the most urgent need, and took out cargoes of cotton in payment, which were almost as eagerly desired in Europe. Most of the mercury used in
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 37. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Review of the Gettysburg campaign. (search)
mes to cooperate in the capture of Suffolk. Mr. Davis says that in anticipation of General Hooker' the Peninsula, which caused him to write to Mr. Davis, on the 15th, I hesitate to draw the whole ofrom that purpose. On the 25th, he wrote to Mr. Davis, from Williamsport, I have not sufficient trformed in line on that side of the road, while Davis moving to the left, formed on the opposite sid Hill where the view was lost in the forests. Davis' right rested on the turnpike and overlapped, me to form in line before meeting the shock of Davis, who had ordered a charge. A fierce fight fol Some of the other regiments fared no better. Davis reported that out of nine field officers prese his force on Gettysburg, and that accordingly Davis and Archer were directed to advance, the objecy. When Archer's brigade was shattered, and Davis driven back, the Federal infantry occupied subas moved up on Pettigrew's left and reinforced Davis. These movements occupied some time, during w[8 more...]
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 37. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Story of battle of five Forks. (search)
ponent part of Grant's army, and scarcely lived in name. In The Army of Northern Virginia all answered to its last roll call that had not already made final answer at the summons of the Master. Each of these two great armies had found in the other, a foreman worthy of its steel, and each, in a manner, lies buried in a common grave, overwhelmed by a tidal wave. With the surrender of The Army of Northern Virginia ended the life of The Confederate States, whose birth-throes shook a continent. The Confederate States died a—borning, and upon its in Memoriam, With spirit pointing to heaven this inscription: No nation rose so white and fair, None fell so pure of crime, Will survive the effacements of time; and two figures will always stand out upon it in bold relief— Jefferson Davis and Robert E. Lee. Around them, the others will be grouped. Near to them, perhaps, nearest, will be: Jackson and Forrest. Robert M. Stribling. Markham, Fauquier county,
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 37. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General J. E. B. Stuart in the Gettysburg campaign. (search)
owing paragraph: There is a floating legend that General Lee assumed all the blame of his defeat. He did not: his reports put all the blame on Stuart. That General Lee said to his soldiers after the repulse of Pickett's charge that he was responsible for the failure is not a floating legend but a well attested fact. That he refrained from reproaching his three Lieutenants, Hill and Ewell and Longstreet, with their share in the defeat is another well known fact. That he wrote to Jefferson Davis that touching and pathetic letter asking that a younger and better man be placed in command of the army, because of his lack of success is yet another proof that he assumed the responsibility of the failure. And to say that in his report he put all the blame on Stuart is a grave inaccuracy. The first report states the simple fact, without any animadversion that the absence of the cavalry rendered it impossible to obtain accurate information. The second rehearsed the orders given Gen
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 37. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Jefferson Davis. (search)
friendly feeling which may yet exist against Mr. Davis, and, as there was no cause for personal aniecome professionally interested in behalf of Mr. Davis. I called to Mr. Greeley's attention thatther at Hilton Head, South Carolina, that if Mr. Davis were guiltless of this latter offence, an avt he had already volunteered his services to Mr. Davis. Mr. O'Conor's course during the war was decRepublican party whom I have mentioned, that Mr. Davis did not by thought or act participate in a cir representatives at Richmond, pressed upon Mr. Davis, as the Executive and as the Commander-in-ch strong and prevalent, that on July 2, 1863, Mr. Davis accepted the proffered service of Mr. Alexanissioner to Washington. The sole purpose of Mr. Davis in allowing that mission appears, from the s by Mr. Sumner, recommending the trial of Jefferson Davis and Clement C. Clay before a military trither of these two particular charges against Mr. Davis individually; and a short time after this Mr[29 more...]
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 37. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Color Episode of the one hundred and Forty-Ninth regiment, Pennsylvania Volunteers. (search)
urage and enthusiasm the rest of their line, north, northwest and west of our little brigade. To think of it! Daniel's brigade of four regiments and a battery; Davis' brigade of three regiments (the fourth was absent at the time); all veteran troops and renowned fighters—and how many more of Heth's regiments south of the pike It. In the final advance of the Confederate line, towards 3 P. M., there was one part of the enveloping semi-circle that did not move on with the rest. This was Davis' brigade, stationed down along the wheat field, west of our colors. This brigade had lost heavily in the forenoon and was instructed to follow in rear of the first line in the final onset. Just then there was no line of Confederates in front of Davis, and all he needed to do to carry out his orders, was to delay marching, until, by the contraction of the semi-circle, further east, the right of Daniels' brigade connected with the left of Brockenbrough's. This accounts for the fact that
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 37. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Affidavit of Supervisors of Co. C, 149th regiment. Pa. Vols. (search)
let-Pickett or Pettigrew-written by Captain W. R. Bond, of Daniel's Brigade, who, in speaking of Davis' men says as follows: To illustrate the individual gallantry of these troops I will relate anegiments had to be changed in order that we might move in front of their left brigade, which was Davis': The Federal line, or lines, for my impression is there were two or more of them, were also lyi to the last minute. Nevertheless he sent a messenger to ask for orders and a watch was kept on Davis' brigade, one of their number getting up at intervals and taking a hurried glance in that directly have been no guard left to protect the colors. Daniel's brigade having moved further east, Davis' men were the only troops from whom Brehm anticipated any danger; and his intention, no doubt, w that line get too close before leaving his post, orders or no orders. But as explained before, Davis did not move with the rest of the sweeping semicircle, and Price and his squad came up through t
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 37. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.27 (search)
e time we hope that Mr. Bebout will not feel badly under the circumstances when he is informed that he is not the first projector of a flying machine in Richmond. During the war between the States a machine was commenced which was to take President Davis and his cabinet, together with some ordnance officers, to the upper air of Washington. The officers were to be supplied with an abundance of large hand grenades, and when these argonauts of the air were at a point immediately over the toprelieved the inventor of all embarrassment. There was a rattling of pine bars of an inch in diameter, and splinters filled the air, and thus fled the hope of the Confederacy to appeal to Washington from high heaven. It is improbable that President Davis encouraged such diabolism as was intended to be carried out by the promoters of that enterprise. In return of the idea the people in Richmond often surveyed the heavens at night and sometimes thought they saw a Yankee balloon ready to dro
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 37. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Who was last soldier to leave burning city. (search)
at fall we were both promoted to the staff as first lieutenants and aides-de-camp. In 1864 we were both in the Adjutant-General's Department with the rank of captain on the brigade staff. When our respective generals became major-generals in the early spring of 1865, we became entitled to the rank of lieutenant-colonel, but application was not made for our commissions as such, because we were both recommended to be made brigadier-generals. The order for such commissions was issued by President Davis, but did not reach us in the general turmoil and confusion of the last days of Richmond. When General Ewell was ordered by General Lee, on April 2, to evacuate the north branch of the James and march on to Amelia Courthouse, he selected me to command his extreme rear guard and placed me in command for that purpose. When Lieut.—Gen. Gordon was directed by General Lee to cover his retreat on the south side of the James, that officer selected Kyd Douglas, in command of his brigade, for t
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 37. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.33 (search)
es of the engagement at the bridge, advised me not to let Gen. Maury's article go unnoticed, and I replied, though then as now, I think we had enough to do to fight the enemy. Having been wounded and captured nearby the intrepid Armistead in the heroic charge where he led the remnant of Pickett's Division over the stone wall at Gettysburg; having been honored with this independant command after eight months confinement and subsequent escape from Johnson's Island, and congratulated by President Davis, for, as he facetiously said, arranging my own cartel, General Grant at the time refusing to exchange prisoners; having been fortunate to come out victor when attacked by so superior a force, and received the thanks and compliments of my superior officers and commanding general for the great service which they recognized had been accomplished only by handling to the best advantage undisciplined troops, though as brave and patriotic as seasoned veterans, I should have been and am content
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