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Varina Davis, Jefferson Davis: Ex-President of the Confederate States of America, A Memoir by his Wife, Volume 2 1,039 11 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 833 7 Browse Search
Varina Davis, Jefferson Davis: Ex-President of the Confederate States of America, A Memoir by his Wife, Volume 1 656 14 Browse Search
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure) 580 0 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 459 3 Browse Search
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 435 13 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 355 1 Browse Search
Edward Alfred Pollard, The lost cause; a new Southern history of the War of the Confederates ... Drawn from official sources and approved by the most distinguished Confederate leaders. 352 2 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 333 7 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 330 2 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.). You can also browse the collection for Jefferson Davis or search for Jefferson Davis in all documents.

Your search returned 65 results in 7 document sections:

Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.), Book I:—Richmond. (search)
dan. Disturbed by the same fears which had beset Mr. Lincoln, the cabinet of Mr. Davis dared no more than he to uncover their capital; so that on the arrival of McCton himself, who were in favor of waiting for the enemy in front of Richmond, Mr. Davis had sent the last-mentioned general into the Peninsula with all his army, wheined upon since the 30th of April, at a council of war held in Yorktown by Jefferson Davis, Lee, Johnston, and Magruder. The evacuation of Norfolk, which followed ain a book which has appeared since the close of the war, we may infer that President Davis is chiefly responsible, in the estimation of General Johnston, for the misirected in person all the movements which were to place his army in line. President Davis had come out of Richmond to witness the first act of this great conflict. mselves. General Lee was on the field of battle, and had brought with him President Davis; for it was hoped in Richmond that this day, the 30th, would complete the
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.), Book II:—the naval war. (search)
ons, than to the former political ally of Jefferson Davis, the lawyer in uniform, who made his appeh courage and ability. He was replaced by Captain Davis, who, while waiting for the issue of the said out; Farragut, by ascending the river, and Davis, by descending it, were to endeavor to join hatraband traffic. After the battle of Memphis, Davis, having assembled all the vessels he had left thousand men to spare as landing-parties with Davis' fleet. Although Farragut's resources were inas at last completed, and had left Yazoo City, Davis despatched three gunboats, the Tyler, the Queelled for the exercise of the utmost prudence. Davis and Farragut determined to abandon all offensibarricaded and defended by several works. Captain Davis, with six gun-boats and three transports laden with rations. While it was engaged with Davis' ships on the right side of the river, Rodgersnade was brought to an end without bloodshed. Davis, having ascertained that it would require a mu[6 more...]
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.), Book III:—Maryland. (search)
stablished his headquarters at Frederick. He issued a proclamation explaining to the people of Maryland his object in invading a State which he desired to treat as friendly, although not yet legally a part of the Confederacy, in the hope of obtaining through this appeal to their sympathies the assistance, both in men and materiel, of which he stood so greatly in need. In this manly and simple style of address, peculiar to himself, which was in strong contrast with the violent language of Mr. Davis, he presented himself as a liberator, but declared himself unwilling to coerce in any way the will of the sovereign State whose soil he trod. The people of Maryland took him literally at his word, and did not stir. The families of the emigrants alone manifested a noisy sympathy. If the majority were indifferent, the Union party was numerous and did not conceal its sentiments, while the few secessionists, not particularly delighted with the visit of the starving liberators, and anticipat
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.), Book IV:—Kentucky (search)
ississippi. All the troops placed under Grant numbered scarcely forty thousand men. The army of the Mississippi, composed of the divisions of Hamilton, Stanley, Davis and McKean, counted from twenty to twenty-two thousand men; the army of the Tennessee, reduced to the four small divisions of Sherman, McPherson, Ord and Hurlbut, ohnston, who had just been placed in command of the armies of the West, added his earnest solicitations to those of General Randolph, Secretary of War, to induce Mr. Davis to issue a formal order, directing Hindman to send twenty thousand men to the other side of the Mississippi to strengthen the army of Pemberton. This timely reinefit of the army of the Mississippi, as we shall presently see, it would probably have enabled him to come off victorious at the battle of Murfreesborough. But Mr. Davis refused to issue an order which would have caused a great deal of dissatisfaction in Arkansas. General Randolph, to the misfortune of the cause he had most zeal
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.), Book V:—Tennessee. (search)
rengthened since summer, forbade the hope that Davis' small flotilla would be able to force the pas should be sent to the relief of Pemberton. Mr. Davis thought otherwise. Holmes, at Little Rock, ve. That of Sheridan was on the left, that of Davis in the centre, and that of Johnson on the righby the other two divisions of McCook's corps. Davis' left and right, formed by Woodruff's and Posthe purpose of striking the Federal division of Davis in front and in flank at the same time, and thof Johnson's brigade, posted on their left. Davis had been allowed time to form his troops, and owever, without great losses, and the whole of Davis' division was driven back upon the skirts of t troops, extending on his right, in pursuit of Davis, who was in full retreat, threatened to surrou of the debris of the divisions of Johnson and Davis. These movements, however, could not be accrses; they allowed the soldiers of Johnson and Davis to pass through their ranks, who, being closel[10 more...]
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.), Book VI:—Virginia. (search)
of Congress. He was promoted to brigadier-general November 29, 1862. The author has confounded him with Brigadier-General E. J. Farnsworth, of Michigan, killed at Gettysburg.—Ed. gallantly charged on the left on the Warrenton road, but was stopped by a barricade which had been raised across it. On the Chester Gap road to the right the Federals steadily waited for their adversaries, whom they received with a well-sustained fire, which threw their ranks into confusion. At the same time, Colonel Davis, ordering the Eighth New York to draw their sabres, threw himself upon their flank, and after a hand-to-hand fight of a few minutes' duration drove them back in disorder. Stuart, unwilling to continue the fight, retired toward Flint Hill; Pleasanton followed him as far as Sandy Hook, thus occupying all the roads east of Chester Gap, whilst Averill took possession of Manassas Gap after a slight skirmish. On the 6th of November the army's change of base was therefore accomplished. Al
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.), Book VII:—politics. (search)
stitution was organized in February, 1862; Messrs. Davis and Stephens were invested for six years wgreat an evil; this was compulsory service. Mr. Davis vigorously called for it in the message he aates. Responding to the wishes expressed by Mr. Davis in his message of August 18th, Congress pass it was important to bring into the league. Mr. Davis' government was, therefore, compelled to resill at par. In his message of November 10th, Mr. Davis, while recommending the levying of new taxesns for the produce-loan, which, according to Mr. Davis, amounted during that year to nearly fifty se difficulties that, on the 18th of August, Mr. Davis addressed his message to Congress stating thf the In his message of January 12, 1863, Mr. Davis was at last compelled to recognize the gravir for the Confederate armies, was treated by Mr. Davis and the governor of the State as a rebelliouated with the rebellion. The refusal to put Mr. Davis himself upon trial at the close of the war—a[8 more...]