hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 24. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 8 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 5. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 4 0 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 24. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Joseph J. Davis or search for Joseph J. Davis in all documents.

Your search returned 4 results in 2 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 24. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.1 (search)
one of the most serious being the lack of the necessary books. This want was met by the preparation of Bingham's series of English and Latin text-books, which have been republished since the war and are now used in every State of the Union. Latin Grammar, Greensboro, 1863; Caesar's Commentaries, Greensboro, 1864. Perhaps the most curious of the educational enterprises of our alumni was the law school for Confederate prisoners, established on Johnson's Island in 1863 and 1864, by Joseph J. Davis (1847-50), who was then a prisoner of war. Xii. Governor Vance and the part of North Carolina in the war. But it is not until we come to the actual administration of affairs in North Carolina that we find the most exalted position that was filled by a son of this University, for it was Zebulon B. Vance who earned for himself the distinguishing epithet of the War Governor of the South. This proud title was well deserved and has been generally recognized throughout the Union. It
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 24. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.3 (search)
e. While rumors were afloat to the effect that Lee had only surrendered a small part of his forces, and that the bulk of his army had joined Johnston; that President Davis and his Cabinet had escaped across the Mississippi river and would reorganize the government at Shreveport, La., and other unfounded reports of like nature, wmate the situation, fought simply to afford statesmanship an opportunity to mitigate the sorrows of inevitable defeat. Again, in recounting an interview with President Davis in September, 1864, he says (page 206): I did not disguise my conviction that the best we could hope for was to protract the struggle until spring. PresidentPresident Davis not only disagreed with this, but believed the continuance of hostilities feasible up to the moment of his capture. He says in his work (page 696): If, as now seemed probable, (after the fall of Richmond,) there should be no prospect of successful defence, I intended then to cross the Mississippi river, where I believed Gen