hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Varina Davis, Jefferson Davis: Ex-President of the Confederate States of America, A Memoir by his Wife, Volume 2 59 3 Browse Search
Colonel Charles E. Hooker, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.2, Mississippi (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 29 5 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 19 1 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 11 3 Browse Search
A Roster of General Officers , Heads of Departments, Senators, Representatives , Military Organizations, &c., &c., in Confederate Service during the War between the States. (ed. Charles C. Jones, Jr. Late Lieut. Colonel of Artillery, C. S. A.) 10 2 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: may 30, 1861., [Electronic resource] 8 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: August 21, 1861., [Electronic resource] 5 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 17. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 4 0 Browse Search
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 4 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 4 0 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Joseph R. Davis or search for Joseph R. Davis in all documents.

Your search returned 2 results in 1 document section:

d to retreat in hot haste, leaving behind them every thing that impeded their escape. Guns, knapsacks, hats, caps, shoes, canteens, and blankets, covered the ground for miles and miles. At about 5 o'clock we heard cheer upon cheer, and the word Davis ran along the ranks, and we saw in the distance the tall, slender form of our gallant President, who had arrived upon the field in time to see the total rout of the army which threatened his capture, and the subjugation of the South. The President left Richmond at 6 o'clock in the morning, and reached Manassas Junction at 4, where, mounting a horse, accompanied by Col. Joseph R. Davis and numerous attendants, he galloped to the battle-field, just in time to join in the pursuit by a magnificent body of cavalry, consisting of 1,500 men, commanded by Lieut.-Col. Stewart. Soon after prayer in the Confederate Congress, on the morning of the 22d, the following despatch was read to that body: Manassas Junction, Sunday night. Nig