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Varina Davis, Jefferson Davis: Ex-President of the Confederate States of America, A Memoir by his Wife, Volume 2 2 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Poetry and Incidents., Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore) 2 0 Browse Search
Wendell Phillips, Theodore C. Pease, Speeches, Lectures and Letters of Wendell Phillips: Volume 1 2 0 Browse Search
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Varina Davis, Jefferson Davis: Ex-President of the Confederate States of America, A Memoir by his Wife, Volume 2, Chapter 85: the end of a noble life, and a nation's sorrow over its loss. (search)
mely moral nature. However handsome he may have been when excited in battle or debate-and at such times, I was told, he seemed an incarnation of the most poetic conceptions of a valiant knight-it surely was in his own home, with his family and friends around him, that he was seen at his best; and that best was the highest point of grace and refinement that the Southern character has reached. Lest any foreigner should read this article, let me say for his benefit that there are two Jefferson Davises in American history-one is a conspirator, a rebel, a traitor, and the Fiend of Andersonville --he is a myth evolved from the hell-smoke of cruel war-as purely imaginary a personage as Mephistopheles or the Hebrew Devil; the other was a statesman with clean hands and pure heart, who served his people faithfully from budding manhood to hoary age, without thought of self, with unbending integrity, and to the best of his great ability-he was a man of whom all his countrymen who knew him pe
Even the Quakers are aroused, as appears by the following: A Quaker merchant in New York said to one of his clerks: Well, friend----, is thee willing to enlist? I have thought of it, replied the clerk, but hesitated because I feared to lose my situation. If thee will enlist, replied the Quaker, not only shall thee have thy situation, but thy salary shall go on while thee is absent. But if thee will not serve thy country, thee cannot stay in this store. This is but a fair sample of the spirit now being displayed all over the free States. Can freedom be crushed out among such a people? Not all the Yanceys, Wigfalls and Jeff. Davises in creation could do it!--Evening Post.
Wendell Phillips, Theodore C. Pease, Speeches, Lectures and Letters of Wendell Phillips: Volume 1, chapter 13 (search)
at is vital. I value letters. I thank God that I was taught for many years; enough to see inside the sham. The upper tier of letters is mere amateur; does not understand its own business. William H. Prescott would have washed his hand twice, had Walker the filibuster grasped it unwittingly; but he sits down in his study and writes the history of filibusters, respectable only because they died three hundred years ago He did not know that he was the mere annalist of the Walkers and Jefferson Davises of that age. [Applause.] [In this connection, Mr. Phillips referred to Bunyan and to Shakespeare, by way of illustrating his point that the literature which is of use is the literature that is not honored as such when it is written.] So it is with government. Government arrogates to itself that it alone forms men. As well might the man down here in the court-house, who registers the birth of children, imagine that he was the father of all the children he registers. [Loud laught