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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Dawes, William, (search)
Dawes, William, Patriot. On April 18, 1775, he accompanied Paul Revere, riding through Roxbury, while Revere went by way of Charlestown. On the following day, when Adams and Hancock received the message from Warren, Revere, Dawes, and Samuel Prescott rode forward, arousing the inhabitants. They were surprised by a number of le Revere went by way of Charlestown. On the following day, when Adams and Hancock received the message from Warren, Revere, Dawes, and Samuel Prescott rode forward, arousing the inhabitants. They were surprised by a number of British at Lincoln, and both Dawes and Revere were captured, Prescott making good his escape to Concord.le Revere went by way of Charlestown. On the following day, when Adams and Hancock received the message from Warren, Revere, Dawes, and Samuel Prescott rode forward, arousing the inhabitants. They were surprised by a number of British at Lincoln, and both Dawes and Revere were captured, Prescott making good his escape to Concord.
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2, Chapter 7: the World's Convention.—1840. (search)
all be very glad to see you, and you will meet my friends William and Mary Howitt (unless some unexpected circumstance should prevent their coming), whom it may be a pleasure to you to meet. Lucretia Mott is, I think, also likely to come, with Mr. Dawes and Mr. Keep. William Dawes and the Rev. John Keep, of Oberlin. who were collecting aid for that institution. The dinner party came off on the date Appointed—a visit full of interest and delight to Mrs. Mott ( Life, p. 158). To her wrote WWilliam Dawes and the Rev. John Keep, of Oberlin. who were collecting aid for that institution. The dinner party came off on the date Appointed—a visit full of interest and delight to Mrs. Mott ( Life, p. 158). To her wrote William Howitt subsequently (Lib. 10.139): I have heard the noble Garrison blamed that he has not taken his place in the Convention, because you, his fellow-delegates, were excluded. I, on the contrary, honor him for his conduct. In mere worldly wisdom he might have entered the Convention, and there entered his protest against the decision—but in at once refusing to enter where you, his fellow-delegates, were shut out, he has entered a far nobler protest, not in the mere Convention, but in the<
Danforth, Joshua N., Rev., agent Am. Colon. Society, 1.285, debate with A. Buffum, 323; points out G. for kidnapping, 323, 324, falsely accuses him, 388. Davis, Edward Morris [b. Philadelphia, July 21, 1811], Letters to G., 2.21; from C. C. Burleigh, 2.124. Davis, Jefferson [b. 1808], 2.59. Davis, John [1787-1854], silent before Preston, 2.247: possible candidate for V. P., 314. Davis, Thomas, at annual meeting Am. A. S. S., 2.340, 348; calls Chardon St. Convention, 422. Dawes, William, 2.377. Dawson, W. C., 1.248. Denison, Charles W., Rev. [b. Stonington, Conn., Nov. 5, 1812; d. Washington, Nov. 13, 1881], edits World in Philadelphia, 1.415; delegate Nat. A. S. Convention, 398, committeeman, 406; denounced at South, 2.198; addresses colored people, 210; at N. Y. anniversary, 348, secedes, 349; opposes Borden's reflection, 437. Dickens, Charles [1812-1870], 2.383. Dickey, —, Rev. (of Penn.), 2.249, 250. Dickson, John [1808-1852], 1.482, 483. Dimmick, Lut
e answer. Percy hastened to Gage, who instantly directed that no one should be suffered to leave the town. But Warren had already, at ten o'clock, despatched William Dawes through Roxbury to Lexington, and at the same time desired Paul Revere to set off by way of Charlestown. Revere stopped only to engage a friend to raise the, between the hours of twelve and one, the message from Warren reached Adams and Hancock, who divined at once the object of the expedition. Revere, therefore, and Dawes, joined by Samuel Prescott, a high son of liberty from Concord, rode forward, calling up the inhabitants as they passed along, till in Lincoln they fell upon a party of British officers. Revere and Dawes were seized and taken back to Lexington, where they were released; but Prescott leaped over a low stone wall, and galloped on for Concord. There at about two in the morning, a peal from the belfry of the meeting-house brought hastily together the inhabitants of the place. They came fort
Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 3., The Royall House loan exhibition. (search)
a bullet-hole through it, which it is said to have received from an irate patriot who could not bear the sight of its device. Experts pronounced the china exhibit very valuable, yet it was mainly made up of bits of family treasures valued by their owners for love's sake. A cake basket of silver wire was brought to the Royall House in 1815 by Madam Ruth Tidd, and was used there as long as she lived. A silver porringer was owned by her father, William L. Dawes. He was a descendant of William Dawes, who rode through Roxbury to alarm the country, April, 1775. Among Revolutionary relics was the kettle in which Mrs. Abigail Brooks, wife of Rev. Edward Brooks, made chocolate for returning minute-men. Descendants of the Russell family loaned pewter plates which had been buried in Menotomy woods to save them from the British, April 19, 1775. Muskets which were once aimed at each other in deadly conflict hung side by side. A relic of colonial wars was the blanket on the high-posted be
n street at this point. Summer street was at first called Middlesex street, and was built practically on the tow path of the canal. There was a large artificial basin between there and Royall street where canal boats tied up to unload. On the south bank of the canal was the Columbian Hotel, which in its day had been a fine dwelling house. This hostelry, as well as the Medford House, was kept by James Bride and Augustus Baker. In the Royall House lived Mrs. Ruth Tidd, a sister of William Dawes, who on April 18, 1775, rode out by way of Roxbury to warn the Middlesex farmers of danger. She was about the only person in Medford who indulged in a coach and pair of horses. They were often seen on the road, and always on Sundays on the way to church. The carriage road to the stable was over a portion of the present Royall street; the stable stood facing Main street, near the corner of Royall and Florence streets. It seems strange to think of the Stearns mansion, which stands we
The route of Revere [Read at meeting of Medford Historical Society April 18, 1921] At the present time, with the observance of Patriots' day, it is well for Medford people to consider some of the natural features of one hundred and forty-six years ago. Perhaps others are so doing in the various towns through which the two riders passed, for William Dawes is now being remembered, though there was no poet to tell of his ride. Longfellow wrote that Revere rode over the bridge into Medford town, which is all very fine; but he really rode into Medford near the top of Winter hill. Do those that read the poem know how nearly Medford came to being left out of the ride that night? If it was twelve by the villagers' clocks when he rode over the river, he must have spent a little of the closing hour of the 18th in Medford, if we can credit the somewhat famous poem. It was a practically straight road through old Charlestown to old Menotomy, where, in changing his plan, he would ha
onse to the query, What do we celebrate in March? the Boston Massacre and the Siege and Evacuation of Boston were discussed, the members participating quite freely and with interest. The April meeting was similarly conducted, and falling on the eighteenth, very naturally the Battle of Lexington claimed attention, as well as the modern observance of Patriot's Day. Various poems and selections were read by Miss Atherton, Miss Durgin and Miss Carty, commemorating the historic rides of William Dawes and Paul Revere, and the hanging of the signal lanterns. Mr. Mann read a paper on The Route of Revere, which appears in the Register. President Ackerman called attention to the events of the winter of sixty years ago, culminating with the bombardment of Fort Sumter. The stirring scenes in Medford, next following, were recalled, including the departure of the Light Guard for Washington; the surrender at Appomattox, the restoration of the old flag to Sumter, and the terrible tragedy o
e Medford Minute-Men. Courtesy Medford Mercury. Mercury of that time with account of the patriotic decorations and displays; also certain rhymes of more or less interest relating to the historic day. But in 1917 there came an organized effort to make the occasion worth while and notable in Boston and the other cities and towns along the historic route. The first was certainly creditable to Medford, as indeed the later ones have been. In more recent years a second rider personating William Dawes has gone over that other route through Brookline and Cambridge which is 8 miles to Boston (see milestone at Harvard Square). The Old North or Christ Church still stands, and at the close of a service on the night of April 1 8, a messenger ascends to the steeple and hangs out two lights. Captain Isaac Hall's house in Medford also still stands, and Mr. Edward Gaffey, its owner and occupant, is glad to open its doors to welcome the personator of Revere. This year he was welcomed in t
Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 29., The history of the Royall house and its occupants. (search)
later on the estate was turned back to the heirs for $1.00. In 1790 William Woodbridge kept a boarding and day school in the house, having at one time forty-two boys and ninety-six girls. The estate was sold by the heirs in 1804 to Robert Fletcher for 16,000 pounds. It then passed into the hands of William Welsh of Boston, who in 1810 sold it to Francis Cabot Lowell, and two years later it was sold to Jacob Tidd for $9,000. After the death of Mr. Tidd his widow, who was a sister of William Dawes, lived here for fifty years, up to the time of the Civil War in 1860, since which time it has been occupied by various families until 1905, when the Royall House Association was organized. Much credit is due to the Sarah Bradlee Fulton Chapter, Daughters of the American Revolution, for their conception and active interest to preserve the house. The association purchased the mansion with its slave quarters and three-fourths of an acre of land surrounding it. Old trees planted by the