Browsing named entities in Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I.. You can also browse the collection for Willam L. Dayton or search for Willam L. Dayton in all documents.

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et it not be said that Direct Taxation is to be proportioned to Representation. It is idle to suppose that the General Government can stretch its hand directly into the pockets of the people, scattered over so vast a country. They can only do it through the medium of exports, imports, and excises. For what, then, are all the sacrifices to be made? He would sooner submit himself to a tax, paying for all the negroes in the United States, than saddle posterity with such a Constitution. Mr. Dayton [of New Jersey] seconded the motion. He did it, he said, that his sentiments on the subject might appear, whatever might be the fate of the amendment. Mr. Sherman did not regard the admission of negroes into the ratio of representation as liable to such insuperable objections, etc., etc. Mr. Pinckney [C. C., of South Carolina] considered the Fisheries and the Western Frontier as more burdensome to the United States than the slaves. He thought this could be demonstrated, if the occa
te, the Yeas--for the Proposition as amended — were as follows — the names in italics being those of Whigs: Messrs. Allen, Ashley, Atchison, Atherton, Bagby, Benton, Breese, Buchanan, Colquitt, Dickinson, Dix, Fairfield, Hannegan, Haywood, Henderson, Huger, Johnson, Lewis, McDuffie, Merrick, Niles, Semple. Sevier, Sturgeon, Tappan, Walker, Woodbury--27. The Nays--against the proposed Annexation — were : Messrs. Archer, Barrow, Bates, Bayard, Berrien, Choate, Clayton, Crittenden, Dayton, Evans, Foster, Francis, huntington, Jarnagin, Mangum, Miller, Morehead, Pearce, Phelps, Porter, Rives, Simmons, Upham, White, Woodbridge--25. Yeas: From Free States, 13; Slave States, 14. Nays: From Free States, 12; Slave States, 13. and the proposition being returned to the House, the amendment of the Senate was concurred in by 134 Yeas to 77 Nays — a party vote: so the Annexation of Texas was decreed, in the following terms: Resolved, by the Senate and House of Representatives
nominating Convention met at Philadelphia on the 17th of June, Col. Henry S. Lane, of Indiana, presiding. John C. Fremont, of California, was nominated for President on the first ballot, receiving 359 votes to 196 for John McLean, of Ohio. Willam L. Dayton, of New Jersey, received 259 votes on the informal ballot, to 110 for Abraham Lincoln and 180 scattering, for Vice-President. Mr. Dayton was thereupon unanimously nominated. The more material resolves of this Convention are as follows: Mr. Dayton was thereupon unanimously nominated. The more material resolves of this Convention are as follows: Resolved, That with our republican fathers, we hold it to be a self-evident truth, that all men are endowed with the inalienable rights to life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness; and that the primary object and ulterior design of our Federal Government were, to secure these rights to all persons within its exclusive jurisdiction; that, as our republican fathers, when they had abolished Slavery in all our National territory, ordained that no person should be deprived of life, liberty, or pro
ngton chosen Jeff. Davis's New Democratic platform the National Democratic Convention at Charleston Splits on a platform the fragments adjourn to Baltimore and Richmond Douglas and Fitzpatrick nominated by the larger fraction Breckinridge and Lane by the smaller Fitzpatrick declines H. V. Johnson substituted Bell and Everett nominated by the constitutional Union party Lincoln and Hamlin by the Republicans the canvass Gov. Seward's closing words. the vote polled for Fremont and Dayton in 1856 considerably exceeded the solid strength, at that time, of the Republican party. It was swelled in part by the personal popularity of Col. Fremont, whose previous career of adventure and of daring — his explorations, discoveries, privations, and perils — appealed, in view of his comparative youth for a Presidential candidate, with resistless fascination, to the noble young men of our country; while his silence and patience throughout the canvass, under a perfect tempest of preposter
n, 577; writes to President Lincoln respecting the captured privateersmen, 599. Davis, John, of Mass., 189. Davis, join G., of Ind., named for Speaker, 305. Davis, John W., of Ind., chosen Speaker, 186. Dawson, Wm. C., of Ga., 229. Dayton, Jonathan, Ll. D., 44. Dayton, William L., nominated for Vice-President, 246; in the Chicago Convention, 321. De Bow's Review, citation from, 73. Declaration of Independence, the, extract from the original; reasons for a certain omissionDayton, William L., nominated for Vice-President, 246; in the Chicago Convention, 321. De Bow's Review, citation from, 73. Declaration of Independence, the, extract from the original; reasons for a certain omission, 34; its adoption, 35; its precepts defied by Judge Taney, 254. Delaware, slave population in 1790, 30; 37; Legislature favors the Missouri Restriction, 78; withdrawal of from the Douglas Convention, 318; refuses to secede; answer to the Miss. Commissioner, 350; population in 1.860, 351; 407; Gov. Burton's action with regard to the President's call for troops, 460; 555. De Saussure, W. F., of S. C., resolution of, 346. De Soto, discovers the Mississippi; his death, 53. Detroit, Mic