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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 28 4 Browse Search
Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 26 2 Browse Search
D. H. Hill, Jr., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 4, North Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 22 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 10 2 Browse Search
General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox 8 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 34. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 8 2 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 3. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 7 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 4. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 7 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 5 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 16. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 5 1 Browse Search
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General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox, Chapter 6: the battle of Williamsburg. (search)
e guard of the batteries, and the Sixth, Seventh, and Eighth were deployed on the left in the woodland. Anderson called up Wilcox's brigade, and ordered it to his right, reinforced it by the men of Pryor's brigade not needed at the forts, and presently called for the brigades of A. P. Hill and Pickett, to further support his right. From the swelling noise of battle I concluded that it would be well to ride to the front, and ordered the remaining brigade (Colston's) and the batteries of Dearing and Stribling to follow. Stuart sent his horse artillery under Pelham into the action on the open field. Viewing the ground on the left, I thought it not so well protected as Anderson conceived, and sent to D; H. Hill, who was but little advanced on his march, for one of his brigades. Early's was sent, to whose brigade were temporarily attached the Florida regiment and a Mississippi battalion. Anderson had left the fort, and was busy handling the brigades engaged in the woods on the
General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox, Chapter 23: battle of Fredericksburg (continued). (search)
George E. Pickett :--Garnett's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Richard B. Garnett; 8th, 18th, 19th, 28th, and 56th Va. Armistead's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Lewis A. Armistead; 9th, 14th, 38th, 53d, and 57th Va. Kemper's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. James L. Kemper; 1st, 3d, 7th, 11th, and 24th Va. Jenkins's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. M. Jenkins; 1st (Hagood's), 2d (Rifles), 5th, and 6th S. C.; Hampton Legion; Palmetto Sharp-shooters. Corse's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Montgomery D. Corse; 15th, 17th, 30th, and 32d Va. Artillery, Dearing's (Va.) battery, Fauquier (Va.) Art. (Stribling's battery), Richmond (Fayette) Art. (Macon's battery). Hood's division, Maj.-Gen. John B. Hood :--Law's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. E. M. Law; 4th and 44th Ala.; 6th and 54th N. C. (Col. J. C. S. McDowell); 57th N. C., Col. A. C. Goodwin. Robertson's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. J. B. Robertson; 3d Ark.; 1st, 4th, and 5th Tex. Anderson's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. George T. Anderson ; 1st (Regulars), 7th, 8th, 9th, and 11th Ga. Toombs's Brigade, Col. H. L. Benni
General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox, Chapter 24: preparing for the spring of 1863. (search)
d by that route moving against Richmond. To guard against the former I laid out lines for fieldworks and rifle-pits covering all approaches by the upper fords as far as the road leading from United States Ford. From that point the line broke to the rear, crossing the Plank road and extending back half a mile to command the road from Chancellorsville to Spottsylvania Court-House. When the lines for these works were well marked, I was ordered, with the divisions of Hood and Pickett and Dearing's and Henry's artillery battalions, to the south side near Petersburg, to be in position to meet the latter move, leaving the divisions of McLaws and R. H. Anderson to finish the work on the lines of defence. After passing to the south side of James River, assigning the troops to points of observation near Blackwater River, and establishing Headquarters at Petersburg, I learned that there was a goodly supply of produce along the east coast of Virginia and North Carolina, inside the mili
General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox, Chapter28: Gettysburg-Third day. (search)
ut.-Col. F. G. Skinner; 3d Va., Col. Joseph Mayo, Jr., Lieut.-Col. A. D. Callcote; 7th Va., Col. W. T. Patton, Lieut.-Col. C. C. Flowerree; 11th Va., Maj. Kirkwood Otey; 24th Va., Col. William R. Terry. Armistead's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. L. A. Armistead, Col. W. R. Aylett; 9th Va., Maj. John C. Owens; 14th Va., Col. James G. Hodges, Lieut.-Col. William White; 38th Va., Col. E. C. Edmonds, Lieut.-Col. P. B. Whittle; 53d Va., Col. W. R. Aylett; 57th Va., Col. John Bowie Magruder. Artillery, Maj. James Dearing; Fauquier (Va.) Art., Capt. R. M. Stribling; Hampden (Va.) Art., Capt. W. H. Caskie; Richmond Fayette Art., Capt. M. C. Macon; Virginia Batt., Capt. Joseph G. Blount. Hood's division, Maj.-Gen. John B. Hood, Brig.-Gen. E. M. Law:-- Law's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. E. M. Law, Col. James L. Sheffield; 4th Ala., Lieut.-Col. L. H. Scruggs; 15th Ala., Col. William C. Oates, Capt. B. A. Hill; 44th Ala., Col. William F. Perry; 47th Ala., Col. James W. Jackson, Lieut.-Col. M. J. Bulger, Maj. J. M
General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox, Chapter 43: Appomattox. (search)
deliver to the Union army some fifteen hundred prisoners, taken since we left Petersburg, not all of them by my infantry, Rosser's and Mumford's cavalry having taken more than half of them. Besides these I delivered to General Grant all of the Confederate soldiers left under my care by General Lee, except about two hundred lost in the affairs about Petersburg, Amelia Court-House, Jetersville, Rice's Station, and Cumberland Church. None were reported killed except the gallant officers Brigadier-General Dearing, of Rosser's cavalry, Colonel Bostan, of Mumford's cavalry, and Major Thompson, of Stuart's horse artillery, in the desperate and gallant fight to which they were ordered against the bridge-burning party. General Grant's artillery prepared to fire a salute in honor of the surrender, but he ordered it stopped. As the world continues to look at and study the grand combinations and strategy of General Grant, the higher will be his award as a great soldier. Confederates sh
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 4. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Causes of the Confederate defeat at Gettysburg. (search)
our forces is not molested by the enemy. They evidently believed in building a golden bridge for a flying enemy. Before daylight on the morning of the 3d I received orders to post the artillery for an assault upon the enemy's position, and later I learned that it was to be led by Pickett's division and directed on Cemetery Hill. Some of the batteries had gone back for ammunition and forage, but they were all brought up immediately, and by daylight all then on the field were posted. Dearing's batallion (with Pickett's division) reported sometime during the morning. The enemy fired on our movements and positions occasionally, doing no great damage, and we scarcely returned a shot. The morning was consumed in waiting for Pickett's division, and possibly other movements of infantry. While forming for the attack, I borrowed from General Pendleton, General Lee's chief of artillery, seven 12 pounder howitzers, belonging to the Third corps, under Major Richardson, which I put in r
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 4. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Colonel E. P. Alexander's report of the battle of Gettysburg. (search)
st as they arrived the enemy commenced to give way and the infantry charged upon them. These eight guns were immediately ordered to join in the charge, and Major James Dearing, who had come upon the field in advance of his own battalion (marching with Pickett's division and not yet arrived), was ordered to take charge of them. There formed anew upon the position from which the enemy had been driven, and whence we cannonaded him until dark. During the night ammunition was replenished, and Dearing's battalion, of eighteen guns, and the Washington Artillery, of fourteen guns, arrived and reported to me by order of General Longstreet, by whom I was directed tchief of artillery of this corps. I beg leave particularly to commend the following officers: Colonel Cabell, Major Huger, Major John Haskell, Major Eshleman, Major Dearing, and Major Henry, commanding battalion, on separate commands. Very respectfully, colonel, your obedient servant, E. P. Alexander, Col. Artillery. To G
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., The opposing forces at Williamsburg, Va. (search)
eut.-Col. Joseph Walker; La. Foot Rifles, Capt. McG. Goodwyn; Fauquier (Va.) Artillery, Capt. Robert M. Stribling; Williamsburg (Va.) Artillery, (2 guns), Capt. William R. Garrett; Richmond (Va.), Howitzers (2 guns), Capt. Edward S. McCarthy. Brigade loss: k, 10; w, 75; m, 6 ==91. Third Brigade, Brig.-Gen. George E. Pickett: 8th Va., Lieut.-Col. Norbourne Berkeley; 18th Va., Lieut.-Col. Henry A. Carrington; 19th Va., Col. John B. Strange; 28th Va., Col. Robert C. Allen; Va. Battery, Capt. James Dearing. Brigade loss: k, 26; w, 138; m, 26 == 190. Fourth Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Cadmus M. Wilcox: 9th Ala., Col. Samuel Henry; 10th Ala., Col. John J. Woodward; 19th Miss., Col. Christopher H. Mott (k), Lieut.-Col. L. Q. C. Lamar. Brigade loss: k and w, 231. Fifth Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Roger A. Pryor: 8th Ala., Lieut.-Col. Thomas E. Irby (k); 14th Ala., Maj. 0. K. McLemore; 14th La., Col. R. W. Jones; 32d Va. (detachment); Richmond (Va.) Fayette Artillery, Lieut. W. I. Clopton. Brigade loss:
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., Opposing forces at Seven Pines, May 31-June 1, 1862. (search)
; 17th Va., Col. M. D. Corse. Anderson's (R. H.) Brigade, Col. Micah Jenkins: 5th S. C., Col. J. R. R. Giles (k), Lieut.-Col. A. Jackson; 6th S. C., Col. John Bratton (w and c), Lieut.-Col. J. M. Steedman; Palmetto (S. C.) Sharp-shooters, Maj. William Anderson; Va. Battery, Capt. Robert M. Stribling. Pickett's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. George E. Pickett: 8th Va., Lieut.-Col. N. Berkeley; 18th Va., Col. R. E. Withers; 19th Va., Col. John B. Strange; 28th Va., Col. William Watts; Va. Battery, Capt. James Dearing. Brigade loss: k and w, 350. Wilcox's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Cadmus M. Wilcox: 9th Ala., Lieut.-Col. Stephen F. Hale; 10th Ala., Maj. J. J. Woodward; 11th Ala., Col. Sydenham Moore (m w); 19th Miss., Maj. John Mullins. Brigade loss: k and w, 110. Colston's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. R. E. Colston: 13th N. C.; 14th N. C.; 3d Va. Pryor's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Roger A. Pryor: 8th Ala.; 14th Ala.; 14th La. Hill's division, Maj.-Gen. Daniel H. Hill. Garland's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Samuel Garland
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., chapter 7.51 (search)
ery was on the right of the road, Kerns's and Cooper's on the left, and Diederichs's and Knieriem's yet farther to the left. Thompson's battery of Kearny's division was with General Robinson's brigade (7). Confederate brigades: a, Kemper; b, Pickett (Hunton); c, R. II. Anderson (Jenkins); d, Wilcox; e, Featherston; f, Pryor; g, Branch; h, Archer; i, Field; j, J. R. Anderson; k, Pender; l, Gregg; m, n, o, p, Armistead, Wright, Mahone, and Ransom. Of the Confederate batteries, Rogers's, Dearing's, the Thomas artillery, Pegram's, Davidson's, and others were engaged. The action at White Oak Bridge, about 11 A. M., and that between Huger and Slocum to the left, beginning about 3 P. M., were of artillery only, and were successful from tile Union point of view, in that they prevented the Confederate forces at these points from reenforcing Longstreet, while they enabled four Union brigades (12, 14, 15, and 16) to reenforce his opponents. The battle of Frayser's farm, beginning about
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