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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 28 4 Browse Search
Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 26 2 Browse Search
D. H. Hill, Jr., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 4, North Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 22 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 10 2 Browse Search
General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox 8 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 34. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 8 2 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 3. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 7 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 4. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 7 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 5 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 16. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 5 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for James Dearing or search for James Dearing in all documents.

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among the officers alone. The slaughter among the privates was terrific. The Lynchburgh artillery, formerly known as Latham's battery, now commanded by Captain James Dearing, did good service in the fight. The men fought bravely and laid many a Yankee upon the ground. Capt. Dearing entered with thirty-four cannoneers, and hadCapt. Dearing entered with thirty-four cannoneers, and had nineteen wounded. He also had between thirty and forty horses disabled. The First Lieutenant, James L. Dickenson, had his leg broken. Capt. Dearing is a brave and efficient young officer, and won his spurs on this occasion. One of the batteries captured was the Empire battery, of New-York, Capt. Miller. The guns were new braCapt. Dearing is a brave and efficient young officer, and won his spurs on this occasion. One of the batteries captured was the Empire battery, of New-York, Capt. Miller. The guns were new brass field-pieces, known as the Napoleon gun, made by the American Manufacturing Company. The horses were all killed, but the pieces have been turned over to Captain Miller, of the Washington artillery. Col. D. G. Goodwin, of the Ninth Virginia, was severely wounded. The Petersburgh corps was badly used up. The Twelfth Virginia