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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 12 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 37. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 4 0 Browse Search
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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), School girls cheer. (search)
ng their handkerchiefs; citizens on the roadside are bidding them Godspeed. They reach the heights, but not a moment too soon. Right gallantly do the foam-flecked horses pull up the incline. The Captain rides in front to locate the position of the guns, and ere the whirlwind of dust over the roadway over which they have traveled had well nigh settled to its mother earth, the welcome sound of the first gun is heard as it throws its shell into the head of the enemy's column. Another shell falls in their midst. They waver, confusion reigns in their ranks, and the enemy turned and fled. The successful charge of Graham's battery was followed up in gallant style by the small body of cavalry under General Dearing, who attacked the retreating enemy, taking a number of prisoners and capturing one piece of artillery and two caissons abandoned by the enemy, which he brought to Captain Graham. The gun proved to be a superior howitzer and was attached to his battery to the end of the war.
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Loyal colored man. (search)
a shopkeeper in Vanity Fair would arrange his goods in his shop window—to catch the eye and deplete the pocket of the unwary passerby. Many a pone I did purchase, finding it an agreeable change from baker's bread. Many of the prisoners realized goodly sums of money from the Federal officers in making chessman, rings, breastpins and other articles, out of wood, pieces of bone, and mother-of-pearl. In about ten days we received an addition to our company of some more Petersburg men—among them, Mr. William B. Egerton, taken prisoner in the attack made upon our line a week after, following the affair of the 9th of June. From these prisoners we learned the full particulars of the results of the fight on the 9th of June, and how the city had been saved by Captain Graham's battery and General Dearing's cavalry reaching the heights in time to check General Kautz's advance, and how the city had been stirred up by the deaths of the patriot citizens who had fallen that day in its defe
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.70 (search)
Joseph Mayo, commanding the 3rd Infantry, and next behind me. Soon after Bentley engaged the enemy, Generals Rosser and Dearing rode up at the head of Rosser's Cavalry Division, of which Dearing commanded one of the brigades. Would stay in fightDearing commanded one of the brigades. Would stay in fight. I halted them, and told General Rosser of Pickett's orders, that no troops should pass the head of his division. Well, said General Rosser, my division may halt, but Jim Dearing and myself are going down to help Terry. I knew Rosser and DeariJim Dearing and myself are going down to help Terry. I knew Rosser and Dearing well, for they were both from my county of Campbell, and I knew that objection on my part would be useless. They both had rather be in a fight than out of it. Braver men I never knew. They galloped to the front. Just then a courier from PicketDearing well, for they were both from my county of Campbell, and I knew that objection on my part would be useless. They both had rather be in a fight than out of it. Braver men I never knew. They galloped to the front. Just then a courier from Pickett summoned me down. I transmitted my orders to Mayo, and moved rapidly to the ford. As the enemy saw our approach he evacuated the ford, and hid himself on the eminence just beyond. Bentley had crossed when I got there, and I rode across and so
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 37. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Eighth Virginia's part in second Manassas. (search)
had just started to move forward when the right encountered a pond. It might be ten feet deep for aught we knew. I had just given the order to double quick by the left flank to pass the obstacle, when a little fellow dashed up, exclaiming: Your men are running, sir! Your men are running! Yes, I replied, and by my order. What have you got to do with it? We had quite a spat about it, but an order for our return coming just then, every one was soon in good humor. I do believe that Jim Dearing and a few more I could name really enjoyed a fight when the weather was bright, but fighting in the dark—well, that is another story. Moving into place. The next morning as we were forming line I found our right lapped by about one company of Jenkins', but he, fortunately coming just then, moved his men to the right, as our touch was to the left. I think the men moved off with a more elastic step, knowing we had Jenkins on one flank and the Fourth Texas on the other. We passe
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 37. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Index. (search)
Cook, Capt. John D. S., 195. Corse, Gen., Old Grand Dad, 320. Cowan, Col. Andrew, 194. Crater, Battle of, 208; Who gave order to charge at, 204. Crocker, Hon. J. F., 185, 194; Personal experiences of, 257. Curtin, Hon. A. G., 248. Cushing, Caleb, 42. Cuyler, Lt. Col. R. M., 16. Dahlgren, War-time story of, 198; Defeat of Raid of, 351. Daniel, Hon. John W., 172. Davis, Jefferson. Statement as to causes of his long imprisonment, 243; Reward for arrest of 249. Dearing, Jim, Boy Brigadier, 70, 313. De Lagnel, Major J. A., 16. Douglas, Col H. Kyd, 318. Drewry's Bluff, Errors as to Battle of, corrected, 179. Early, Gen. J. A., 118. Ellyson, J. Taylor, 164. Elzey, Gen. A., 357. Etheredge, Major W. H., 207. Evans, Thomas R. 303. Ewell, Gen. R. S., 33,113; defended 336. Farinholt, Col. B. L., 321. Five Forks, Story of Battle of, 172. Flying machine of the Confederacy, 302. Fredericksburg, Suffering in, after the battle, 3