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Dec. 18. The bill for arming the State of North Carolina passed the Senate, after considerable debate, by a vote of forty-one to three. The Commissioners from Alabama and Mississippi have arrived at Raleigh.--Herald, Dec. 19. Senator Crittenden, of Kentucky, offered a resolution in the Senate for certain amendments to the Constitution, which would practically reestablish the Missouri Compromise, prevent the interference of Congress with slavery in the States, and provide for the the Senate, after considerable debate, by a vote of forty-one to three. The Commissioners from Alabama and Mississippi have arrived at Raleigh.--Herald, Dec. 19. Senator Crittenden, of Kentucky, offered a resolution in the Senate for certain amendments to the Constitution, which would practically reestablish the Missouri Compromise, prevent the interference of Congress with slavery in the States, and provide for the faithful performance of the Fugitive Slave Law.--N. Y. Times, Dec. 19.
of the Georgia Legislature, favoring cooperation, was held at Milledgeville. A convention of Southern States desiring cooperation was urged, and an address to the people of South Carolina, Alabama, Mississippi, and Florida, was issued.--Tribune, Dec. 20. A bill has been introduced into the Legislature of North Carolina, providing that No ordinance of said Convention, dissolving the connection of the State of North Carolina with the Federal Government, or connecting it with any other, have any force or validity until it shall have been submitted to, and ratified by, a majority of the qualified voters of the State for members of the General Assembly, to whom it shall be submitted for their approval or rejection. --Evening Post, Dec. 20. The Commissioner from Mississippi to Maryland addressed the citizens of Baltimore this evening. In the course of his remarks upon the intentions of the seceding States, he said: Secession is not intended to break up the present Go
ving East, and give the South some trouble, in the times now pressing upon us. The position of South Carolina is, however, so firmly taken, that though one rose from the dead to urge her retreat, she would not take one step backward.--N. Y. Times, Dec. 21. The Secession Ordinance passed the Convention of South Carolina to-day by a unanimous vote.--(Doc. 2.) As soon as its passage was known without the doors of the Convention, it rapidly spread on the street, a crowd collected, and thererily, and the people in the streets by hundreds expressed their joy at the secession. Many impromptu speeches were made, and the greatest excitement existed. In the midst of a crowd of over three thousand people, collected in Secession Hall at Charleston this evening, the ordinance of secession was duly signed and sealed by the members of the Convention. The occasion was one of the greatest solemnity at some of its periods, and of the wildest excitement at others.---N. Y. Times, Dec. 21.
airs played. A bust of Calhoun was exhibited decorated with a cockade. South Carolina's secession produced no sensation at Baltimore. People seemed relieved and cheerful, and the streets were gaily crowded, and business was better.--Times, Dec. 22. At Wilmington, Del., one hundred guns were fired to-day in honor of the secession of South Carolina.--Tribune, Dec. 22. The Convention of South Carolina adopted the declaration of causes justifying the secession of that State.--(Doc played. A bust of Calhoun was exhibited decorated with a cockade. South Carolina's secession produced no sensation at Baltimore. People seemed relieved and cheerful, and the streets were gaily crowded, and business was better.--Times, Dec. 22. At Wilmington, Del., one hundred guns were fired to-day in honor of the secession of South Carolina.--Tribune, Dec. 22. The Convention of South Carolina adopted the declaration of causes justifying the secession of that State.--(Doc. 3.)
Dec. 22. Senator Andrew Johnson was burned in effigy at Memphis, Tenn., to-day. There was a secession meeting in Ashland Hall, in Norfolk, Va. Disunion speeches were delivered by Colonel V. D. Grover and General John Tyler. The speeches were enthusiastically applauded.--N. Y. Times, Dec. 23. Senator Crittenden, of Kentucky, made a speech this evening to the citizens of Washington, in which he advocated Union and the laws. This evening the New England Society at New York celebrated the anniversary of the landing of the Pilgrims, by a dinner, toasts, and speeches. The reading of the sentiment, The American Union; it must and shall be preserved, was received with unbounded applause. Among the speakers were the Vice President elect and Senator Seward.--(Doc. 4.) The Charleston Mercury insists that the President will not reinforce the garrison at Fort Moultrie. The reinforcement of the forts at this time and under present circumstances, says that paper, means
or Toombs, of Georgia, assuming that there is no hope of compromise, telegraphed from Washington an address to the people of that State--(Doc. 5.) At Petersburg, Va., a secession pole, one hundred feet high, erected yesterday on the most prominent street, amid the cheers from a large crowd, and bearing the palmetto flag, was sawed down this morning, just before the dawn of day, by an unknown party, and the flag carried off. There was great excitement when it was known.--N. Y. Daily News, Dec. 24. A company of eighty men arrived at Charleston from Savannah, and yesterday tendered their services to the Governor of the State, under the name of the Minute Men, or Sons of the South.--Charleston Courier. The disbursing clerk in charge of the Indian Trust Fund, at Washington, was detected in embezzling a large amount of State bonds and coupons belonging to that fund. The sum is estimated at $830,000. The Secretary of State first discovered the defalcation, and telegraphed to
laise was sung as the banner of the Southern Confederacy was raised, amid reiterated and prolonged cheers for South Carolina and Louisiana.--National Intelligencer, Dec. 25. The election for delegates to the State Convention to meet January 7th, took place to-day. The separate State secession ticket was elected in Mobile by a The election passed off quietly through the State. In many places there was no opposition; the secession ticket, in the whole State, has 50,000 majority.--Times, Dec. 25. Governor Moore issued a proclamation, convening the Legislature of Alabama January 14th, to provide by State laws for any emergency that may arise from th arsenal was to be transferred to new forts in the southwest. A call is in circulation, addressed to the Mayor, to convene a meeting of the citizens to take action in the matter. The call is signed by prominent men of all parties. The feeling against allowing a gun to be removed south is almost unanimous.--Evening Post, Dec. 26.
Nina. The officer who made the statement expressed himself to be ignorant whether the watch on board the Nina discovered the movement or not; at all events, he said, they did not signify any cognizance of the fact.--(Doc. 8.)--Charleston Mercury, Dec. 28; Mess. Barnwell, Orr, and Adams, the Commissioners appointed by South Carolina to treat with the Federal Government, arrived in Washington to-day. This evening they have held a consultation with a few friends, among whom was Senator Wigfall, of Texas.--Boston Post. Dec. 27. In the Convention at Charleston, Mr. Rhett offered the following ordinance: First.--That the Conventions of the seceding slaveholding States of the United States unite with South Carolina., land hold a Convention at Montgomery, Ala., for the purpose of forming a Southern Confederacy. Second.--That the said seceding States appoint, by their respective Conventions or Legislatures, as many delegates as they have representatives in the present Congr
nt at his hands. It behooves the President to purge his cabinet of every man known to give aid and comfort to, or in any way countenancing the revolt of any State against the authority of the constitution and the laws of the Union.--Evening Post, Dec. 28. Captain N. L. Coste, U. S. R. Service, in command of the cutter William Aiken, betrayed his vessel into the hands of the State authorities of South Carolina. The crew, on being notified of the position of Captain Coste, under the Scommand as an officer of South Carolina under that ordinance. See statement of Lieutenant Underwood, N. Y. Times, Jan. 9, 1861. A meeting was held this evening at Richmond, Va., to give expression of opinion on the present crisis. Several speeches were made, favoring prompt secession measures, and others advocating a resort to negotiation.--Herald, Dec. 29. The Governor of South Carolina is tendered the services of troops from Georgia, Alabama, and different portions of Carolina.
ion, for the protection of the government property. Castle Pinckney and Fort Moultrie were held by a very small force, which surrendered without collision.--Times, Dec. 29. An enthusiastic Union meeting was held at Memphis, Tenn., to-day. It was addressed by Hon. Neill S. Brown and others. Resolutions were passed opposing s secession; against coercion; and favoring a Convention of the Southern States to demand their rights, and if refused to take immediate action.--Philadelphia Press, Dec. 29. The citizens of Wilmington, Del., fired a salute of twenty-one guns in honor of Major Anderson and his heroic band. Governor Hicks' refusal to convenrm approbation, and creates great dismay among the disunionists who have urged it. The greater portion of the latter are said to be office-seekers, disappointed politicians, and rowdies, who seek plunder. A prominent gentleman, who has just seen Governor Hicks, says the rank and file of Maryland are true to him.--Tribune, Dec. 29.
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