hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Wendell Phillips, Theodore C. Pease, Speeches, Lectures and Letters of Wendell Phillips: Volume 1 10 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, The new world and the new book 6 0 Browse Search
Elias Nason, The Life and Times of Charles Sumner: His Boyhood, Education and Public Career. 6 0 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 6 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 6 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 6 0 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1 6 0 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3 6 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 4 0 Browse Search
Wendell Phillips, Theodore C. Pease, Speeches, Lectures and Letters of Wendell Phillips: Volume 2 4 0 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Your search returned 160 results in 74 document sections:

1 2 3 4 5 6 ...
On the 21st July we received orders again to remove our encampment, and the spot chosen for it was in the immediate neighbourhood of the Court-house of the county of Hanover, which we reached the evening of that day. The Court-house building was erected in the year 1730, and any structure dating from this period is regarded in America as a very ancient and venerable edifice. Within its walls, in the palmy day of his imperial declamation, the great orator Patrick Henry, the forest-born Demosthenes, had pleaded the celebrated Parsons' cause in a speech the traditions of which yet live freshly in Virginia. It is a small building of red brick, pleasantly situated on a hill commanding a pretty view, several miles in extent, of fertile fields and dark-green woods, and a clear stream, which winds like a silvery thread through the distant valley. The Court-house and several offices belonging to it are surrounded by a shady enclosed grove of locust and plantain trees, about five acres in
Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee, Chapter 14: siege of Petersburg. (search)
ld not gather hope from coming days; clothing, food, ammunition, and forage for animals were so scarce, suffering and distress so plentiful. The leader of a brave people must fight until the war clouds of misfortune enveloped him on so many sides he could fight no longer. I say that, if the event had been manifest to the whole world beforehand, not even then ought Athens to have forsaken this course, if she had any regard for her glory or for her past, or for the ages to come, exclaimed Demosthenes. Self-possessed and calm, Lee struggled to solve the huge military problem, and make the sum of smaller numbers equal to that of greater numbers. It was the old heathen picture of man sublimely contending with Fate to the admiration of the gods, accepting the last test of endurance, and with the smile of a sublime resolution risking the last defiance of fortune. His thoughts ever turned upon the soldiers of his army — the ragged, gallant fellows around him, whose pinched cheeks told
Varina Davis, Jefferson Davis: Ex-President of the Confederate States of America, A Memoir by his Wife, Volume 1, Chapter 40: social relations and incidents of Cabinet life, 1853-57. (search)
l policy; consequently, he never inspired the women to whom he was attentive with the pleasant consciousness of possessing his regard or esteem. He was, until his fracas with Mr. Brooks, fond of talking to Southern women, and prepared himself with great care for these conversational pyrotechnics, in which, as well as I remember, there was much Greek fire, and the set pieces were numerous; he never intruded his peculiar views upon us in any degree, but read up on the Indian mutiny, lace, Demosthenes, jewels, Seneca's morals, intaglios, the Platonian theory, and once gave me quite an interesting resume of the history of dancing. Mr. George Sumner, who was rather a short man and thick-set, also spent part of the winter in the city upon his return from the Crimea, which he had visited as the reporter for some newspapers. He talked in the same predetermined artificial way, but had much that was new and interesting to tell. One evening, in the presence of two officers of the army at ou
G. S. Hillard, Life and Campaigns of George B. McClellan, Major-General , U. S. Army, Appendix. Oration at West Point. (search)
amples. As long as the warm blood courses the veins of man, as long as the human heart beats high and quick at the recital of brave deeds and patriotic sacrifices, so long will the lesson still incite generous men to emulate the heroism of the past. Among the Greeks, it was the custom that the fathers of the most valiant of the slain should pronounce the eulogies of the dead. Sometimes it devolved upon their great statesmen and orators to perform this mournful duty. Would that a new Demosthenes or a second Pericles could arise and take my place to-day! for he would find a theme worthy of his most brilliant powers, of his most touching eloquence. I stand here now, not as an orator, but as a whilom commander, and in the place of the fathers, of the most valiant dead,--as their comrade, too, on many a hard-fought field against domestic and foreign foe,--in early youth and mature manhood,--moved by all the love that David felt when he poured forth his lamentations for the mighty f
s and herds — this slice of the Republic of Mexico, two thousand miles long and some hundred broad — all this our President has cut off from its mother empire, and presents to us, and declares it ours till the Senate rejects it! He calls it Texas! and the cutting off he calls reannexation! Humboldt calls it New Mexico, Chihuahua, Coahuila, and Nuevo Santander — now Tamaulipas; and the civilized world may qualify this reannexation by the application of some odious and terrible epithet. Demosthenes advised the people of Athens not to take, but to retake, a certain city; and in that re lay the virtue which saved the act from the character of spoliation and robbery. Will it be equally potent with us? and will the re prefixed to the annexation legitimate the seizure of two thousand miles of a neighbor's dominion, with whom we have treaties of peace, and friendship, and commerce? Will it legitimate this seizure, made by virtue of a treaty with Texas, when no Texan force — witness th
text-books teach students. These doctrinal teachings would be perfect did all nations stand, in all respects, upon a complete level; but as they do not, the teachings applied to statesmanship are as useless as they are vicious. I have the very highest respect for the learned professors of colleges. But when they go out to talk on politics, they always remind me of a recluse old maid lecturing on how to bring up children. One portion of the exercises of that year was the reading of Demosthenes' Oratio de Corona. I do not like to burden my printer to hunt up the Greek letters Pro Stephanou. The rendering of that oration into good English was a delightful study, and I have a right to say that I charmed my Greek professor in that. But we had, unfortunately for him, a little tiff late in the term. He had an abiding hope of being made professor of rhetoric in connection with our Greek exercises. At the examination before the trustees, he called upon me to read the paragraph com
: Livy, continued; Lincoln's Horace, Odes and Epodes; Latin Metres; Latin Prose Composition. Greek: Homer's Odyssey; Greek Prose Composition. Mathematics: Algebra, continued; Euclid, five books. History: Weber, continued to the end of Ancient history; Roman Commonwealth. Natural Theology: Paley's. Rhetoric: English Grammar, and Orthophony, continued; Themes; Declamations. Sophomore class.--First Term.--Latin: Horace's Satires and Epistles; Cicero de Amicitia; Writing Latin. Greek: Demosthenes' Olinthiacs and Philippics; Buttmann's and Kuhner's Grammars, for reference; Writing Greek. Mathematics: Euclid, continued; Smyth's Plane Trigonometry; Surveying; Navigation. History: Weber, continued to the end of the Middle Ages; Hallam's Middle Ages. Revealed Religion: Paley's Evidences. Rhetoric: Elocution; Themes; Declamations. Second Term.--Latin: Cicero de Officiis; Writing Latin. Greek: Aristophanes' Clouds; Greek Metres Writing Greek. Mathematics: Smyth's Calculus; Spher
fragrance of the rose and the miasma of the fen, the sweet of honey and the bitter of wormwood, the touch of fire and the feeling of ice, are probably the very same which we have experienced. Each of our senses has carried its report to the brain by that faithful electricity of the nerves in which you now rejoice. Your minds, too, though enriched by superior cultivation, have attributes in common with ours. You delight to read the poems of Homer and Virgil, and repeat the orations of Demosthenes and Cicero ; you sometimes tire amid the sublimities of Milton, and love to see man and Nature lay their treasures at Shakspeare's feet. And here let us say, that your classic approbation and noble fire do not probably differ much from ours. In the sweep of centuries, the heart changes less than the head. You feel indignant at the abuse of power and the triumph of wrong, at the sight of ingratitude and the thirst for revenge; while your whole soul melts with sympathy at the sight of
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Sketches of operations of General John C. Breckinridge. (search)
hole life. Thus died, in the fifty-fifth year of his age, one who united in his character more of the elements of true manhood than usually fall to the lot of even the most favored. Fashioned of a manly type, handsome almost to the verge of beauty in his young manhood, yet not effeminate, nature seems to have gifted him at once with a comely person, a mind worthy to adorn its setting, a heart to guide both only to noble thoughts and deeds, and a tongue rivaling the persuasive force of Demosthenes, which knew. no utterance but the truth. Intrepid in the pursuit of the right, he knew no compromise with wrong. Honored as few men ever were by the free voice of a people who loved to exalt him, he might have gained the highest round in the ladder of his country's fame, had he been willing to subordinate to ambition the convictions of his mature judgment. Adhering to these, he linked his destinies with a principle which failed, and died under the ban of the Government under which he
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Benton, Thomas Hart, -1858 (search)
flocks and herds, this slice of the Republic of Mexico, 2,000 miles long and some hundred broad, all this our President has cut off from its mother empire, and presents to us, and declares it is ours till the Senate rejects it. He calls it Texas; and the cutting off he calls reannexation. Humboldt calls it New Mexico, Chihuahua, Coahuila, and Nuevo San Tander (now Tamaulipas) ; and the civilized world may qualify this reannexation by the application of some odious and terrible epithet. Demosthenes advised the people of Athens not to take, but to retake a certain city: and in that re lay the virtue which saved that act from the character of spoliation and robbery. Will it be equally potent with us? And will the re prefixed to the annexation legitimate the seizure of 2,000 miles of a neighbor's dominion, with whom we have treaties of peace, and friendship, and commerce? Will it legitimate this seizure, made by virtue of a treaty with Texas, when no Texan force — witness the disast
1 2 3 4 5 6 ...