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Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 32 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 16 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 6 0 Browse Search
Lucius R. Paige, History of Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1630-1877, with a genealogical register 6 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 4 0 Browse Search
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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Dennie, Joseph, 1768- (search)
Dennie, Joseph, 1768- Journalist; born in Boston, Aug. 30, 1768; graduated at Harvard in 1790; became a lawyer; but abandoned his profession for the pursuit of literature. He contributed articles to various newspapers, while yet practising law, over the signature of Farrago. In 1795 he became connected with a Boston weekly newspaper called The tablet. It survived only three months, when Dennie became the editor of the Farmer's weekly Museum, at Walpole, N. H., which acquired an extensive circulation. To it he contributed a series of attractive essays under the title of The lay preacher. These gave their author a high reputation and were extensivelh acquired a high reputation. In that publication he adopted the literary name of Oliver Oldschool. The Portfolio became the recognized leader in periodical literature, and was enriched by the contributions of some of the foremost writers in the country. Mr. Dennie continued his connection with it until his death, Jan. 7, 1812.
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 9: the beginnings of verse, 1610-1808 (search)
early lighter verse are the humorous poems of Thomas Green Fessenden and of Royall Tyler, See also Book II, Chaps. II, II, and VI. and the nature lyrics of Alexander Wilson. Fessenden contributed humorous poems of New England country life to Dennie's Farmer's weekly Museum, and these were afterwards published in his Original poems. To this same magazine and also to Dennie's Port Folio, Royall Tyler contributed pictures and studies in verse of American environment and character which are woDennie's Port Folio, Royall Tyler contributed pictures and studies in verse of American environment and character which are worth all the pretentious imitations of his contemporaries. The lyrics scattered throughout the pages of Alexander Wilson's Ornithology and afterwards printed in his collected poems merit more attention than they have heretofore received. Wilson was scientist and poet enough to celebrate the osprey, the Baltimore bird, the hummingbird, and the bluebird in true nature lyrics which, together with those of Freneau, are not unworthy forerunners of Bryant's. Philip Freneau was born in New York of
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 3: early essayists (search)
The periodical essay in America. Joseph Dennie. William Wirt. James Kirke Paulding. Rious New England journals. Ellis. H. M., Joseph Dennie and his circle, p. 51. Those of the betterghtly rather than moral. While a law-student, Dennie had supplemented his income by reading sermonsazette, the Philadelphia Port Folio. Though Dennie collaborated with his friend Royall Tyler in aacher (1796), p. 103. In reality, however, Dennie was as fond of conviviality as Steele, and as ccordingly wrote the concluding paragraph, and Dennie never saw it till it was in print. J. T. Bucki of The lay Preacher. The wonder is, not that Dennie should be forgotten, but that, writing so evidme to use their pens while waiting for briefs, Dennie is historically important as one of the first ed from a constitutional profundity which even Dennie could not entirely overcome. It gave to the wn, for instance, appeared-with no reference to Dennie — as the Lay Preacher. Many introductions, ma[2 more...]
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Index. (search)
, the, 230 De Jure Naturae et Gentium, 53 Dekker, Thomas, 230 De l'amerique et des Americains, 188 De Lancey, Susan Augusta, 294 Della Crusca, 178, 179 Democracy Unveiled, etc., 175 Demosthenes, 202 Denham, John, 163 Dennie, Joseph, 180, 234-236, 237, 244 Descartes, 81 Description of New England, a, 16 Descriptive poems (McKinnon), 163 Deserted Farm House, the, 181 Deserted village, the, 163 De Tocqueville, 190 Dial, the, 340-342, 343 Dialogue hnson, Captain, Edward, 22-23 Johnson, Dr. Samuel (1709-84), 70, 82, 94, 233, 288 Johnson, Rev. Samuel (1696-1772), 81-86 Jonathan in England, 228 Jonathan Oldstyle, 233 Jones, Joseph S., 224 n., 228 Jonson, Ben, 150-151 Joseph Dennie and his circle, 233 n. Journal (N. Y.), 149 Journal (Patrick Gass), 205 Journal (Woolman), 86, 87 n., 88 n. Journal kept by John Bartram of Journal of the Continental Congress, 144 Journal of the Federal Convention, 146 Jour
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), chapter 1.9 (search)
cause of its intrinsic merits. A more important Philadelphia periodical was The Port folio, during the editorship of Joseph Dennie. The Port folio was founded in 1800 as a weekly newspaper. In 1806 it changed its form and took on most of the characteristics of a magazine, though it was still published weekly; in 1809 it became a monthly. Dennie died in 1812. The Port folio continued until 1827. For Dennie, see also Book II, Chap. III. Dennie, who signed himself Oliver Oldschool, and accepDennie, see also Book II, Chap. III. Dennie, who signed himself Oliver Oldschool, and accepted complacently the nickname of the American Addison, was a conservative in letters, though he welcomed some of the earlier work of the romantic school in England. During his editorship The Port folio was devoted to what at the time was called elegDennie, who signed himself Oliver Oldschool, and accepted complacently the nickname of the American Addison, was a conservative in letters, though he welcomed some of the earlier work of the romantic school in England. During his editorship The Port folio was devoted to what at the time was called elegant literature; and though to a taste less influenced by eighteenth-century standards it seems formal and sentimental, it exerted a strong influence for good during a critical period of American literature. Among the contributors were Charles Brockd
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 21: Newspapers, 1775-1860 (search)
he magazine by supplying moral, descriptive, and sentimental essays, poetry, anecdotes, reflections, and articles on trade, education, and conduct. Imitators of the English writers of periodical essays, the beginning of whose activities almost coincided with that of American newspapers, See Book I, Chap. VII, and Book II, Chap. II. multiplied in numbers, until towards the close of the century it was a poor paper that did not maintain at least one series. The Lay Preacher essays of Joseph Dennie See Book II, Chap. III. gave The farmers' Museum of Walpole, New Hampshire, as wide a reputation as that of any paper in its day. The editor, usually reflecting the sentiment of a group or a faction, began to emerge as a distinct power. He closely followed the drift of events and expressed vigorous opinions. But as yet the principal discussions were contributed not by the editors but by the master minds of the country. The growing importance of the newspaper was shown in the di
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Index (search)
, 390 Delta (New Orleans), 295, 296 Democracy and other addresses, 247 Democratic review, the, 166, 168 Democratic Vistas, 270 Demosthenes, 96 Dennie, Joseph, 162, 162 n., 179 De Quincey, 68 Derby, George Horatio, 156, 158, 159 Descent into the Maelstrom, the, 68 De Selincourt, Basil, 263 n. Desiree's 319-320, 321, 346 Lamartine, 128 Lamb, Charles, 148, 152, 172, 248, 260, 383, 400 Lang, Andrew, 356 n. Langtree, Samuel Daly, 167 Lay Preacher. See Dennie, Joseph, 179 Lander, F. W., 286 Land of the South, the, 288 Land we love, the, 301, 313 Land where we were dreaming, the, 309 Lanier, Sidney, 289, 2dmixon, John, 107 Old Sergeant, the, 281 Old times, old friends, old Loves, 243 Old Uncle Ned, 353 Oliver, Thaddeus, 280, 303 n. Oliver Oldschool. See Dennie, Joseph Oliver Optic. See Adams, W. T. Ollapodiana papers, 152 Olmsted, F. L., 190 Omnium gatherum, the, 162 On a certain condescension in foreigners
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Book III (continued) (search)
hakespeare, For a full account, see Jane Sherzer's valuable article, Mod. Lang. Ass. Pub., XXII, 633-96. from 1795, when the first one, edited anonymously, was published in Philadelphia, down to 1836, have considerable bibliographical interest, but bibliographical interest almost exclusively. They are all derived, with a minimum of editorial work, from contemporary English editions. The possible exception is the Philadelphia edition of 1805-9, anonymous but pretty surely edited by Joseph Dennie, who, adopting Reed's text of 1803, made a few changes after the text of Ayscough (Dublin, 1791), suggested some conjectural emendations of his own, generally needless, and added a large number of original notes, mostly verbal. The Boston edition of 1836, edited anonymously by Oliver William Bourn Peabody (1799-1848), at that time an editor of The North American Review, is the first American Shakespeare which at least professes to base its text independently upon the Folio of 1623. In
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Index (search)
18 Defoe, 502, 539, 542 De Forest, John W., 76 n. De Haven, 167 D'Holbach, 521 Dekanawida, 619 De l'allemagne, 453 Deland, Margaret, 291 De Leon, Daniel, 600 Deliciae Hortenses, 573 Dellenbaugh, F. S., 138, 141, 150, 158, 160, 167 Del Mar, A., 440 De Long, 168 De Maiden mid Nodings on, 24 De Mille, Wm., 266, 276, 279, 280, 282, 289 Democracy, 86 Democracy and education, 423 Democratic Review. 301, 304 Demosthenes, 465 D'Ennery, 271 Dennie, Joseph, 481 Dennis, J. S., 212 Densmore, 271 Denver Tribune (Colorado), 27 De Quincey, 475 Der Alte Feierheerd, 585 Der arme Teufel, 583 Der Bleicher Apreitor, 602 Der Hoch-Deutsch Pennsylvanische Geschicht-Schreiber, 575 Der Kerchegang in alter Zeit, 585 Der Niagara, 581 Der Pedlar, 580 Der Seekadet, 588 Der Tunnel, 582 Der Unbekanter, 608 Der Wilde, 578 Der Wochentliche Philadelphische Staatsbote, 575, 576 Des armen Teufel Gesammelte Schriften, 583 Desch
singular pleasure. News Letter, 4 Jan. 1733. He was one of the Deacons of the Old South Church, and d. 28 Dec. 1732, a. 65. He left several children, of whom Mary was b. in Camb. 2 June 1691; one m. John Draper, the successor of Mr. Green in the publication of the News Letter; and Bartholomew, a printer in Boston, 1727, rein. to Halifax, N. S., 1751, to establish a printing house, where he died about a month afterwards, a. 52; one of the daughters of Bartholomew, Jr., was mother of Joseph Dennie, Editor of the Port Folio. Thomas's Hist. Printing. 8. Timothy, s. of Samuel (3), was a printer in Boston 1700, rem. to Connecticut 1714, was a Deacon, and d. at New London 5 May 1757, a. 78. 9. John, s. of John (5), m. Mary, dau. of Joseph Bradish, 22 Nov. 1684, and had John, b. 23 Aug. 1688; Mary, bap. 26 June 1698; Sarah, b. 12 June 1701; Hannah, b.; and perhaps others. 10. Nathaniel, s. of John (5), was living in 1691, but not named in his brother Edward's will, 1696. 1
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