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. first brigade. Brigadier-General George A. Custer. First Michigan, Lieutenant-Colonel Peter Stagg. Fifth Michigan, Colonel Russell A. Alger. Sixth Michigan, Major James H. Kidd. Seventh Michigan, Major Henry W. Granger. Second brigade. Colonel Thomas C. Devin. Fourth New York, Lieutenant-Colonel William R. Parnell. Sixth New York, Lieutenant-Colonel William H. Crocker. Ninth New York, Colonel William Sackett. Seventeenth Pennsylvania, Lieutenant-Colonel James Q. Anderson. reserve brigade. Briad better draw in your cavalry, so as to secure the protection of the trains. The order requiring an escort for the wagons to-night has been rescinded. A. A. Humphreys, Major-General, Chief-of-Staff. On the morning of the 6th Custer's and Devin's brigades had been severely engaged at the Furnaces before I received the above note. They had been most successful in repulsing the enemy's attacks, however, and I felt that the line taken up could be held; but the despatch from General Humphr
line of battle on that side of the road. Meanwhile the enemy, desperate but still confident, poured in a heavy fire from his line and from a battery which enfiladed the Brook road, and made Yellow Tavern an uncomfortably hot place. Gibbs's and Devin's brigades, however, held fast there, while Custer, supported by Chapman's brigade, attacked the enemy's left and battery in a mounted charge. Custer's charge, with Chapman on his flank and the rest of Wilson's division sustaining him, was brn at full speed rushed at the enemy. At the same moment the dismounted troops along my whole front moved forward, and as Custer went through the battery, capturing two of the guns with their cannoneers and breaking up the enemy's left, Gibbs and Devin drove his centre and right from the field. Gregg meanwhile, with equal success, charged the force in his rear-Gordon's brigade-and the engagement ended by giving us complete control of the road to Richmond. We captured a number of prisoners, an
where General Gordon's brigade of Confederate cavalry was met. Torbert attacked this force with Devin's brigade, while he sent Custer to Hawe's Shop, from which point a road leading to the right wasg to make a reconnoissance, lost no time in reinforcing them on the north side of the creek with Devin's brigade. The fight then became general, both sides, dismounted, stubbornly contesting the groromptly, Merritt's brigade first, followed by Custer's, on the direct road to Cold Harbor, while Devin's brigade was detached, and marched by a left-hand road that would bring him in on the right and rear of the enemy's line, which was posted in front of the crossroads. Devin was unable to carry his part of the programme farther than to reach the front of the Confederate right, and as Merritt c Torbert was obliged to place a part of Custer's brigade on Merrltt's left so as to connect with Devin. The whole division was now in line, confronted by Fitzhugh Lee's cavalry, supported by Clingma
rties soon after setting out, we began to drive them in. Torbert had the lead with Merritt's and Devin's brigades, and as he pressed back the pickets he came upon the enemy posted behind a line of baCuster had struck the enemy's rear, I directed Torbert to press the line in front of Merritt and Devin, aided by one brigade of Gregg's division on their left, Gregg's other brigade in the meantime a side of Black Creek, Custer's brigade meanwhile moving, mounted, on the road to Cumberland, and Devin's in like manner on the one to Baltimore crossroads. This offer of battle was not accepted, howarted off from the White House. To secure the crossing at Jones's bridge, Torbert had pushed Devin's brigade out on the Long Bridge road, on the side of the Chickahominy where, on the morning of the 23d, he was attacked by Chambliss's brigade of W. H. F. Lee's division. Devin was driven in some little distance, but being reinforced by Getty with six companies of colored troops, he quickly t
ge A. Custer. First Michigan, Colonel Peter Stagg. Fifth Michigan, Major Smith H. Hastings. Sixth Michigan, Colonel James H. Kidd. Seventh Michigan, Major Melvin Brewer. Twenty-fifth New York, Major Charles J. Seymour. Second brigade: Colonel Thomas C. Devin. Fourth New York (1), Major August Hourand. Fourth New York (2), Major Edward Schwartz. Sixth New York, Major William E. Beardsley. Ninth New York, Lieutenant-Colonel George S. Nichols. Nineteenth New York (First Dragoons), Colonel Alfrtt's division could be formed for the charge, it went at Breckenridge's infantry and Fitzhugh Lee's cavalry with such momentum as to break the Confederate left, just as Averell was passing around it. Merritt's brigades, led by Custer, Lowell, and Devin, met from the start with pronounced success, and with sabre or pistol in hand literally rode down a battery of five guns and took about 1,200 prisoners. Almost simultaneously with this cavalry charge, Crook struck Breckenridge's right and Gordon'
were soon captured. The chase was then taken up by Devin's brigade as soon as it could be passed to the fronts incident to a night pursuit made it impossible for Devin to do more than pick up stragglers. Our success men. Meanwhile I, having remained at Woodstock, sent Devin's brigade to press the enemy under every favorable o halting long enough to reorganize. Notwithstanding Devin's efforts the Confederates managed to assemble a conroceed to the front at once, and in conjunction with Devin close with the enemy. He reached Devin's command abDevin's command about 3 o'clock in the afternoon, just as this officer was pushing the Confederates so energetically that they we pass around his left flank, toward Timberville, and Devin's brigade across the North Fork, to move along the bMarket, as a last effort to hold the enemy, I pushed Devin's cavalry-comprising about five hundred men — with t he refused the bait, and after momentarily checking Devin he continued on with little loss and in pretty good
Colonel J. Howard Kitching. cavalry. Brigadier-General Alfred T. A. Torbert. escort. First Rhode Island, Major William H. Turner, Jr. first division. Brigadier-General Wesley Merritt. first brigade: Colonel James H. Kidd. First Michigan, Captain Andrew W. Duggan. Fifth Michigan, Major Smith H. Hastings. Sixth Michigan, Major Charles W. Deane. Seventh Michigan, Major Daniel H. Darling. New York Light Artillery, Sixth Battery, Captain Joseph W. Martin. Second brigade: Colonel Thomas C. Devin. Fourth New York,[Detailed for duty at General Sheridan's headquarters.] Major Edward Schwartz. Sixth New York, Captain George E. Farmer. Ninth New York, Colonel George S. Nichols. Nineteenth New York (First Dragoons), Colonel Alfred Gibbs. First United States Artillery, Batteries K and L, Lieutenant Franck E. Taylor. reserve brigade: (1) Colonel Charles R. Lowell, Jr. (2) Lieutenant-Colonel Casper Crowninshield. Second Massachusetts (1), Lieutenant-Colonel Casper Crowninshield.
uiring much self-reliance. The column was composed of Custer's and Devin's divisions of cavalry, and two sections of artillery, comprising itt to move toward that place with Custer, to be closely followed by Devin, who was to detach one brigade to destroy supplies at Swoope's depoew Hampshire. The night of March 2 Custer camped at Brookfield, Devin remaining at Waynesboroa. The former started for Charlottesville the next morning early, followed by Devin with but two brigades. Gibbs having been left behind to blow up the iron railroad bridge across Sous Amherst Court House, which is sixteen miles short of the town, so Devin, under Merritt's supervision, marched along the James River, destros, and boats, having been preceded by Colonel Fitzhugh's brigade of Devin's division in a forced march to Goochland and Beaver Dam Creek, witrally lifted the wagons out of the mud. From Columbia Merritt, with Devin's division, marched to Louisa Court House and destroyed the Virgini
y on the 29th I moved my cavalry out toward Ream's Station on the Weldon road, Devin commanding the First Division, with Colonels Gibbs, Stagg, and Fitzhugh in charShanandoah. Brigadier-General Wesley Merritt. first division. Brigadier-General Thomas C. Devin. first brigade: Colonel Peter Stagg. First Michigan, Lieutenanrossing on the way a series of small streams swollen to their banks. Crook and Devin reached the county-seat of Dinwiddie about 5 o'clock in the evening, having encn had to unload the wagons and lift them out of the boggy places. Crook and Devin camped near Dinwiddie Court House in such manner as to cover the Vaughn, Flatfoew conditions imposed by my modified instructions, and directed Merritt to push Devin out as far as the White Oak road to make a reconnoissance to Five Forks, Crook being instructed to send Davies's brigade to support Devin. Crook was to hold, with Gregg's brigade, the Stony Creek crossing of the Boydton plankroad, retaining Sm
pinion. The night of March 30 Merritt, with Devin's division and Davies's brigade, was camped onlisted men, Crook having 9,000, and Custer and Devin 5,700. During the 30th, the enemy had been Dinwiddie and Five Forks road in company with Devin. The retreat of Davies permitted Pickett to peparating them and cutting off both Davies and Devin from the road to Dinwiddie, so that to get to situation, but having ordered Merritt to bring Devin and Davies to Dinwiddie by the Boydton road, s Gibbs, Pickett, desisting from his pursuit of Devin, as already stated, turned his undivided attenght the attack might be renewed next morning. Devin and Davies joined me about dark, and my troopsy's infantry fell back on the Five Forks road, Devin pressing him along the road, while Custer extthold on the enemy's works simultaneously with Devin's, but on the extreme left Custer had a very st field are dead-Generals Griffin, Custer, and Devin, whose testimony would have been valuable — an[4 more...]
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