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Joshua Lawrence Chamberlain, The Passing of the Armies: The Last Campaign of the Armies., Chapter 4: Five Forks. (search)
tewart's and Terry's Brigades, to form the other sides of their retreating hollow square. Driven in upon themselves, and over much concentrated, they were so penned in there was not a fair chance to fight. Just as Ayres' and Griffin's men struck the brave fellows holding on around the guns at the Forks, from which Pegram, the gifted young commander, had been borne away mortally wounded,and spirits as well as bodies were falling,--two brigades of our cavalry, Fitzhugh's and Pennington's of Devins' and Custer's commands, seizing the favorable moment, made a splendid dash, dismounted, over the works in their front, passing the guns and joining with our men in pressing back the broken ranks scattering through the thick woods. Bartlett, also, with some of Crawford's men following, came down nearly at the same time from the north on the Ford Road. All, therefore, centered on the three guns there; so that for a moment there was a queer colloquy over the silent guns. The cavalry officers
Joshua Lawrence Chamberlain, The Passing of the Armies: The Last Campaign of the Armies., Chapter 6: Appomattox. (search)
s column pressing on had made a demonstration indicating that they were now about to try a final forlorn hope to cut through near the Court House while the head of their column was engaging Ord. General Sheridan, to thwart this attempt, had taken Devins's Cavalry Division back to meet them, at least until our infantry could be brought up. The barrier of cavalry alone could not withstand the desperate Confederate veterans essaying their last hope, and in fact was slowly receding. This explained densed energies, mounted on the grim charger, Rienzi, that turned the battle of the Shenandoah,--both, rider and steed, of an unearthly shade of darkness, terrible to look upon, as if masking some unknown powers. Right before us, our cavalry, Devins' division, gallantly stemming the surges of the old Stonewall brigade, desperate to beat its way through. I ride straight to Sheridan. A dark smile and impetuous gesture are my only orders. Forward into double lines of battle, past Sheridan, h
cers, exhausted from the labors of the day, falling to sleep in the spot where they halted. Colonel Devins's brigade, of General Buford's command, had relieved the rearguard, and were harassed by theely repulsed, in which work the Ninth New-York cavalry took a conspicuous part. On this day Colonel Devins's advance destroyed twenty wagons between Williamsport and Falling Waters. When Pennington' wounded, while gallantly leading his men. This brigade was relieved by the one commanded by Colonel Devins. the right at Gettysburgh. But little has been said of the part taken by the cavalry of the eight gunners at each gun were either killed or wounded in less than twenty minutes. Devins's brigade at Gettysburgh. General Devins's brigade, of General Pleasanton's division, reachedGeneral Devins's brigade, of General Pleasanton's division, reached Gettysburgh Tuesday, June thirtieth, drove the enemy out, and were most cordially received by the people. The following morning the brigade took a position at the west of the town, when skirmishing
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories, Massachusetts Volunteers. (search)
1864. Before Petersburg June 16-19. Siege of Petersburg June 16-28. Moved to Point Lookout, Md., June 30, and duty there guarding prisoners till March, 1865. Ordered to the field and duty near Richmond, March; near Petersburg, April; near City Point, May, and at Camp Lincoln till June 16. Ordered to Texas and duty at Clarksville till October. Mustered out October 31, 1865. Regiment lost during service 7 Enlisted men killed and 116 Enlisted men by disease. Total 123. Devins' Battalion Mounted Rifles. Organized at Worcester and at Baltimore, Md., April 19, 1861. Attached to the Defenses of Baltimore, Md. Mustered out August 3, 1861. Massachusetts Independent Battalion Cavalry Organized by detachment of Companies I, K, L and M, 1st Massachusetts Cavalry, August 4, 1863. Duty at Beaufort and Hilton Head, S. C., till February, 1864. Company I (a Detachment) at Morris Island, S. C., August to December, 1863. Siege operations against Sumpter a
nfederates from Leesburg along the Dranesville road, while Stone crossed the river and occupied the town. Gen. Stone commenced the passage of the river on the 20th of October. A force of five companies of Massachusetts troops, commanded by Col. Devins, effected a crossing at Edwards' Ferry, and, a few hours thereafter, Col. Baker, who took command of all the Federal forces on the Virginia side, having been ordered by Stone to push the Confederates from Leesburg and hold the place, crossed the river at Conrad's Ferry, a little south of Harrison's Island, and on the direct road to Leesburg. Gen. Stone had ordered seven thousand five hundred men to co-operate in the movement. Baker's brigade, including the advanced companies under Devins, was two thousand three hundred strong, and he was rapidly reinforced until nearly the entire number designated by Stone had been thrown across the river. Meanwhile Gen. Evans, who had taken a position at Goose Creek, awaited the approach of the
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 95 (search)
vision, to follow the enemy up the Luray valley and to push them vigorously. Pond says, page 178: Unfortunately Torbert did not succeed in driving Wickham's cavalry from its strong defensive position at Millford, and hence the portion of Sheridan's plan which contemplated cutting off the enemy's retreat by seizing the pike at New Market was not carried out. On the 21st Torbert had moved through Front Royal into the Luray Valley with the divisions of Merritt and Wilson, excepting Devins's brigade of Merritt's division, which had been left to guard the rear of the army at Cedar Creek. He found Wickham, with his own and Payne's brigades, posted on the south side of Gorny Run. At 2 A. M. of the 22d Custer's brigade was sent back across the South Fork with orders, says Torbert, to march around the enemy's flank to his rear, as he seemed too strong to attack in front; but Torbert, on moving forward at daylight, found the enemy had retreated to a still stronger position on the
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Retreat up the Luray Valley. (search)
vision, to follow the enemy up the Luray valley and to push them vigorously. Pond says, page 178: Unfortunately Torbert did not succeed in driving Wickham's cavalry from its strong defensive position at Millford, and hence the portion of Sheridan's plan which contemplated cutting off the enemy's retreat by seizing the pike at New Market was not carried out. On the 21st Torbert had moved through Front Royal into the Luray Valley with the divisions of Merritt and Wilson, excepting Devins's brigade of Merritt's division, which had been left to guard the rear of the army at Cedar Creek. He found Wickham, with his own and Payne's brigades, posted on the south side of Gorny Run. At 2 A. M. of the 22d Custer's brigade was sent back across the South Fork with orders, says Torbert, to march around the enemy's flank to his rear, as he seemed too strong to attack in front; but Torbert, on moving forward at daylight, found the enemy had retreated to a still stronger position on the
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 16. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Two cavalry Chieftains. [New Orleans Picayune, August 12th, 1888.] (search)
ng to the right of General Lee's right flank, marched to Beaver Dam station on the Newport News and Mississippi Valley railroad, and from that point by the Louisa or Old Mountain Road, via Glen Allen, a station on the Fredericksburg railroad, to the Yellow Tavern. His command consisted of three divisions under Generals Merritt, Wilson, and Gregg, numbering, according to the official returns of the Federal army, dated May 1, 1864, 9,300 men in the saddle. His brigade commanders were Custer, Devins, Gibbs, Davies. J. Irvin Gregg, McIntosh, and Chapman. General Stuart followed these seven brigades of Sheridan with the three brigades of his command, viz: Lomax's and Wickham's of Fitz Lee's division, and a North Carolina brigade under General Gordon, making a total effective force of some 3,000 troopers. On the morning of the 11th General Stuart intercepted, at Yellow Tavern, Sheridan's line of march, and succeeded in interposing his small force between Richmond and the Federal caval
e was so hastened that he was compelled to leave sixteen guns and over a thousand prisoners in our hands. Yesterday morning the pursuit of the enemy was promptly continued by our cavalry, and he was found in position at Mount Jackson, twenty-five miles south of Fisher's Hill, where he seems disposed to offer a stubborn resistance to our further advance. Yesterday morning Early's rear was overtaken near Hawkins's bridge by General Averill, with a cavalry division and the brigade of General Devins, and driven to the town of Mount Jackson, where his entire force was found in possession. General Averill was relieved from duty with his division this morning, and granted a leave of absence for twenty days. This order has caused a universal feeling of amazement in this army, and it is generally thought that some question of rank between General Averill and General Torbert is involved, the former being the ranking officer, but the latter chief of cavalry of this military division.
en called to arms by General Fisk, in anticipation of a visit from Price. The Late operations in the Valley. A correspondent of the Herald, writing from the Valley on the 9th, gives an account of the reverse of General Rosser. On that day, Sheridan halted and sent his cavalry back to drive off Rosser, who had been greatly annoying his rear. Torbert had command of the expedition. The letter says: Sharp skirmishing in the front did not seem to indicate anything decisive until Devins's brigade succeeded in striking the enemy on the flank. This produced consternation in the rebel ranks in Merritt's front. The whole division line then pushed forward and followed the enemy, who was now in full retreat. The retreat was soon turned into a perfect rout. Custer and Merrit pursued the flying fugitives, capturing guns, caissons, wagons, a herd of cattle, and several hundred prisoners. Among the wagons captured are several ammunition wagons, and those containing the baggag
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