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Jula Ward Howe, Reminiscences: 1819-1899 52 0 Browse Search
Charles E. Stowe, Harriet Beecher Stowe compiled from her letters and journals by her son Charles Edward Stowe 26 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 24 0 Browse Search
Mary Thacher Higginson, Thomas Wentworth Higginson: the story of his life 24 0 Browse Search
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1 20 0 Browse Search
Bliss Perry, The American spirit in lierature: a chronicle of great interpreters 18 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, The new world and the new book 16 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 16 0 Browse Search
James Parton, The life of Horace Greeley 16 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: December 18, 1865., [Electronic resource] 15 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Mary Thacher Higginson, Thomas Wentworth Higginson: the story of his life. You can also browse the collection for Charles Dickens or search for Charles Dickens in all documents.

Your search returned 12 results in 5 document sections:

Mary Thacher Higginson, Thomas Wentworth Higginson: the story of his life, XIII: Oldport Days (search)
Tales? In 1867, Colonel Higginson translated various sonnets from Petrarch, wrote essays and short stories for the Atlantic, continued his army papers, and compiled a little book by request of Ticknor and Fields, called Child Pictures from Dickens, which was issued at the time of Dickens's second visit to this country. The summary of a single day's occupation, jotted down in the diary, illustrates the truth of Mr. A. Bronson Alcott's description of Colonel Higginson as a man of tasks. Dickens's second visit to this country. The summary of a single day's occupation, jotted down in the diary, illustrates the truth of Mr. A. Bronson Alcott's description of Colonel Higginson as a man of tasks. In one day he had revised a memoir for one of the numerous literary aspirants who continually sought his sympathetic aid, written a book notice and several letters, made the first draughts of two Independent articles, aided in a written examination of the high school for one and a half hours in the afternoon, and spent two and a half hours examining school papers in the evening, besides his usual exercise. In the summer of this year (1867), he embodied some of his translations of Petrarch's
Mary Thacher Higginson, Thomas Wentworth Higginson: the story of his life, XV: journeys (search)
all about it—this was Mrs. M. They are much with all the literary people, Rossettis, etc., and confirmed what I had heard that there is a strong reaction against Dickens—it is not the thing to admire him, his subjects are thought commonplace and his sentiments forced. Walt Whitman among their set is the American poet; the taste fd seamed—he had but little book knowledge but wonderful originality and power. Hamilton had great hold upon young men collectively though not individually. When Dickens first came here, Wilson said of him How could that puppy have written such books. Masson says Dickens' imagination was so active his narratives had very little vDickens' imagination was so active his narratives had very little value . . . . The Massons knew Alexander Smith and Sydney Dobell the two young poets, both of whom have died and both interested me . . . . I praised Dobell's ballad of Ravelston so much that Mrs. M. ordered a carriage and drove me there in the dark leaving at 9 and returning at 11 . . . . The house is quaint and old and is the orig<
Mary Thacher Higginson, Thomas Wentworth Higginson: the story of his life, XVI: the crowning years (search)
third course, in 1905, he wrote:— Feb. 28. First Lowell lecture (Wordsworth-shire). A great success—an unexpectedly fine voice. March 7. Second Lowell lecture. Carlyle, Ruskin, Froude, Hunt. March 28. Fifth Lowell lecture. Dickens, Thackeray and reading Tennyson's poems. April 4. Last Lowell lecture. Considered very successful and was pronounced by John Lowell the best he ever heard in that hall. In May, 1903, he spoke at the Concord Emerson celebration:— r makes me, at least, more democratic, with less reverence for the elect and more faith in the many. During the winter of 1911, strength gradually failed, though interest in the affairs of life never flagged. In February, he read a paper on Dickens, with all his old spirit, before the Round Table, and in April, he attended a meeting of the Authors' Club in Milton. His last thoughts and directions were for others, and his last days painless and serene. On the evening of May 9, while soft <
Mary Thacher Higginson, Thomas Wentworth Higginson: the story of his life, Bibliography (search)
port Wharves. (In Atlantic Monthly, Jan.) Def. v. The Pedigree of Liberalism. (In Radical, March.) The American Lecture System. (In Macmillan's Magazine, May.) Same. (In Littell's Living Age, June 6.) (Adapted.) Child Pictures from Dickens. Book notices and editorials. (In Independent.) The book notices include a series, Live Americans, giving accounts of Longfellow, Lowell, and others. 1869 (Newport) Malbone. Same. (In Atlantic Monthly, Jan.-June.) Ought Women t Note by Higginson. Articles. (In Boston Evening Transcript.) 1910 (With others.) In After Days: Thoughts on the Future Life. Introduction. (In Austin's Peter Rugg, the Missing Man.) William J. Rolfe. (In Emerson College Magazine, Nov.) (Ed.) Descendants of the Reverend Francis Higginson. (Genealogy.) Articles. (In Congregationalist and Christian World, Boston Evening Transcript.) 1911 Dickens in America. (Appeared after Col. Higginson's Death in Outlook,
it to, 334. Decoration Day, a poem, 273, 340. Descendants of the Reverend Francis Higginson, 396, 398, 428. Devens, Charles, appeal to, 111, 112. Dickens, Charles, 339; reaction against, 336. Dickens, Child Pictures from, 277, 410. Dickinson, Emily, Higginson's acquaintance with, 312, 313; letters and poems of, eDickens, Child Pictures from, 277, 410. Dickinson, Emily, Higginson's acquaintance with, 312, 313; letters and poems of, edited, 368, 369. Disunion, plan for, 181, 182. Dobell, Sydney, account of, 339, 340. Driftwood, Fire, A, 275, 410; Higginson's estimate of, 276. Durant, Henry F., founder of Wellesley, 24. Ellis, Charles Mayo, 112, 113. Emerson, George B., asks Higginson to write youthful history of United States, 284, 285; success his own style, 274, 275; Malbone, 275, 278-82, 289; and Atlantic Monthly, 275; Driftwood Fire, 275, 276; translates Petrarch, 276-78; compiles Child Pictures from Dickens, 277; literary work, 277, 279; working on Army Life, 282; increased reputation, 283; literary projects, 283, 284, Galatea Collection, 284; writes Young Folks' His