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Jula Ward Howe, Reminiscences: 1819-1899 52 0 Browse Search
Charles E. Stowe, Harriet Beecher Stowe compiled from her letters and journals by her son Charles Edward Stowe 26 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 24 0 Browse Search
Mary Thacher Higginson, Thomas Wentworth Higginson: the story of his life 24 0 Browse Search
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1 20 0 Browse Search
Bliss Perry, The American spirit in lierature: a chronicle of great interpreters 18 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, The new world and the new book 16 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 16 0 Browse Search
James Parton, The life of Horace Greeley 16 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: December 18, 1865., [Electronic resource] 15 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1. You can also browse the collection for Charles Dickens or search for Charles Dickens in all documents.

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Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 5: travel 1843-1844; aet. 24-25 (search)
s, but Dr. Howe's reputation had preceded him, and every reader of Dickens's American notes was eager to meet the man who had brought a soul l evening at his house. Another of their early visitors was Charles Dickens. Not only did he invite them to dine, but he took them to allld show him things that no one else could. The following note, in Dickens's unmistakable handwriting, shows how these expeditions were manage were, of course, forced to decline. We had a pleasant dinner at Dickens's, on Saturday--a very handsome entertainment, consisting of all manner of good things. Dickens led me in to dinner — waxed quite genial over his wine, and was more natural than I ever saw him-after dinner en too busy to write. We dined on Wednesday with Kenyon — present Dickens's wife, Fellows, Milnes and some others — Milnes a pert little prir to England. have given us a beautiful and most agreeable dinner: Dickens, Mrs. Norton, Moore, Landseer, and one or two others. Rogers says<
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 13: concerning clubs 1867-1871; aet. 48-52 (search)
ell Holmes, John Weiss and James Freeman Clarke, Athanase Coquerel, the noble French Protestant preacher; William Henry Channing, worthy nephew of his great uncle; Colonel Higginson, Doctor Bartol, and many others. Extravagant things were sometimes said, no doubt, and the equilibrium of ordinary persuasion was not infrequently disturbed for a time. But the satisfaction of those present when a sound basis of thought was vindicated and established is indeed pleasant in remembrance.... To Dickens's second reading, which I enjoyed very much. The wreck in David Copperfield was finely given. His appearance is against success; the face is rather commonplace, seen at a distance, and very red if seen through a glass: the voice worn and blas&. ... Club in the evening, at which my nonsense made people laugh, as I wished.... A little intoxicated with the pleasure of having made people laugh. A fool, however, can often do this better than a wise man. I look earnestly for a higher tas
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 11: eighty years 1899-1900; aet. 80-81 (search)
and to hand. I am also confused between the work already done on my reminiscences, and that still wanting to give them some completeness. May the all-father help me! January 9. dined with the Massachusetts Press Club Association. I made a little speech partly thought out beforehand. The best bit in it--why should we fear to pass from the old Testament of our own liberties, to the New Testament of liberty for all the world? --came to me on the spur of the moment.. .. January 16. .. Dickens party at the New England Woman's Club. I despaired of being able to go, but did manage to get up a costume and take part. many very comical travesties, those of Pickwick and Captain Cuttle remarkably good; also Lucia M. Peabody as Martin Chuzzlewit, and Mrs. Godding in full male dress suit. I played a Virginia reel and finally danced myself. the part she herself took on this occasion was that of Mrs. Jellyby, a character she professed to resemble. At another Club party she impersona
e, I, 4. DeKoven, Reginald, II, 195. Deland, Lorin, II, 332, 333. Deland, Margaret, II, 303, 332. Delineator, II, 381. DeLong, G. W., I, 322, 325. Demesmaker, see Cutler, John. Denver, II, 152, 153. Descartes, Rene, II, 397. Desgrange, Mme., II, 240. Detroit, II, 141. Devonshire, Duchess of, II, 8. Devonshire, Wm. Cavendish, Duke of, II, 8. DeWars, Mr., II, 224. Diana, Temple of, II, 6. Diaz, Abby M., II, 323. Dickens, Catherine, I, 85. Dickens, Charles, I, 71, 81, 83, 84, 87, 286. Diman, Mr., II, 304. Dirschau, II, 14. Dix, Dorothea, I, 73. Dole, N. H., II, 273. Donald, Dr., II, 199, 200, 203. Doolittle, Senator, I, 239. Dore, Gustave, II, 248. Dorr, Mary W., I, 74, 128, 214. Downer, Mr., II, 362. Doyle, Lt., II, 104. Draper, Gov., II, 253. Dresel, Otto, I, 245; II, 375. Dublin, I, 88, 90. Dubois, Prof., II, 261, 262. DuMaurier, George, II, 239. Dunbar, P. L., II, 261. Dunbar, Mrs. P.