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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore), Doc. 95.-reconnoissance to Dalton, Ga. (search)
heavens were lighted up with the lurid fires of Cleburne's old camp, (upon the east side of Tunnel Hill Range,) which our troops had set on fire. In the town I learned that General Wheeler himself was in command of the rebel cavalry which had all along been opposing us. Simultaneously with the advance of the column from Chattanooga, General Crufts moved down from the vicinity of Cleveland, joined afterward by Matthias's brigade, of the Fifteenth army corps, commanded at present by Colonel Dickerman, of the One Hundred and Third Illinois. Colonel Long, with some seven hundred cavalry, preceded General Crufts. This column skirmished as successfully with the enemy as the other, and on the twenty-third, Colonel Long penetrated to within four miles of Dalton. Another sunny, warm, pleasant, smoky morning dawned upon us on the twenty-fifth, and all portions of our forces being prepared to act in concert, it was determined to make a bold move, which might test whether or not the e
e to the north. Our lines were soon formed, my brigade on the ridge to the right, covering the summit and extending well over the western slope; the Thirtieth Indiana, Seventy-fifth and Eightieth Illinois in the front line, from right to left, in the order I have named them; the Eighty-fourth Illinois, Twenty-fourth Ohio, and Thirty-sixth Indiana in the second line. The Second brigade, Colonel Champion, formed on my left, Colonel Lorng's cavalry extending his left, the other brigade, Colonel Dickerman, in reserve. It was now about nine A. M. Major-General Palmer appeared on the field. send wished to see me. I reported to him in front on the skirmish-line. After consultation, the General informed me that we would not advance until General Baird's division should arrive in the valley to my right. About eleven o'clock all was ready and I sounded the forward, and the whole line moved off in splendid order. I rode with Colonel Bennett, Seventy-fifth Illinois, whose battalion was the