Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: September 9, 1861., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Dix or search for Dix in all documents.

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Large business. --General Dix has ordered the vice police of Baltimore to stop the sale of Confederate flags, badges and envelopes, and also the likenesses of President Davis, Generals Beauregard, Lee, Johnston, and all persons citizens of the Confederate States. Persons wearing red and white neck-ties have been compelled to take them off, under the threat that if they refused they would be taken to the station-house. One gentleman had exposed in the show-case of his store a pair of infant's socks, knit of red and white yarn. He was compelled to remove them, the vice policemen asserting that the colors were those of the Confederates. The Exchange says: All day Thursday the police were busily doing this dirty work. Some of them felt that they were engaged in a low business, and in some few instances apologized for their conduct, remarking that want of bread alone compelled them to be the tools of their superiors. The little boys on the street, who have been earning a
the assertions of a Yankee whose own wife has denounced him through the newspapers, and declared her purpose of procuring a divorce from such an ingrate. Later from Missouri. A Federal dispatch from Hannibal, Mo., Sept. 5, says: Corporal Dix, of the 3d Ohio Regiment, while out scouting with five men at Kirksville, last week, was surrounded in a farm-house while at dinner, by a party of twenty-five Secessionists, who demanded a surrender. He refused, and the Secessionists made an attack, when a severe fight ensued, but the Federalists maintained their position in the house, driving their assailants from the ground with a loss of seven killed and four wounded. Corporal Dix was killed, but none of the other of the Federalists were hurt. Under the same date we have the following from Quincy, Ill.: Gen. Pope left here last evening to take the field in Missouri. The Confederates have torn up the railroad track and cut down the telegraph poles between Hunnewell an