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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore) 16 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Isaac J. Dodge or search for Isaac J. Dodge in all documents.

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ch indebted for his zeal and efforts in having the ship ready to go under fire. Acting Master Billings, a volunteer from the Vincennes, kept his post faithfully, and though quite severely hurt, still remained. To Acting Master Young, Acting Ensigns Dodge and McEntee, my thanks are due, for their steadiness and promptness at their quarters. The Engineer department, under the charge of Mr. Shipman, Acting Chief-Engineer, was well attended to, and his subordinates' conduct met my approbation. To Assistant-Surgeon Dodge, and Paymaster Pynchon, and in fact all, I tender my hearty thanks. Very respectfully, your obedient servant, C. H. Green, Lieutenant Commander. Rear-Admiral D. G. Farragut, Commanding W. G. B. Squadron. U. S. S. Octorara, Mobile Bay, Aug. 5, 1864. sir: In obedience to your order of this day, I have the honor to submit the following report of damages done this ship by shot in passing the Fort this morning. They are as follows: One shot in starboard-
rn, with a large mounted force, attacked Franklin, but was repulsed by Major-General Granger, with a loss of nineteen killed, thirty-five wounded left on the field, and forty-eight prisoners. Major-General Joseph J. Reynolds made a raid upon the Manchester and McMinnville Railroad, destroying depots, rolling-stock, supplies, and other property, and capturing one hundred and eighty prisoners. Colonel Straight, with about one thousand six hundred men, including reenforcements received from General Dodge at Tuscumbia, started on a raid into Georgia to cut the enemy's communications. After heavy losses in skirmishes with Forrest's cavalry, and when near its destination, he was forced to surrender. On the twenty-second of May, Major-General Stanley made a raid upon Middleton, capturing eighty prisoners, three hundred horses, six hundred stand of arms, and other property. On the fourth of June, the rebel General Forrest made a raid on Franklin, and on the eleventh attacked Triune. H
d General Hurlbut as to West-Tennessee, and assigned General Blair to the command of the Fifteenth army corps; and I summoned General Hurlbut from Memphis, and General Dodge from Corinth, and selected out of the Sixteenth corps a force of about eight thousand men, Which I directed General Dodge to organize with all expedition and wGeneral Dodge to organize with all expedition and with it to follow me eastward. On the twenty-seventh October, when General Blair with two divisions was at Tuscumbia, I ordered General Ewing, with the Fourth division, to cross the Tennessee, by means of the gunboats and scow, as rapidly as possible, at Eastport, and push forward to Florence, which he did, and the same day a mesand proceeded to Winchester and Decherd. At Fayetteville I received orders from General Grant to come to Bridgeport with the Fifteenth army corps, and leave General Dodge's command at Pulaski and along the railroad from Columbia to Decatur. I instructed General Blair to follow with the Second and First divisions by way of New-M
ection, were placed in position within a hundred and fifty yards of the rebel lines, under a severe fire of musketry. We went in with four pieces, fifty horses, eighty-two men, and four officers, namely, Captain Hamilton, Lieutenant Myrick, Lieutenant Dodge, and myself. In twenty minutes we lost forty-five men, forty horses, two guns, and four officers, when we managed to get off with what little there was left. It was our misfortune to have for support a negro regiment, which, by running, cay had fifteen thousand men opposed to us, and, of course, whipped us badly. Captain Hamilton is wounded in his left arm severely, and in the hip. Lieutenant Myrick is badly wounded in the left foot, and will probably lose some of his toes. Lieutenant Dodge is wounded in the left arm, but not badly. I am wounded in the right leg, about three inches above the ankle-joint, but not badly. All of us officers had our horses shot under us. We are now on board of this steamer, bound for Beaufort, wh