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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 18 2 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Donnolly or search for Donnolly in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Beauregard's report of the battle of Drury's Bluff. (search)
n them, a sentinel was placed to warn them off. At that time the man who held this post was private Donnolly, of Company G, First Georgia, a native of the Emerald Isle, as his name would indicate, andhe was calmly innocent. On one occasion a Lieutenant of the company asked him, impatiently: Donnolly, why don't you keep step? All the men are complaining about you. And received the reply: Foud Shtop! uttered in the most emphatic tone, and the emphasis receiving additional point from Donnolly's attitude, as he stood with his musket at full cock, at the shoulder, and squinted along the b to General Ripley the reason for his being halted. Subsequently, our sentinel was asked: Donnolly, what were you going to do? I was going to shot him. And why? To kape him from being blown up with the saltpaters, to be sure. Donnolly's comrades, in view of his little infirmities of drill, had always insisted upon his having a place in the rear rank, but on this day he was heard t
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Reminiscences of service in Charleston Harbor in 1863. (search)
n them, a sentinel was placed to warn them off. At that time the man who held this post was private Donnolly, of Company G, First Georgia, a native of the Emerald Isle, as his name would indicate, andhe was calmly innocent. On one occasion a Lieutenant of the company asked him, impatiently: Donnolly, why don't you keep step? All the men are complaining about you. And received the reply: Foud Shtop! uttered in the most emphatic tone, and the emphasis receiving additional point from Donnolly's attitude, as he stood with his musket at full cock, at the shoulder, and squinted along the b to General Ripley the reason for his being halted. Subsequently, our sentinel was asked: Donnolly, what were you going to do? I was going to shot him. And why? To kape him from being blown up with the saltpaters, to be sure. Donnolly's comrades, in view of his little infirmities of drill, had always insisted upon his having a place in the rear rank, but on this day he was heard t