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Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 2 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore) 2 0 Browse Search
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Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 44: battle of Mobile Bay. (search)
Adam Duncan and Charles Deakin, Boatswain's Mates; Cornelius Cronin, Chief Quartermaster; William Wells, Quartermaster; Henry Sharp, Seaman; Walter B. Smith, Ordinary Seaman; George Parks, Captain of Forecastle; Thomas Hayes, Lebeus Simkins, Oloff Smith and Alex. H. Truett, Coxswains; Robert Brown and John H. James, Captains of Top; Thomas Cripps and John Brazell, Quartermasters; James H. Morgan and John Smith, Captains of Top; James B. Chandler, Coxswain; William Jones, Captain of Top; William Doolan, Coalheaver; James Smith, Captain of Forecastle; Hugh Hamilton, Coxswain; James McIntosh, Captain of Top; William M. Carr, Master-at-Arms; Thomas Atkinson, Yeoman; David Sprowls, Orderly Sergeant; Andrew Miller and James Martin, Sergeants of Marines. From the additional Report of Captain Percival Drayton, commanding Hartford: Sir — I beg leave to call your attention to the conduct of the following petty officers and others of this vessel during the action of the 5th instant, w
t. Philip; the Chalmettes; batteries below Vicksburgh; and present at the surrender of New-Orleans. Joined the Richmond in September, 1863. 20. William Jones (Captain of Top) is recommended for coolness and good conduct as captain of a gun in the action in Mobile Bay on the morning and forenoon of the fifth of August, 1864. Joined the Dacotah in September, 1861, and was on board the Cumberland when sunk by the Merrimac at Newport News. Joined the Richmond in September, 1863. 21. William Doolan (coal-heaver) is recommended for coolness and good conduct, and for refusing to leave his station as shot and shell-passer, after having been knocked down and badly wounded in the head by splinters; and upon going to quarters the second time he was found at his station nobly doing his duty, in the action in Mobile Bay on the morning and forenoon of August fifth, 1864. He was in Fort Piekens when it was bombarded by the rebels; was on board the Brooklyn in the actions with Forts Jackson