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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 13. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 59 59 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 56 56 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 3. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 36 34 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 29 29 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 27 27 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 1. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 25 25 Browse Search
Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant 24 24 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 24 24 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: May 25, 1863., [Electronic resource] 22 0 Browse Search
Adam Badeau, Military history of Ulysses S. Grant from April 1861 to April 1865. Volume 1 22 22 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 5. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Dorn or search for Dorn in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 5. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Grant as a soldier and Civilian. (search)
th the quasi victory over Price at luka, which was followed, two weeks later, by the repulse of Van Dorn (by Rosecranz) at Corinth. Notwithstanding the great advantages these successes gave Grant, s inaction and sluggish conduct the whole of this important campaign was completely defeated by Van Dorn's brilliant dash, at the head of two thousand horsemen, into the depot of the Federal army at Holly Springs. In one day Van Dorn destroyed three months supplies, for sixty thousand men, and compelled Grant to fall back and abandon the invasion of Mississippi. But the Northern government soon anz during Grant's absence, who, on his return, not only failed to follow up the beaten army of Van Dorn, but allowed it to recruit and reorganize close by him, and when at last he did march against iree months before. This unpardonable inaction, and the grave neglect to guard his depots, gave Van Dorn the opportunity to pass behind him, destroy all the supplies of his army, and defeat his campai